AR15.Com Archives
 ITT: Outfittig a tornado shelter
ex_dsmr  [Team Member]
5/16/2012 11:57:44 AM EST
Well the excavator just loaded up and ive already got the itch to start customizing.
Some things id like to get accomplished are:

-running power
-running hard phone line with the possibility of having an internet connection
- backup power supply
- storage
- antennas for my scanner and possibly TV
-electric fan to keep air circulating

My main concerns are being able to monitor current radar while we are in our hidey hole. Growing up we had an old B&W TV that was hard to see and you relied upon the station to show you radar. My laptop would serve as both communication to the outside world as well as real time weather and news updates. Through my scanner I can pick up everything from FEMA to police/ems/fire, to HAM. Id like run a dipole or something of the like but it'd be preferable if I could have it in both the house and in the shelter. Which brings us to storage. The unit we bought is a little 6x8 so its not very big. There is myself, my wife, our young child, and 2 dogs to get in there- so space is paramount. If anyone has details or especially pictures about shelves or other handy tips that'd be great. At the peak of the roof its about 6' or so. We being small people we have some head room to work with and arent opposed to utilizing some of the overhead space that would otherwise go to waste- especially near the ceiling on the walls.

Keep in mind that im well aware of the actual time spent in a shelter: its likley to be anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour at most. However, during that time id like to remain plugged in to the world and what's going on around us. Id also like to remain as comfortable as one can be in a concrete box without having clutter everywhere and being overly cramped for space.

Id also like to keep the temps in it down as much as possible. The door is steel. Is there anything I can put on the concrete or on the door to keep it a little cooler in there during the summer. Id like to get most of the bulk ammo out of my home and store it down there. I dont want the heat killing that or any of the other supplies ive got stored down there.
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Storm_Tracker  [Team Member]
5/16/2012 3:23:19 PM EST
Im going to watch the show in the distance, from my vehicle. I will be there to help you out and let you know when its all over. ; )

lol
ISED8U  [Team Member]
5/16/2012 3:26:47 PM EST
Sounds like you have a substantial structure. I had one of the "in the garage floor" shelters installed earlier this year. I posted a thread and got a lot of good suggestions fr things to stock in it.

One of the things I did was to get the exact coordinates of my home/shelter and write them on the wall inside the shelter. In the event I became trapped and there are no street signs, I want to be able to radio my position to someone so they can dig me out. Just a thought.

eta: A link to my thread
The_Beer_Slayer  [Site Staff]
5/16/2012 4:27:37 PM EST
extrication tools in the event things cave in around you and you need to cut your way out. ham radio to call for help in the event you are trapped.
MidwestJ  [Member]
5/16/2012 5:23:07 PM EST
After observing the damage In Joplin, Mo last year first hand, I whole heartedly SECOND the extraction tools.

First chance I got I purchased a heavy duty "rock bar" for prying. Might get yourself a Halligan tool as well.
EXPY37  [Team Member]
5/16/2012 9:52:39 PM EST
Subscribe to WeatherTap.com for almost realtime wx in great detail.

Also subscribe to WxWorx for sat delivered, essentially realtime, wx. The antenna is the same as an XM radio antenna, tiny. Also in great detail.



Storm_Tracker  [Team Member]
5/16/2012 10:03:41 PM EST

Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Subscribe to WeatherTap.com for almost realtime wx in great detail.

Also subscribe to WxWorx for sat delivered, essentially realtime, wx. The antenna is the same as an XM radio antenna, tiny. Also in great detail.



you forgot to mention the $900 price tag for the hardware...

Get Gr level3 for $89, it is the standard for storm chasers. It needs internet data for the feed though.

ETA: If youre using ipad, iphone, Radarscope is the most widely used radar application for chasing.
EXPY37  [Team Member]
5/16/2012 10:27:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By Storm_Tracker:

Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Subscribe to WeatherTap.com for almost realtime wx in great detail.

Also subscribe to WxWorx for sat delivered, essentially realtime, wx. The antenna is the same as an XM radio antenna, tiny. Also in great detail.



you forgot to mention the $900 price tag for the hardware...

Get Gr level3 for $89, it is the standard for storm chasers. It needs internet data for the feed though.

ETA: If youre using ipad, iphone, Radarscope is the most widely used radar application for chasing.



Look on ebay, much less.

