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 Best pool shock for water purification?
TheMountaineer  [Team Member]
1/22/2012 11:19:02 PM
I'm wanting to build up a small store of pool shock to use for water purification.

I know a couple pounds goes a long way, but I figure if I stock up a decent bit of it, maybe 20 pounds or so, it would also be a great barter/charity item.

Who here prefers what, and why do you like it?
Scout_19Delta  [Member]
1/22/2012 11:49:13 PM
Why not just use bleach? At 6%, two drops per lt goes along way.
BIG_PAPA  [Team Member]
1/22/2012 11:57:47 PM
Originally Posted By Scout_19Delta:
Why not just use bleach? At 6%, two drops per lt goes along way.


Because bleach loses potency over time. Granular shock does not.
Scout_19Delta  [Member]
1/23/2012 12:00:20 AM
Originally Posted By BIG_PAPA:
Originally Posted By Scout_19Delta:
Why not just use bleach? At 6%, two drops per lt goes along way.


Because bleach loses potency over time. Granular shock does not.


Did not know that. Thanks for the info.
GrasshopperNOmore  [Member]
1/23/2012 12:42:31 AM
I'm in for the answer. I know it has to be pure. Most brands incorporate other chemicals for algae and other nasties. I always forget to save the link when someone posts it.
shadawick  [Team Member]
1/23/2012 1:10:52 AM
This is of interest to me!
TheMountaineer  [Team Member]
1/23/2012 1:39:53 AM
Originally Posted By BIG_PAPA:
Originally Posted By Scout_19Delta:
Why not just use bleach? At 6%, two drops per lt goes along way.


Because bleach loses potency over time. Granular shock does not.


Also, it's a much more compact way to store water treatment. When mixed with water, the pool shock makes bleach. A tablespoon of the shock makes a ridiculous amount of bleach - one set of instructions I've seen is close to 400 gallons of bleach per heaping tablespoon
SirSqueeboo  [Life Member]
1/23/2012 1:54:31 AM
Originally Posted By TheMountaineer:
Originally Posted By BIG_PAPA:
Originally Posted By Scout_19Delta:
Why not just use bleach? At 6%, two drops per lt goes along way.


Because bleach loses potency over time. Granular shock does not.


Also, it's a much more compact way to store water treatment. When mixed with water, the pool shock makes bleach. A tablespoon of the shock makes a ridiculous amount of bleach - one set of instructions I've seen is close to 400 gallons of bleach per heaping tablespoon


Oh damn. I need to buy some.
SirSqueeboo  [Life Member]
1/23/2012 2:09:03 AM
Ok, I found this.

http://water.epa.gov/drink/emerprep/emergencydisinfection.cfm

You can use granular calcium hypochlorite to disinfect water.

Add and dissolve one heaping teaspoon of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (approximately ¼ ounce) for each two gallons of water, or 5 milliliters (approximately 7 grams) per 7.5 liters of water. The mixture will produce a stock chlorine solution of approximately 500 milligrams per liter, since the calcium hypochlorite has available chlorine equal to 70 percent of its weight. To disinfect water, add the chlorine solution in the ratio of one part of chlorine solution to each 100 parts of water to be treated. This is roughly equal to adding 1 pint (16 ounces) of stock chlorine to each 12.5 gallons of water or (approximately ½ liter to 50 liters of water) to be disinfected. To remove any objectionable chlorine odor, aerate the disinfected water by pouring it back and forth from one clean container to another.
abinok  [Member]
1/23/2012 3:27:53 AM
Ive been looking for the formula for calculating how much.....

I'm wanting to make some premade containers for field purification in these:

Just add water, and you have 2 oz of instant bleach in a sealed tough container. 2oz of bleach will purify a lot of water.
If you figure 480drops to an ounce, that's weeks of water. I could package a dropper with it pretty easy.
GrasshopperNOmore  [Member]
1/23/2012 4:09:06 AM
Some amazon searching found this:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004DEOPFU/ref=mp_s_a_3?qid=1327309686&sr=8-3

Sorry, hotlinking is a pita on the phone.

