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 CHEAPEST way to kill mesquite trees
microsuck1  [Team Member]
11/1/2011 10:39:14 AM EST
I dont need them to dissapear quickly, just want them to die, so next season I can pull them out and use for firewood. I was thinking drill a 1/2 inch hole in the trunk diagonally and fill with diesel. I dont want to waste time chainsawing them. I also have a 4x4 diesel HD dually truck and chain, but not sure how big a tree can be yanked out with that.
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Some_Beach  [Team Member]
11/1/2011 11:01:55 AM EST
Girdle them
Abearir  [Member]
11/1/2011 11:25:46 AM EST
Originally Posted By Some_Beach:
Girdle them


This.... then send dried and cut (18") blocks to me!
TxRabbitBane  [Team Member]
11/1/2011 11:28:23 AM EST
Originally Posted By microsuck1:
I dont need them to dissapear quickly, just want them to die, so next season I can pull them out and use for firewood. I was thinking drill a 1/2 inch hole in the trunk diagonally and fill with diesel. I dont want to waste time chainsawing them. I also have a 4x4 diesel HD dually truck and chain, but not sure how big a tree can be yanked out with that.


1. You can't kill mesquite trees. They are legion.
2. You will break many chains that way. A D-6, however, will do the trick nicely, if you happen to have one laying around.

ETA I've killed mesquite trees (big ones anyway) by cutting them off at the ground, digging out as much of the root ball as I can, and building a fire around the (exposed) root ball. It's hard work though.
William_lxix  [Team Member]
11/1/2011 11:44:05 AM EST
Originally Posted By microsuck1:
... I dont want to waste time chainsawing them. I also have a 4x4 diesel HD dually truck and chain, but not sure how big a tree can be yanked out with that.


A chainsaw is much cheaper & easier to use. If you don't want to buy a smaller one - rent one.

If you don't want to even do that, use an AXE or even a hand saw depending on size of the trees!

~Will
1fromtx  [Team Member]
11/1/2011 3:14:21 PM EST
Remedy and Diesel.

I've been taking them out all summer.

You need to apply it when the temps are above 77-78,I think. The hotter it is the better.

It's not cheap though, bout $80 + a gal. Directions say use 3 oz per gal. I use 4 oz.per gal.
stevem1a  [Team Member]
11/1/2011 3:15:39 PM EST
Salt is both cheap and low labor, but you will NOT be able to grow anything there again.
EvilVaquero  [Team Member]
11/1/2011 4:03:49 PM EST
Grow them as large as you can (BIG) then cut them down, and sell the wood. When properly cured, mesquite wood will make pistol grips that are outa this world. The wood is considered an exotic and worth big bucks. Just sayin.
lukus  [Member]
11/1/2011 8:04:57 PM EST
Be REAL careful with the Remedy. It will kill ANY tree you get it on. If you get the smallest bit of it in any surface water (ponds, catchements, etc...) it will kill ALL of your frogs. I will now only use it with a 1" paint brush and paint it on cut ends.

You won't be able to pull it out with a chain and truck. Mesquite is like a carrot, a bit on top and big, long freakin roots on the bottom. You have to cut it down at least 12" below surface to keep the roots from growing a new top. It also gets a lot of grit in the wood, so it's hard on chain saw chains. Good luck!
midmo  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 1:15:36 AM EST
Originally Posted By microsuck1:
I dont need them to dissapear quickly, just want them to die, so next season I can pull them out and use for firewood. I was thinking drill a 1/2 inch hole in the trunk diagonally and fill with diesel. I dont want to waste time chainsawing them. I also have a 4x4 diesel HD dually truck and chain, but not sure how big a tree can be yanked out with that.