Storm_Tracker  [Team Member]
5/16/2012 11:26:37 PM EST

Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Originally Posted By Storm_Tracker:

Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Subscribe to WeatherTap.com for almost realtime wx in great detail.

Also subscribe to WxWorx for sat delivered, essentially realtime, wx. The antenna is the same as an XM radio antenna, tiny. Also in great detail.



you forgot to mention the $900 price tag for the hardware...

Get Gr level3 for $89, it is the standard for storm chasers. It needs internet data for the feed though.

ETA: If youre using ipad, iphone, Radarscope is the most widely used radar application for chasing.



Look on ebay, much less.


yeah if you watch you can probably buy an older model used one in the $400 range. The master mariner data package is what I use and it is $55 a month. I use it about 2-3 months out of the year and turn it off rest of the year


Calhoun123  [Member]
5/17/2012 2:13:23 AM EST
We have had to spend hours hunkered down in the past. What are you going to do about seating and bedding for the child? I don't know if I would bring the dogs in unless I truly expected to be in and out in under 30 minutes.
The_Beer_Slayer  [Site Staff]
5/17/2012 5:19:12 AM EST
get a ham radio and listen to local storm spotter repeaters. info will be quicker than tv/radio. there are a metric shitload of FREE radar packages available for pc/android/iphone devices that will be perfectly suitable for the average joe. 99% of people simply don't need the high dollar radar reporting systems. excellent information is available for free if you just look for it.
ex_dsmr  [Team Member]
5/17/2012 7:00:00 AM EST
Originally Posted By Storm_Tracker:
Im going to watch the show in the distance, from my vehicle. I will be there to help you out and let you know when its all over. ; )

lol


What's your frequency?

Originally Posted By ISED8U:
Sounds like you have a substantial structure. I had one of the "in the garage floor" shelters installed earlier this year. I posted a thread and got a lot of good suggestions fr things to stock in it.

One of the things I did was to get the exact coordinates of my home/shelter and write them on the wall inside the shelter. In the event I became trapped and there are no street signs, I want to be able to radio my position to someone so they can dig me out. Just a thought.

eta: A link to my thread


Thats a good idea. The guy who dropped it off and did the actual install said that in some areas you can get your local response group to GPS mark the location of your shelter incase its so covered up with debris that nobody knows its there. And its an excellent mindset in addition to the mentioned extraction tools.

To that end, Ive seen jacks that you can buy that will lift several thousand pounds when leveraged against the door. Its something ill deffinately be looking into. I did set the shelter out about 60 feet or so out from the house to alleviate this concern somewhat but nothing ever goes according to plan.

Originally Posted By Calhoun123:
We have had to spend hours hunkered down in the past. What are you going to do about seating and bedding for the child? I don't know if I would bring the dogs in unless I truly expected to be in and out in under 30 minutes.


We have cots and fold up chairs. Shes 15 months old right now so plenty small to sit in mom and dads lap or crash on the bed.
Regarding the mutts, they are well behaved and we always brought our dogs down growing up without incident. The wife's dog will end up in its kennel anyways.

Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer:
get a ham radio and listen to local storm spotter repeaters. info will be quicker than tv/radio. there are a metric shitload of FREE radar packages available for pc/android/iphone devices that will be perfectly suitable for the average joe. 99% of people simply don't need the high dollar radar reporting systems. excellent information is available for free if you just look for it.


I mostly rely on wunderground.com for my radar. Also, the local fox 4 website offers up real-time broadcast on their website so its the same as what youd get on TV complete with the news team and meterologists.
I may end up getting my ticket but as I said before regarding HAM, I can pick it up on my scanner, I just need to get an outside antenna set up. I do a fair ammout of eavesdropping and found the "unofficial" RACES/ARES weather guys for my county. Every time the weather starts acting up they are there to give plenty of info.

I did find out that the wireless in the house wont reach out with the door closed. Ill either have to get a receiver antenena or figure out a way to get another router from ATT to put in the shelter.


So does anyone have any creative storage ideas? Im pretty handy with a welder so shelves would be no issue- just need some inspiration.
Also, back to the heat issue, im going to have to do something. Went out last night and even after dark the concrete was warm and it was HOT inside. Moving air around will only do so well. Im going to need some sort of coating on the thing if im going to keep much down there in the way of food/water and especially ammo. Ive considered heaping more dirt over the entire thing and covering the concrete roof. The door face sits at a 45* angle. Ill try and get some pics up later this evening or tomorrow. The only thing that concerms me about heaping dirt over it is ants. I dont want to end up with them nesting all over the thing and coming down the vents. I guess worse comes to worse I can keep the area doused in pesticide.