Being 100%, I imagine its just as good as any other brand at 100%...? I also remember reading on SB that this stuff should be stored in a glass container well away from other preps because its extremely corrosive.
SandHillsHillbilly  [Team Member]
1/23/2012 4:10:26 AM
There was a long thread here at one time that discussed this in detail.
SandHillsHillbilly  [Team Member]
1/23/2012 4:14:52 AM
Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:
Some amazon searching found this:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004DEOPFU/ref=mp_s_a_3?qid=1327309686&sr=8-3

Sorry, hotlinking is a pita on the phone.

Being 100%, I imagine its just as good as any other brand...? I also remember reading on SB that this stuff should be stored in a glass container well away from other preps because its extremely corrosive.


This will produce 65% available Chlorine. So you will have to adjust the amount you use per gallon. This is very important to obtain the right amount. Some maybe pool shock maybe 70-80% calcium hypochloride give you less available Chlorine. So a little math is going to be necessary according to what you use and how much you want to sterilize.
berto187  [Member]
1/23/2012 5:11:41 AM
http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_10_17/618065_.html
Centuryhouse  [Member]
1/23/2012 12:30:17 PM
The best seems to be LESLIE'S POOL SHOCK, with 73% calcium hypochlorite.

Here are some instructions from using it, that another member put together:

Instructions for disinfecting water: This is a two step process.

1 bag of Leslie's 73% Calcium Hypochlorite Pool Shock

Step 1: Make stock chlorine solution (do not drink this!)
• Filter two gallons water as best you can to remove organic particulate
(build a sand filter or even use a T-shirt).
• Add one heaping *teaspoon* (approx ¼ oz) of calcium hypochlorite to the
two gallons of water. Use a clean dry scoop (dedicated to this use) made
of metal or plastic.
• Stir into solution thoroughly.
• Store this solution in air tight containers (like gallon jugs).

The mixture will produce a stock chlorine solution of approximately 500
milligrams per liter. This is 120 times weaker than standard bleach (which is
60,000 milligrams per liter) but provides a convenient strength for disinfecting
water at a ratio of 1:100. This stock chlorine solution does not store for very
long (~2 months).

Step 2: Use stock chlorine solution to disinfect water
• Add 2½ *tablespoons* (approx 1½ oz) of stock chlorine solution to 1
gallon of water.
• Stir into solution and wait 30 mins.

Sample taste the disinfected water, if it tastes too strong of chlorine then
aerate the water by simply pouring 1 gallon from one container into another a
couple times. This will help remove the objectionable taste, if any. Also, letting
the water stand for several hours will allow the chlorine to evaporate.

Instructions for Bleach: To make a 5% chlorine solution to be able to use
the drop method for disinfecting water, add and dissolve ½ teaspoon of 70%
calcium hypochlorite to ¾ cup of water. This will decay at the same rate of
purchased 5.25% bleach so don’t make more than you will use in a fairly
short time.

ETA: If I figured it out right, to skip the two step process, 1/64th of a tablespoon of the powder would disinfect 4 gallons of water. Can anyone back me up on this? I can't see a reason for doing the two part process, when you could just directly disinfect the water using a smaller quantity of the granular solution.

I figured it this way - 1 tablespoon makes 2 gallons of BLEACH SOLUTION (not drinking water), and 2 tbs of that liquid bleach solution makes a gallon of drinkable water. There are 256 tablespoons in a gallon. 1/2 tbs of granule makes 256 tbs (one gallon) of the bleach solution. 1/64th tbs of granule makes 8tb of bleach solution, and 8tbs of bleach solution disinfects 4 gallons.

Any idea how many grains would comprise 1/64th tbs? It can't be many.
airgunner  [Team Member]
1/23/2012 2:07:20 PM
Originally Posted By BIG_PAPA:
Originally Posted By Scout_19Delta:
Why not just use bleach? At 6%, two drops per lt goes along way.


Because bleach loses potency over time. Granular shock does not.


At what rate over how long of a period of time?
TheMountaineer  [Team Member]
1/23/2012 2:54:22 PM


Thanks for the link. I've only glanced through it, but so far it's very informative. It mentions Leslie's pool shock, particularly this one:

Link to Leslie's Power Powder Plus. In the product info, it mentions it doesn't have stabilizers, which is good. The less other stuff and the more chlorine the better.