If you're going to cut them up into firewood, you're going to have to chainsaw them eventually. I'd cut 'em down and dress the stump with Tordon to kill the root.
Covertness  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 2:01:45 AM EST
Originally Posted By EvilVaquero:
Grow them as large as you can (BIG) then cut them down, and sell the wood. When properly cured, mesquite wood will make pistol grips that are outa this world. The wood is considered an exotic and worth big bucks. Just sayin.


This. The woodworker in me weeps as your thought to cut down beautiful wood just to burn.
midmo  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 2:25:40 AM EST
Originally Posted By Covertness:
Originally Posted By EvilVaquero:
Grow them as large as you can (BIG) then cut them down, and sell the wood. When properly cured, mesquite wood will make pistol grips that are outa this world. The wood is considered an exotic and worth big bucks. Just sayin.


This. The woodworker in me weeps as your thought to cut down beautiful wood just to burn.


Geography sucks. We burn tons of black walnut here in Missouri.

TxRabbitBane  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 2:56:39 AM EST
Originally Posted By Covertness:
Originally Posted By EvilVaquero:
Grow them as large as you can (BIG) then cut them down, and sell the wood. When properly cured, mesquite wood will make pistol grips that are outa this world. The wood is considered an exotic and worth big bucks. Just sayin.


This. The woodworker in me weeps as your thought to cut down beautiful wood just to burn.


I burn about half a ton of mesquite a year... your art may be woodworking, but mine is BBQ
338winmag  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 9:38:46 AM EST
Originally Posted By 1fromtx:
Remedy and Diesel.

I've been taking them out all summer.

You need to apply it when the temps are above 77-78,I think. The hotter it is the better.

It's not cheap though, bout $80 + a gal. Directions say use 3 oz per gal. I use 4 oz.per gal.


This is your answer.

1. Mix it up per the directions.

2. Spray from the ground up about 18" all the way around the trunk.

3. Mark it with some cheap spray paint so you don't do it again.

4. Profit.

Next up... Prickly pear
TxRabbitBane  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 9:48:09 AM EST
Originally Posted By 338winmag:

Next up... Prickly pear


You have no idea how many hours I've spent toting a pear burner around... damn sometimes I thank my lucky stars I have a job indoors....
jungp  [Member]
11/2/2011 9:53:39 AM EST
Originally Posted By midmo:
Originally Posted By Covertness:
Originally Posted By EvilVaquero:
Grow them as large as you can (BIG) then cut them down, and sell the wood. When properly cured, mesquite wood will make pistol grips that are outa this world. The wood is considered an exotic and worth big bucks. Just sayin.


This. The woodworker in me weeps as your thought to cut down beautiful wood just to burn.


Geography sucks. We burn tons of black walnut here in Missouri.



Really. Figured black walnut slabs are quite expensive. Just check out ebay.

microsuck1  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 10:28:56 AM EST
The problem is that I dont want a bunch of stumps in the ground to trip over or pop my tires. I was planing on killing them with poison, then busting them out with a chain next year when they are good and dead (dry).

midmo  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 10:31:13 AM EST
Originally Posted By jungp:
Originally Posted By midmo:
Originally Posted By Covertness:
Originally Posted By EvilVaquero:
Grow them as large as you can (BIG) then cut them down, and sell the wood. When properly cured, mesquite wood will make pistol grips that are outa this world. The wood is considered an exotic and worth big bucks. Just sayin.


This. The woodworker in me weeps as your thought to cut down beautiful wood just to burn.


Geography sucks. We burn tons of black walnut here in Missouri.



Really. Figured black walnut slabs are quite expensive. Just check out ebay.



Yup. it's all relative. There's definitely money to be made with a nice stand of lumber-grade walnut, even here in Missouri, but a lot of it gets cut as firewood, too. Same thing goes for mesquite. I see an 8"x4"x42" mesquite slab on ebay right now for $39. A similarly sized slab of walnut is listed at $17.50. There are a lot of variables, but I guess the point is that where you live makes a huge difference in the price and desirability of any particular species of lumber.