I DO have one usefull thing to add for others. I read where someone got a large map of their state/area and mounted it on the wall of the shelter behind some plexi. That way you dont have to guess or visualize where storms may be. You can write on it if need be as well, and best of all its out of the way and protected. Granted this was suggested by someone in Japan where they track typhoons (hurricanes) for a few days but still seems a useful idea if only as a backup method should your radar/internet go down.
abinok  [Member]
5/17/2012 11:34:12 AM EST
I would certanly cover it with dirt.

The biggest problem youre going to have isn't the space its the heat. Our shelter right now is 6 degrees cooler than our house due to earth cooling. My wife and our two toddlers were in a friends shelter (a 8x8 with 5 adults and 4 kids in it) for 10 minutes and the heat made it hard to breathe. Our shelter has carpet, walls painted to match the kids bedroom backup power and a dvd player among other things. If im not home and there is a risk of weather at night she can take the boys down, let them watch a movie, and put them to bed, then play online untill she is ready to crash. 24" shelving makes handy bunks. She wouldn't even consider something like that in out friends shelter... because if the heat.
ex_dsmr  [Team Member]
5/17/2012 12:58:21 PM EST
Abinok, the more I think about it the more I like the idea of just covering it up. I called the MFG to see if they had heard of any other ideas to combat heat and one of the guys actually told me to cover up the vent and turbine as they were letting hot air in. I breifley tried to explain that I can feel the heat through the concrete and you could cook an egg on the steel door but he was unconvinced. I thanked him and did a face palm, I wasnt about to get into a discussion about how the turbine would actually be getting RID of the hot air and it was hotter inside the shelter than it was outside. I think a fan will help somewhat when its in use as Murphy's first law of storm shelter dynamics is the wind will stop blowing the turbine at precicley the same time you have everyone sealed inside- but for now ive got to keep the heat from getting so bad initially.

It sure sounds like youve got a nice setup accessable from the house and quite a large one? Ive considered painting the inside to be a little more "calming" for everyone.

Another thing I thought off after a co-worker jokingly suggested that I install a periscope...what about a camera? There are no windows in this thing and we could get somewhat of an idea what is going on outside. If there ends up being debris on the door it MIGHT help if we can see what we're working with. All this if it survives a hit of course.

I dont want this only to be ideas for me, but a thread others can use as well. I spend lots of time searching for all sorts of ideas on a variety of sites and its nice to come across a gold mine of ideas.
abinok  [Member]
5/17/2012 1:58:49 PM EST
From the way you have described it so far I'm assuming you have a storm cellar that is essentially a septic tank with a door on the top at an angle. If that's the case, it should have no problem with 14" of soil on top. Give some thought to how to raise the vents. I would also recommend you have a look at bilge fans to ventilate with.most of them will move 300 cfm or more, which will keep humidity from getting artifically high due to the occupants. If you've never heard of it before, there is a book that is a relic of the cold war that will be very helpful. Google "nuclear war survival skills" there is lots of info found therein concerning ventilating shelters.
My cellar is 12x12, but a portion of that is occupied by stairs, and a wall seperating them from the main area. The main area is about 12' by 9' with a 7' ceiling. I have a flat door that is level with the floor of the workshop its inside of, and another concrete door at the bottom. I accomplish my ventilation by setting up differential pressure using a 16" box fan, and simple dryer ducting. The shelter air discharges into the workshop, and is cool enough that I hang plastic sheeting from the ceiling joists around my workbench to enjoy the frosty air when I'm working in the summer.