A little over $3.50/lb if you buy the 24 pack. It's weird that 24 individual packs are $85, but a 25 pound tub is $94. I thought it'd be cheaper, but it ends up being better that way - individually sealed packages instead of one big tub that can get messed up all at once. I'll defintely have to get some.
ROMAD-556  [Member]
1/23/2012 4:04:21 PM
Heh, I've been away from SF for a long time (personal stuff) but wandered in here yesterday to see whats new. Looks like my old thread on pool shock was popular and the extra set of eyes helped correct my misunderstanding of what was getting created in the 1st step of the process. I was thinking bleach was getting made and its really just a chlorine stock.

I see in the post above that all the corrections have been made and the clarifications make things easier to understand. Wish I could go back and edit my 4 year old post but its long since been archived.

I guess I dont have much to add other than to say Thanks to the rest of SF for cleaning up and adding to the pool shock water purification process!
ROMAD-556  [Member]
1/23/2012 4:05:16 PM
double tap
Centuryhouse  [Member]
1/23/2012 4:13:15 PM
AIRGUNNER: store bought bleach loses it's potency 6 months after it was manufactured. By the time you buy it at the store, no telling how much life it's already lost in transit and sitting on the shelf.

THEMOUNTAINEER: you can go into a Leslie's store and just buy the 1lb bag for $3.50, no need to buy in bulk. A 1lb bag of it would disinfect YEARS worth of drinking water.

ROMAD556: Thanks for your original input on the issue, I'm glad to have had the info available!
Dace  [Team Member]
1/23/2012 5:23:38 PM
Originally Posted By BIG_PAPA:
Originally Posted By Scout_19Delta:
Why not just use bleach? At 6%, two drops per lt goes along way.


Because bleach loses potency over time. Granular shock does not.


To pile on, I would add that the Clorox bleach bottles are designed to decompose and will do so if sitting to long allowing bleach to leach out....getting everywhere and eating through woods shelves if it sits long enough.
airgunner  [Team Member]
1/23/2012 8:22:08 PM
Originally Posted By Centuryhouse:
AIRGUNNER: store bought bleach loses it's potency 6 months after it was manufactured. By the time you buy it at the store, no telling how much life it's already lost in transit and sitting on the shelf.

Do you have any more specific numbers?

I don't mean to be a pain but I'm curious because if you use chlorine tabs to make a Chlorine Stock proposed above and that stock is 120 times weaker then store bleach and yet still effective, sounds to me that even if store bought bleach looses 80 or 90% of it's effectiveness after some amount of time then it would still be at least as effective as the Chlorine Stock? So I'd like to see some actually figures or a graph that shows how much effectiveness it looses over a given time span. I'm trying to determine how long would it take for properly stored commercial bleach to become less effective then Chlorine Stock?

My other reasons for asking is because I know I've used bleach that was more then 1-2 years old and while it may not have been a potent as when new, it was still plenty strong. That and I was also watching one of those survival shows (Man, Woman, Wild) and Hawke use some bleach in one episode that had to have been at least 10 years to sterilize some water.and it seemed to work just fine.

Stocking chlorine tabs may be a better long term solution but you better be very careful about where you store them as I seem to recall them having a pretty nasty effect on nearby metal.


Centuryhouse  [Member]
1/23/2012 11:07:53 PM
Originally Posted By airgunner:
Originally Posted By Centuryhouse:
AIRGUNNER: store bought bleach loses it's potency 6 months after it was manufactured. By the time you buy it at the store, no telling how much life it's already lost in transit and sitting on the shelf.

Do you have any more specific numbers?

I don't mean to be a pain but I'm curious because if you use chlorine tabs to make a Chlorine Stock proposed above and that stock is 120 times weaker then store bleach and yet still effective, sounds to me that even if store bought bleach looses 80 or 90% of it's effectiveness after some amount of time then it would still be at least as effective as the Chlorine Stock? So I'd like to see some actually figures or a graph that shows how much effectiveness it looses over a given time span. I'm trying to determine how long would it take for properly stored commercial bleach to become less effective then Chlorine Stock?


If you really want to know, I'd suggest you google it. The internet I'm using is so slow it's painful, so doing a lot of searching is a pain.

