AR15.Com Archives
 Canning on a propane burner
BennyFranklin  [Member]
9/2/2011 9:01:06 AM
Anyone do this and what are you using?

I've got the tall Presto canner and the manual says nothing more than 12,000 BTU. I don't know how many BTU it takes to be in the 10lb range when canning but obviously I'd need something that was adjustable enough to keep it in the zone.

As a secondary use it'd be nice to use for my wok and not smoke the house up...

Everything I see talks about huge BTU numbers and no discussion of how low it can be adjusted.

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Feral  [Moderator]
9/2/2011 9:12:50 AM
We can on several different propane rigs. It's the only way to go, IMO.

One caveat, FWIW.....I believe it'll void your Presto's warranty as they say the propane burners can warp the canner. Or maybe that was Mirro?

You can dial the heat down on most propane burners but some do run pretty hot. Avoid the "jet style" in favor of one that has an actual burner. Having a lot of BTUs at your disposal can be useful if you run big water bath canners and consequently I prefer high pressure burners.
DUX4LIFE  [Member]
9/2/2011 9:19:54 AM
I purchased a natural gas burner and replaced the one in the turkey fryer stand with nat. gas. Now I can in my garage and no longer need to buy the tanks. It is much cheaper but still not as portable as propane. The burner is safe for the canners but I think it still could warp them if your not careful.
DUX4LIFE  [Member]
9/2/2011 9:20:34 AM
EDIT...Dbl tap...
Guilty  [Member]
9/2/2011 12:34:57 PM
I use a Camp Chef dual burner propane stove for canning, it is easy to set-up and use, works great, and has adjustable temperature control.
BennyFranklin  [Member]
9/2/2011 12:41:47 PM
Originally Posted By Feral:
We can on several different propane rigs. It's the only way to go, IMO.

One caveat, FWIW.....I believe it'll void your Presto's warranty as they say the propane burners can warp the canner. Or maybe that was Mirro?

You can dial the heat down on most propane burners but some do run pretty hot. Avoid the "jet style" in favor of one that has an actual burner. Having a lot of BTUs at your disposal can be useful if you run big water bath canners and consequently I prefer high pressure burners.


I don't recall the warranty bit, but the Presto is definitely thinner material so I could see it.

What I guess I need to do is call some of the manufacturers to see if they have a min rating on some units. A couple of the regular cast high pressure units have such high BTU ratings I'm worried there won't be enough fine adjustment when I need to dial down.
Waldo  [Moderator]
9/2/2011 3:48:41 PM

I use the side burner on my grill most of the time. It's bigger than most, but low pressure. No problem running a load in my All American.

You really don't have to throw a huge amount of heat into those canners all at once if you start out with hot tap water, let it come to a boil empty, then load it. You just don't have to heat a huge amount of water with a pressure canner.

Not like making beer where you have to bring 7.5 gallons to a boil. An afterburning jet engine would be nice for that sort of thing.

palmetto  [Team Member]
9/2/2011 3:52:46 PM
Used the little two-burner propane camp stove (Harbor Frieght?) to do fig preserves today. It was a little hard to keep the fire low enough no to scorch without a wind gust blowing the flame out. It worked great for boiling the big kettle with jars and lids.

My idea for the future is to put a piece of grate material (refinery catwalk) between the burner and the pot to help control the heat. Never used this rig with a pressure canner.
klutz347  [Team Member]
9/2/2011 7:10:22 PM
I do water baths on a turkey fryer. Works great getting the water up to a boil fast. I haven't used a pressure canner on it yet.

I may try my propane 2 burner camp stove with the pressure canner as I can turn the flame way down if needed.
pedaler  [Member]
9/2/2011 8:18:07 PM
I run my pressure (Mirro) and water bath canners on a 55,000 BTU burner turned down low. To get things hot I might run it at 70%.

You have to be easy as you can run the canners too hard. I've experienced liquid loss from fast changes in temp in a pressure canner and fear that a mayo jar was going to blow when it came out of a water bath. For all the mayo jar haters, this was the ONLY time I considered maybe I was wrong in using the jars.

This is my 5th canning season on the burner.
gruntsoldier  [Member]
9/3/2011 12:01:58 AM
presto definitely says to not can on a propane burners. its right in the little book that comes with them. i still know lots of folks who do it though.
tnwalker10  [Team Member]
9/3/2011 8:05:45 AM
My mom and step-dad have done it for decades. I don't know anything about their pressure canner or burner, but they've canned 2 or 3 hundred quarts of beans and tomatoes a year since about 1980.

They do it on the back porch so it won't heat up the house.
REELDOC  [Team Member]
9/3/2011 8:18:01 AM
Originally Posted By gruntsoldier:
presto definitely says to not can on a propane burners. its right in the little book that comes with them. i still know lots of folks who do it though.


Heat is heat............. That is a legal beagal CYA thing for foks that need protecting from themselves.

As with anything one does concerning pressure and stuff that can blow up in your face you have to pay attention to the amount of heat you need to do the job. You can't leave a pressure canner unattended on a campfire, wood stove, electric stove, gas stove, propane burner or any other type of heating device..After I get water boiling under a pressure canner I rarely have the flame above a flicker to keep the pressure up and even have trouble at that flame height keeping the burner from blowing out.

My canners may blow up in my face tomorrow but it will not be because I applied so much heat that it couldn't take it, or because I heated the aluminum to its plastic deformation point and caused possible warpage.

Check all your safety valves, seals and gauges every year and replace as necessary.
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