I realize I neglected the main point of your question since your shelter is essentially unuseable due to heat.
I have folding chairs, and a card table in our shelter. A set of heavy duty shelves that are wide enough to double as bunks for the Kiddos. It's wired for grid power and lit with 110v led rope lights. I believe I've got 3 strings in there. If we don't have grid power I can flip the breakers in the house on the way out, and at the pole, and backfeed using a 2kw generator I keep in the wellhouse. It's a cinder block building 2 feet from the workshop. That buys 9 hours of juice on 1 tank. I also built a battery box last fall that allows me to run the fan and lights for several hours if the need arises. Google my screen name and battery box and it will pop up. There are better examples than mine.
The cramped space means everything needs to serve as many uses as possible, and be as small as possible. A bench integrating buckets in the bottom for storage is easy, cheap, and pretty comfortable. I'm planning to add a table hinged to one wall soon. We also have a bucket with a toilet lid, and a hanging privacy screen. Another bucket catches wash water. I've got some aquatainers down there for water.

There's a bottle jack and lumber for cribbing down there as well, but the real plan is to inform the appropriate people beforehand to ensure a 14000 lb tractor with a loader is on the way. Have a contact in the area who is in the area, but not likley to be affected by the same storm to come to your aid. Have a frs/gmrs radio setup and a designated channel setup. In may of 1999 I had 8 friends and family loose houses in the "may third" tornado. One of those were trapped in their above ground safe room because everybody thought they were gone. A $15 Walmart radio fixes that problem. We were on site in less than 10 minutes with equipment. It was the next day before before anyone even started looking for them. My friends and family will call and check on each other after a storm with tornados comes through. If I haven't heard from somebody in an hour or two, I start loading up gear to go check on them and start digging them out. It's also easier to get text messages out during and after storms than phone calls. Knowing how to update social media networks VIA text is also useful, provided you use them.
The_Beer_Slayer  [Site Staff]
5/17/2012 2:46:45 PM EST
Originally Posted By ex_dsmr:
Originally Posted By Storm_Tracker:
Im going to watch the show in the distance, from my vehicle. I will be there to help you out and let you know when its all over. ; )

lol


What's your frequency?

Originally Posted By ISED8U:
Sounds like you have a substantial structure. I had one of the "in the garage floor" shelters installed earlier this year. I posted a thread and got a lot of good suggestions fr things to stock in it.

One of the things I did was to get the exact coordinates of my home/shelter and write them on the wall inside the shelter. In the event I became trapped and there are no street signs, I want to be able to radio my position to someone so they can dig me out. Just a thought.

eta: A link to my thread


Thats a good idea. The guy who dropped it off and did the actual install said that in some areas you can get your local response group to GPS mark the location of your shelter incase its so covered up with debris that nobody knows its there. And its an excellent mindset in addition to the mentioned extraction tools.

To that end, Ive seen jacks that you can buy that will lift several thousand pounds when leveraged against the door. Its something ill deffinately be looking into. I did set the shelter out about 60 feet or so out from the house to alleviate this concern somewhat but nothing ever goes according to plan.

Originally Posted By Calhoun123:
We have had to spend hours hunkered down in the past. What are you going to do about seating and bedding for the child? I don't know if I would bring the dogs in unless I truly expected to be in and out in under 30 minutes.


We have cots and fold up chairs. Shes 15 months old right now so plenty small to sit in mom and dads lap or crash on the bed.
Regarding the mutts, they are well behaved and we always brought our dogs down growing up without incident. The wife's dog will end up in its kennel anyways.

Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer:
get a ham radio and listen to local storm spotter repeaters. info will be quicker than tv/radio. there are a metric shitload of FREE radar packages available for pc/android/iphone devices that will be perfectly suitable for the average joe. 99% of people simply don't need the high dollar radar reporting systems. excellent information is available for free if you just look for it.


I mostly rely on wunderground.com for my radar. Also, the local fox 4 website offers up real-time broadcast on their website so its the same as what youd get on TV complete with the news team and meterologists.
I may end up getting my ticket but as I said before regarding HAM, I can pick it up on my scanner, I just need to get an outside antenna set up. I do a fair ammout of eavesdropping and found the "unofficial" RACES/ARES weather guys for my county. Every time the weather starts acting up they are there to give plenty of info.