I guess the bottom line is that you can risk your life on it's disinfecting abilities after the chemical reaction has deteriorated it's disinfecting properties, but I wouldn't risk it when there are better alternatives.

Not definitive necessarily but the first hits I got all confirm what I was saying:

Studies have shown that bleach loses 50% of its effectiveness over a period of 3 months.
http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/38/3881943c-d5cd-4d8a-96d8-5c9bc82cb474.pdf

Open a new bottle every month as bleach loses its effectiveness when stored; make dilution daily.
http://www.ct.gov/dph/lib/dph/environmental_health/eoha/pdf/school_nurse_disinfectant_fs.pdf
SR712  [Team Member]
1/23/2012 11:13:33 PM
HaHa. TV shows are NOT Real, Man. Do not base anything you do on what you watch on TV. The people writing this stuff are usually a bunch of snot-nosed weenies from LA. While there might be some bits based on some truth, generally it is made up in some studio's conference room over lunch.
Silas  [Team Member]
1/23/2012 11:27:15 PM
Tag
TheMountaineer  [Team Member]
1/24/2012 1:28:00 AM
Originally Posted By Centuryhouse:
AIRGUNNER: store bought bleach loses it's potency 6 months after it was manufactured. By the time you buy it at the store, no telling how much life it's already lost in transit and sitting on the shelf.

THEMOUNTAINEER: you can go into a Leslie's store and just buy the 1lb bag for $3.50, no need to buy in bulk. A 1lb bag of it would disinfect YEARS worth of drinking water.

ROMAD556: Thanks for your original input on the issue, I'm glad to have had the info available!


Thanks, but just looking at the map of their store locations, the nearest one is probably 3 hours away. It's a Leslie's dead zone around West Virginia.

I don't know if I'd need 24 pounds, but I still want to get quite a bit. Like I said in the OP, it would also be good for charity and barter.

Plus, if any of the packages got messed up, I'd have backups. Two is one, one is none.
TheMountaineer  [Team Member]
1/24/2012 1:28:15 AM
Double tap
airgunner  [Team Member]
1/24/2012 7:55:40 AM
I didn't spend much time looking before finding this...

Consulting a Chlorox bleach representative produced this statement:

“We recommend storing our bleach at room temperatures. It can be stored for about 6 months at temperatures between 50 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit. After this time, bleach will be begin to degrade at a rate of 20% each year until totally degraded to salt and water. Storing at temperatures much higher than 70 degrees Fahrenheit could cause the bleach to lose its effectiveness and degrade more rapidly.


So it looks to me, a fresh jug of bleach properly stored should last a least a few years but I guess it comes down to your needs and desires? I'm not prepping for the end of the world so I don't need preps that that can last 10-20 years or more. So for me, buying a new jug of bleach every year is no big deal but out of my own curiosity, I think I am going to find some type of test kit and see how long it takes for it to reach a point of ineffectiveness?

rxdawg  [Team Member]
1/24/2012 11:09:10 AM
Find a local pool supply store and read labels. Look for no additives (stabilizers, etc) and the higher the concentration the better. A case or two will go a long way for water purification.
Centuryhouse  [Member]
1/24/2012 1:19:10 PM
Originally Posted By TheMountaineer:
Originally Posted By Centuryhouse:
AIRGUNNER: store bought bleach loses it's potency 6 months after it was manufactured. By the time you buy it at the store, no telling how much life it's already lost in transit and sitting on the shelf.

THEMOUNTAINEER: you can go into a Leslie's store and just buy the 1lb bag for $3.50, no need to buy in bulk. A 1lb bag of it would disinfect YEARS worth of drinking water.

ROMAD556: Thanks for your original input on the issue, I'm glad to have had the info available!


Thanks, but just looking at the map of their store locations, the nearest one is probably 3 hours away. It's a Leslie's dead zone around West Virginia.
I don't know if I'd need 24 pounds, but I still want to get quite a bit. Like I said in the OP, it would also be good for charity and barter.
Plus, if any of the packages got messed up, I'd have backups. Two is one, one is none.


True, and it's not like it's a huge amount of money for the 24 lbs.
wikioutdoor  [Member]
1/24/2012 1:30:18 PM
I am not a proponent of chemical based water treatment as the effects of loading on the body long term are not well understood. http://www.lifesaversystems.com/