1fromtx  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 11:12:53 AM EST
A chain alone wouldn't work.
They have a massive root system and you would either snap the chain or tear the smaller branches off as the chain slipped off.

I would cut the tree down about 2ft above the ground, and spray it.

If shoots start appearing spray again.

Wait till next fall dig down below the ground ciut the stump below
ground spray now wait till end of spring or the start of summer shave the top of the stump one more time and spray again, the.next day cover the stump back up.
You still might have to spray a time or two, especially if its a large tree. These things are tuff nut Remedy will get the job done.

I'll see if I can find some pics to show you what these things look like underground.

Grubbing by hand with a grubbing hoe or a backhoe is about your only other option and the machines will tear your property up, and grubbing ny hand takes a while and takes a toll on your back.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
TxRabbitBane  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 11:13:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By microsuck1:
The problem is that I dont want a bunch of stumps in the ground to trip over or pop my tires. I was planing on killing them with poison, then busting them out with a chain next year when they are good and dead (dry).



deep ass roots on mesquite trees of any size... you'll break a few chains doing this

dig 'em out, burn 'em out... only way to go
338winmag  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 12:55:40 PM EST
Stumps. No problem. Let me see if I can spell it out for you.



ANFO

itsARanchrifle  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 3:13:56 PM EST
I need to tag this.
338winmag  [Team Member]
11/2/2011 3:28:15 PM EST
Remedy works on prickly pear too.
mikkelibob  [Member]
11/2/2011 3:55:12 PM EST
+1 to 4oz Remedy per gallon of diesel. If you can, add hylite dye to a diesel jerry can a week or so before you spray, and you can see where you sprayed for a few months. That way you can go back and spray what you missed. If its less than 3 or 4" diameter, you can wait a year or 18 months and kick it over with a steel toe boot. It does kinda work on prickly pair, but in my experience it takes almost 2 years to really kill it.

Incidentally this summer I collected some mesquite pods and ground up some flour with my Country Living grain mill. I cooked up some wheat/mesquite pancakes. Tasty.
1fromtx  [Team Member]
11/5/2011 10:18:37 PM EST
EDIT:
Sorry, I screwed up the pic's some how, but fixed them.



Here are a few pic's of what were doing.
I had to spray most of these a couple of times. The previous owners had cut the trees down even with the ground, some of these will have 1-3 foot diameter stumps.



Getting things ready to cut down the trees and spray the stumps again.

Leaving a little of the stump up to spray


Me spraying with a backpack rig.


Expanding the garden area. The heat got it this year but I'm trying to stay positive and expand it.


My son digging around one on a fence line. Trusty Grubbing Hoe on the ground with him.



Couple of additions doing what they do best.

Fenced area is the original garden area.


A before shot by the garden.

This is another area that has an old chicken coop. Lots of Mesquites in all the careless weeds. The careless weeds are a pain in the butt!


Area by the Chicken Coop almost done.


Part of the interior fence, want to keep it clear of both brush and Mesquites.



It's a lot of work but you can control them. I'm not sure how many trees your wanting to get rid of but a gal. of Remedy will stretch out it you work it right.

goldtop  [Team Member]
11/6/2011 7:14:13 AM EST
Originally Posted By 338winmag:
Originally Posted By 1fromtx:
Remedy and Diesel.

I've been taking them out all summer.

You need to apply it when the temps are above 77-78,I think. The hotter it is the better.

It's not cheap though, bout $80 + a gal. Directions say use 3 oz per gal. I use 4 oz.per gal.


This is your answer.