I did find out that the wireless in the house wont reach out with the door closed. Ill either have to get a receiver antenena or figure out a way to get another router from ATT to put in the shelter.




the main reason i mention ham is it will also give you the ability cal call for help in the event your injured or trapped inside. Also make sure you register your shelter with the local pd/fd so they know where it is and to check it in the event of a disaster. we had a few of those here that were not and they were not found for a couple of days.

food is good but water is a MUST. consider being stuck for a day or 2 in a concrete box in 80+ weather and 75% humidity. even under ground it's going to be hot and miserable. they odds of getting stuck may be small but it happens enough to plan for it. also a wind up radio vs battery is a good option. batts are always dead when you need them and these require little to no maint when stored. in the event you NEED that shelter you can bet that your power and wifi will likely be down. don't plan on it working. also don't count on cell or text messaging. both failed here for better than 48hours in the disaster zones.
ex_dsmr  [Team Member]
5/17/2012 4:57:56 PM EST
Ok, well covering it with dirt is deffinately out, unless I build some sort of mini retaining wall on top and even then im not sure it will help. Where the slope meets the roof is just too close to the door. I fear every time it rains im going to get a wash of mud and nasty water cascading down round the doors.

Its dark now and I didnt snap a shot for for all intents and purposes this is the exact same unit


Food, water, tools, supplies, electronics, etc are all on my list but the first two are no good if I cant keep them at a comfortable temperature. A fan is deffinately in the queue as I remembered what a difference they made growing up. I suppose ill have to install a thermostat or something so it will keep it running in there as needed.
The_Beer_Slayer  [Site Staff]
5/18/2012 2:54:33 AM EST
trust me when i say this... cover as much of it as possible. the f5 that hit tuscaloosa here actually uprooted a shelter that wasn't fully buried. it wasn't carried but it was pulled out of the ground and rolled.

it shouldn't be a big deal to drain it away from the door.
txjim42  [Team Member]
5/18/2012 7:49:48 PM EST
What about building a simple wooden shade structure over it to keep the direct sunlight off as much as possible? Arbor/Trellis/Gazebo or even a carport type thing. Cover it with more dirt, rocks, gravel or something that will grow in the shade...

Why not build a covered deck/patio adjacent to or around it?

Simple misting spray bottle of water and some hand-held fans/cardboard might help w/the cooling aspect.
lukus  [Member]
5/18/2012 8:11:49 PM EST
I agree with the last post. Build a small building on top of it. Garage, carport, pavilion,chicken house - it really doesn't matter. The shade will make a world of difference and you'll have a ground-level covered structure that's good for something else. Just make sure it's big enough to stop most of the days direct sunlight.

I work at a truss company in Austin, TX. If you're in central TX, I can get you a price for roof trusses that will rival the cost of stick framing the roof yourself.

lukus
EXPY37  [Team Member]
5/18/2012 8:26:10 PM EST
The reason it's hot is it isn't buried underground where it's nice and cool. I expect the sun beating on it will make it plenty hot.

Can you exchange it for one that can be buried?

ex_dsmr  [Team Member]
5/20/2012 10:14:33 AM EST
Ok, here is a picture of my actual shelter.





I have thought about putting some sort of wooden structure over it, even if it resembles a small deck. Its already 3' off the ground, the pad is tiny, and its at the very corner of the property- so the chances of putting something functional over it is definitely out. It would be purley for adding 4" or so of materiel between the concrete and the sun to absorb the heat.

Its also come to mind that planting some trees at the base of the mound on both sides may look nice and help provide shade.

And eh,...no, there isnt any chance that im having them come all the way back and exchanging it out.
EXPY37  [Team Member]
5/20/2012 11:00:23 AM EST
Originally Posted By ex_dsmr:
Ok, here is a picture of my actual shelter.

<a href="http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/819/sam0813s.jpg/" target="_blank">http://img819.imageshack.us/img819/6091/sam0813s.jpg</a>



I have thought about putting some sort of wooden structure over it, even if it resembles a small deck. Its already 3' off the ground, the pad is tiny, and its at the very corner of the property- so the chances of putting something functional over it is definitely out. It would be purley for adding 4" or so of materiel between the concrete and the sun to absorb the heat.

Its also come to mind that planting some trees at the base of the mound on both sides may look nice and help provide shade.

And eh,...no, there isnt any chance that im having them come all the way back and exchanging it out.



Well durn...

This a good lesson to plan out all aspects of building a shelter, especially an underground one, before spending days moving dirt making a small pond or other investment.

The only solution I see in your case OP is to uncover it partially, get 2" foundation insulation and lay sheets down at least 2 or 3 feet below grade on sides all around and on top as much as possible and recover. Two layers of insulation would be better and considering the size, not too much would be needed. Then the lower parts of the shelter would help cool it with the ground below 3 or 4 feet acting like a heat sink.

As you say, add shade in any way possible, maybe a small deck extending sufficiently to shade the ground as well as the actual exposed part of the shelter, until you can get trees to mature sufficiently for shade. The insulation, ground sink, and shade will make a BIG difference.

You could rent the smallest mini-excavator and have the insulation job done in a weekend and then really enjoy the shelter. It has a nice setting in the picture!



EXPY37  [Team Member]
5/20/2012 11:14:39 AM EST
An additional solution to isolate the sun's rays from your shelter that would be fast to do would be to cover the small surface of exposed concrete with the vinyl plastic corrigated sheets from a box store.

Use properly sized concrete anchors to attach 18 ga galvanized metal studs horizontally to the exposed concrete and screw the sheets to that letting the assemby extend a couple feet to provide shade and let air flow underneath. A second covering 6" from the first would greatly improve radiant/thermal isolation.

Definately add insulation to the inside and/or outside of the door.

I've got a metal building with an ordinary metal insulated passage door facing directly to the afternoon sun and compared to feeling an area of the bldg that isn't insulated, I've always been surprised how efficient the door is staying cool with the sun beating on it.

So this is a comprehensive solution to your issue!




abinok  [Member]
5/20/2012 11:50:43 AM EST
I would but the money into a retaining wall and dirt. I would make some forms and put a 8" concrete lip around the top and side of the door then bury away. Even with the wall adding cost, the dirt cover will be the most effective method in terms of degrees/$ spent.
EXPY37  [Team Member]
5/20/2012 1:36:13 PM EST
Originally Posted By abinok:
I would but the money into a retaining wall and dirt. I would make some forms and put a 8" concrete lip around the top and side of the door then bury away. Even with the wall adding cost, the dirt cover will be the most effective method in terms of degrees/$ spent.



How are you going to design the footer for a concrete retaining wall considering the area has already been disturbed by the excavation?

Mal_means_bad  [Team Member]
5/20/2012 3:45:02 PM EST
Put in a couple posts, add 8' tall trellises all but surrounding the door, plant some rose bushes, call it good. That will block the sun quite adequately, hide the unsightly door, and isn't substantial enough to block the exit when blown down.

ETA: or false gazebo.
abinok  [Member]
5/20/2012 3:45:30 PM EST
I would drill the shelter, install rebar, and cast it to the existing concrete. I probably wouldn't do a whole lot with the hinge side of the door, but several inches of dirt could be added right now to the back portion of the shelter where the vents are. A small wall on top anchored to the shelter would be easy. You could even use cinder block and fill them with concrete. A wall on the other angled section would be almost as easy.
ex_dsmr  [Team Member]
5/20/2012 4:27:34 PM EST
After pondering it a while ive decided that before I start digging it out and making some rather drastic changes, im going to look inward rather than outward.
Ill likley go down this week to the hardware store and grab some polystyrene insulation panels and affix those to the ceiling and especially the door. By adding 1-1/2"-2" of insulation coupled with a circulation fan (or two) on a thermostat it should keep things well regulated.

Next likley COA is using a treated 4x4 post laid horizontally just above the door as a retaining wall and throwing dirt over the whole roof. That may still leave the door face portion of the shelter open to sunlight exposure but ill just have to live with it. The concrete lip around the door opening is a possibility, I hadnt though of that. I might have to affix some sort of grid to keep the sod/soil in place while it takes hold going down that slope.


On to storage...
Ive figured that a 1'x6' horizontal shelf should be constructed on the back wall out of welded 1" tube. Tabs will be welded for bolting the structure to the wall and ceiling. This will allow for the placement of a laptop, radio, scanner, as well as other provisions. I had another idea to best utilize the space behind the stairs. By constructing shelves that in essence extend in plane with each step and continue back to the wall, there will be good storage for food, batteries, bottled water, diapers, etc. This shouldnt be as heavy gauge and im sure 1/2" tube should suffice.

Here is what im thinking:







abinok  [Member]
5/20/2012 5:01:24 PM EST
Wish I had welding skills

That looks like a very cool start to organizing your hidey hole.
ex_dsmr  [Team Member]
5/21/2012 5:52:49 AM EST
Skills? You give me far too much credit
Lets just say that the welds may be butt ugly but they hold well, and afterall that's what a grinder is for.