1. Mix it up per the directions.

2. Spray from the ground up about 18" all the way around the trunk.

3. Mark it with some cheap spray paint so you don't do it again.

4. Profit.

Next up... Prickly pear



Tordon kills pear.
oldrock  [Member]
11/6/2011 7:26:27 AM EST
chainsaw and coat exposed stump and then wait several months to get the stump out. At our BOL we had lots of mesquite and that was the ticket for us. We tried a couple shortly after chainsawing using a small tractor and chain with zero sucess. Those mesquite trees are just too tough. As for the wood for carving... shame I didn't think of this as we burned off several big piles of mature mesquite trees. We could have easily enough cut out some nice thick trunks and saved them. Only thing we use mesquite for in texas is bbq and I like the smaller limbs for that because they are easy to cut into chunks.
Corporal_Chaos  [Team Member]
11/6/2011 12:18:29 PM EST
Originally Posted By 1fromtx:
Here are a few pic's of what I'm doing.
I had to spray most of these a couple of times. The previous owners had cut the trees down even with the ground, some of these will have 1-3 foot diameter stumps.


Getting things ready to cut down the trees and spray the stumps again.


Leaving a little of the stump up to spray


Me spraying with a backpack rig.


Expanding the garden area. The heat got it this year but I'm trying to stay positive and expand it.


My son digging around one on a fence line. Trusty Grubbing Hoe on the ground with him.



Couple of additions doing what they do best.


Fenced area is the original garden area.


A before shot by the garden.


This is another area that has an old chicken coop. Lots of Mesquites in all the careless weeds. The careless weeds are a pain in the butt!


Area by the Chicken Coop almost done.


Part of the interior fence, want to keep it clear of both brush and Mesquites.



It's a lot of work but you can control them. I'm not sure how many trees your wanting to get rid of but a gal. of Remedy will stretch out it you work it right.



buckmeister  [Team Member]
11/7/2011 9:57:12 AM EST
Looks like West Texas (miles and miles of miles and miles), where mesquite bushes are the only "tree" around. The mesquite combined with the cactus makes walking through some of the land impossible.

buckmeister
TxRabbitBane  [Team Member]
11/7/2011 10:07:12 AM EST
sounds like the cheapest solutions would be:

1. relatives who work for free + talache/grubbin' hoe
2. crew of undocumented workers + talaches/grubbin' hoes
microsuck1  [Team Member]
11/7/2011 11:00:30 AM EST
Your land looks exactly like mine FYI.
338winmag  [Team Member]
11/7/2011 11:56:03 AM EST
How big is your building?
1fromtx  [Team Member]
11/7/2011 3:27:29 PM EST
Originally Posted By buckmeister:
Looks like West Texas (miles and miles of miles and miles), where mesquite bushes are the only "tree" around. The mesquite combined with the cactus makes walking through some of the land impossible.

buckmeister


Yea, there are Live Oak, Pecan, Cottonwood and others, but I got Mesquite,
But I have plenty of firewood and wood for BBQ's
I hate cactus but I would rather deal with the Prickly Pear than the Jumping Cactus.
I'm taking as much of the cactus out as I can. The cactus will be a constant work in progress.
All cactus does is attract rodents which burrow underneath for protection, they attract the rattle snakes which eat them and then move in the burrow,

Dragged this one out from under the house one day when I got in from work.
It started rattling when I shut the truck door.
It had just eaten a large rat and crawled under the house to digest in the cool.



Originally Posted By TxRabbitBane:
sounds like the cheapest solutions would be:

1. relatives who work for free + talache/grubbin' hoe
2. crew of undocumented workers + talaches/grubbin' hoes




Originally Posted By microsuck1:
Your land looks exactly like mine FYI.


Hey we could be neighbors.


Originally Posted By 338winmag:
How big is your building?


It's 30x30 with a 20 ft awing on the other side. It's about 16-17 ft tall inside.
TxRabbitBane  [Team Member]
11/8/2011 6:49:30 AM EST
Originally Posted By 1fromtx:

Originally Posted By TxRabbitBane:
sounds like the cheapest solutions would be:

1. relatives who work for free + talache/grubbin' hoe
2. crew of undocumented workers + talaches/grubbin' hoes



I grew up as #1, and often worked with #2. You know the difference between my status as a worker in my teen years and a wetback? The wetbacks got paid.
wildearp  [Team Member]
11/8/2011 7:15:02 AM EST
Originally Posted By TxRabbitBane:
Originally Posted By Covertness:
Originally Posted By EvilVaquero:
Grow them as large as you can (BIG) then cut them down, and sell the wood. When properly cured, mesquite wood will make pistol grips that are outa this world. The wood is considered an exotic and worth big bucks. Just sayin.