We have our first near 100 degree day comming up on Thursday (God help us if its starting this early already). I think ill get a hi-temp reading from the inside for a base line.
joemama74  [Team Member]
5/21/2012 7:51:21 AM EST
Just stick some shrubbery around it. A deck doesn't sound bad either. You could camo the whole thing.

My Dad has one similar to yours, always stays pretty cool.
EXPY37  [Team Member]
5/21/2012 8:53:40 AM EST
Originally Posted By ex_dsmr:
After pondering it a while ive decided that before I start digging it out and making some rather drastic changes, im going to look inward rather than outward.
Ill likley go down this week to the hardware store and grab some polystyrene insulation panels and affix those to the ceiling and especially the door. By adding 1-1/2"-2" of insulation coupled with a circulation fan (or two) on a thermostat it should keep things well regulated.

Next likley COA is using a treated 4x4 post laid horizontally just above the door as a retaining wall and throwing dirt over the whole roof. That may still leave the door face portion of the shelter open to sunlight exposure but ill just have to live with it. The concrete lip around the door opening is a possibility, I hadnt though of that. I might have to affix some sort of grid to keep the sod/soil in place while it takes hold going down that slope.


On to storage...
Ive figured that a 1'x6' horizontal shelf should be constructed on the back wall out of welded 1" tube. Tabs will be welded for bolting the structure to the wall and ceiling. This will allow for the placement of a laptop, radio, scanner, as well as other provisions. I had another idea to best utilize the space behind the stairs. By constructing shelves that in essence extend in plane with each step and continue back to the wall, there will be good storage for food, batteries, bottled water, diapers, etc. This shouldnt be as heavy gauge and im sure 1/2" tube should suffice.

Here is what im thinking:

<a href="http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/809/topshelf.jpg/" target="_blank">http://img809.imageshack.us/img809/4011/topshelf.jpg</a>

<a href="http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/521/stairshelves.jpg/" target="_blank">http://img521.imageshack.us/img521/3669/stairshelves.jpg</a>






Is that water on the floor under the stairs in the pix???

ex_dsmr  [Team Member]
5/21/2012 9:14:18 AM EST
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Originally Posted By ex_dsmr:
After pondering it a while ive decided that before I start digging it out and making some rather drastic changes, im going to look inward rather than outward.
Ill likley go down this week to the hardware store and grab some polystyrene insulation panels and affix those to the ceiling and especially the door. By adding 1-1/2"-2" of insulation coupled with a circulation fan (or two) on a thermostat it should keep things well regulated.

Next likley COA is using a treated 4x4 post laid horizontally just above the door as a retaining wall and throwing dirt over the whole roof. That may still leave the door face portion of the shelter open to sunlight exposure but ill just have to live with it. The concrete lip around the door opening is a possibility, I hadnt though of that. I might have to affix some sort of grid to keep the sod/soil in place while it takes hold going down that slope.


On to storage...
Ive figured that a 1'x6' horizontal shelf should be constructed on the back wall out of welded 1" tube. Tabs will be welded for bolting the structure to the wall and ceiling. This will allow for the placement of a laptop, radio, scanner, as well as other provisions. I had another idea to best utilize the space behind the stairs. By constructing shelves that in essence extend in plane with each step and continue back to the wall, there will be good storage for food, batteries, bottled water, diapers, etc. This shouldnt be as heavy gauge and im sure 1/2" tube should suffice.

Here is what im thinking:

<a href="http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/809/topshelf.jpg/" target="_blank">http://img809.imageshack.us/img809/4011/topshelf.jpg</a>

<a href="http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/521/stairshelves.jpg/" target="_blank">http://img521.imageshack.us/img521/3669/stairshelves.jpg</a>






Is that water on the floor under the stairs in the pix???



Yep, I had just gotten done giving the mound and the whole thing a good dousing with the jet setting around the doors. Weatherstripping is in the plans but its not that high up on my list of worries.

I tried out my store bought UPS yesterday just running the router, modem, and a cordless phone. Took 4.5 hours to pull it down below 10% which IMO is acceptable. For as cheap as it was I may pick up another 1-2. They are handy over the DIY ones as you dont have to worry about gasses or adding chargers, converters, or voltage meters- not to mention the weight is much more acceptable for "grab and go".
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