This. The woodworker in me weeps as your thought to cut down beautiful wood just to burn.


I burn about half a ton of mesquite a year... your art may be woodworking, but mine is BBQ


Amen. Mesquite trees are like weeds here.

It is hard for me to belive a man would pass up an excuse to buy a chainsaw.
microsuck1  [Team Member]
11/15/2011 11:57:04 AM EST
EDIT:

I tried the truck and chain method this weekend with great success. I ripped up one tree by the roots, about 6-7" in diameter. I took out another dozen trees, all 5" diameter or so, but they broke off at the base. I know they will be back again, but for now, I have a clear view, and it took me less than 30 minutes. Supprisingly easy. Put it in 4-wheel LOW, and then took out the slack in the chain. Slowly rolled the throttle in 1st gear and never had to go above 1k rpm :)
flyinreallyhigh  [Member]
11/20/2011 2:23:11 AM EST
do yourself a favor, screw actually trying to remove the stump

cut the tree down at the ground, buy a big bottle of KNO3, Potassium Nitrate, AKA saltpeter, drill some holes in the stump as deep as you can, then pour the KNO3 into them and let it soak in every day for a couple of weeks. then light it on fire. The KNO3, turns the wood into pulp but it also soaks the wood in oxygen so it will burn underground. It will smolder all the way to the tips of the roots.

presto chango, no stump no more
Nick_Adams314  [Team Member]
11/21/2011 6:41:25 PM EST
Mixed results with Remedy for me...

Tried high volume remedy and water foliar spray (all over the leaves and the whole plant), and got maybe 30% permanent kill. Most of it died, but a lot came back from the roots a year or two later.

Running maybe 80% permanent kill with remedy and diesel basal spray (around the base of the trunk). Been doing it in august and september and it is working ok, but not 100%.

Actually had really bad luck with chainsawing and painting straight remedy on the stumps! Did my whole tank dam that way, and had maybe 20% permanent kill, which was disappointing. Maybe remedy and diesel would be better than straight remedy for cut stump? (Diesel might help it penetrate better?)

And to the OP, straight diesel doesnt do crap. I tried it as a a cut stump treatment once, and got basically zero permanent kill....

I actually have some mesquites near my barn that I cut and sprayed with diesel, and they came back, then I sprayed them with foliar rememdy and water and they came back, then I cut them and painted them with remedy and they came back, and then i did the remedy basal spray and *finally* stopped most of them....

1fromtx  [Team Member]
11/22/2011 2:27:18 PM EST
If your spraying a mature mesquite, one that has the rough bark, it will take several treatments.
If it's a young one once will probably get it but you might have to retreat.

Mesquites are a tough tree to kill. Short of grubbing it out by machine or by hand I don't think there is an easy sure fire way to kill them.
I'm leaving the stumps above ground till spring and I'm going to retreat them then and just to be anal I'm going to semi-grub them below ground and then re-treat once more before covering. This is including the ones the previous owner just off ground level and then had the " shoots " come out.

The young ones I spay usually die after one treatment.

There tough but not invincible.
mikkelibob  [Member]
11/23/2011 2:59:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By Nick_Adams314:
Running maybe 80% permanent kill with remedy and diesel basal spray (around the base of the trunk). Been doing it in august and september and it is working ok, but not 100%.


I usually let them sit for a good 6+ months. It takes time, especially the bigger ones. The next year you can just kick over the 1" diameter ones with a steel toed boot.
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