AR15.Com Archives
 Storing canned, freeze dried, dehydrated goods with no power after SHTF?
pops2element  [Team Member]
5/5/2011 3:21:44 AM
i have a decent stockpile of MREs canned goods and dry goods. This isn't even mentioning the guns and ammo aspect.
I am going to buy some of that pool shock from the water purification thread to help with long term drinking water.

One worry I have is the storage of my preps. Even thing I have read says canned goods and such will last so long in a good enviorment.
I live in Virginia where it gets hot as hell in the summer and freezing in the winter. How can I plan to keep my preps good during SHTF with no AC or central heating source?
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Isenhelm  [Team Member]
5/5/2011 3:46:56 AM
got a basement?

We do not really have them here in TX and it gets HOT, some people could use their storm shelter or dig a hole.


pops2element  [Team Member]
5/5/2011 4:07:52 AM
Originally Posted By Isenhelm:
got a basement?

We do not really have them here in TX and it gets HOT, some people could use their storm shelter or dig a hole.




Nope

I grew up in Illinois so I always had a basement, but I haven't been in a house here that had a basement.
I worked as a maintenance man for 6 months so I had been in a lot of houses.
henrybaddass  [Member]
5/5/2011 4:40:05 AM
The Mayor and I are going to start digging.
I've told him this week, again, he can either lead, follow or get the fukk out of my way.
I'm doing it. He wants to live but his frugal ways need to go by the wayside. He's pissing away his last opportunity. Somebody else will be spending his savings and retirement. Or it'll be used as tinder.

Underground. solar flare shielding too. Root celler if nothing else. Get down enough that canned in glass or metal won't freeze, under the worst conditions because that's what's coming. Learn to smoke. No, not cigs silly, meats for longer term storage. Glass canning is great but they are heavy.......camping Bug Out fragile and tend to freeze.....
Jerky for the win. or plan on bleeding your horse for dailly snacks. Choose.
Quarterbore  [Moderator]
5/5/2011 9:52:20 AM
If you own your property, there are lots of ways to add a root cellar next to the house. While I am not ready to say it is urgent I certainly think that having one would really help in a sever crisis.

See: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&biw=1025&bih=604&q=root+cellar+plans&aq=f&aqi=g1g-v2g-m7&aql=f&oq=

OR: http://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&hl=en&source=hp&biw=1025&bih=604&q=root+cellar+plans&gbv=2&aq=f&aqi=g1&aql=&oq=
rike  [Member]
5/5/2011 10:10:50 AM
I'm thinking that if one has 1 years worth of food he will be working through his preps in a shtf situation and shelf life will no longer be an issue.

That year will be spent busting ass to get true self sufficiency going (garden, livestock, new economy, etc... .)

Kind of makes a year of preps not seem like enough.

ETA I'm in Florida, missed the freezing part.(waiting for answer on that one)
protus  [Team Member]
5/5/2011 5:39:59 PM
heat will effect them but not as much as many think.
What kind of shelf life are you looking for 10 yrs,15,20+
Ive had stuff stored in summer heats down here for a bit. Nothing has gone bad yet ( well ,well over the 1 yr time frame your talking about).

This is the 2 part series on my channel showing some common LTS items, that were stored over 10-15 yrs in a non HVAC controlled environment.































i wont expect 30 yrs off some stuff, but 1-20 you'll be fine IMHO
Unique1  [Team Member]
5/5/2011 6:27:15 PM

Originally Posted By protus:
heat will effect them but not as much as many think.
What kind of shelf life are you looking for 10 yrs,15,20+
Ive had stuff stored in summer heats down here for a bit. Nothing has gone bad yet ( well ,well over the 1 yr time frame your talking about).

This is the 2 part series on my channel showing some common LTS items, that were stored over 10-15 yrs in a non HVAC controlled environment.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBoKCSFA1lQ&feature=channel_video_title






























i wont expect 30 yrs off some stuff, but 1-20 you'll be fine IMHO

Good video, tagging for later viewing WITH wife.
Cacinok  [Team Member]
5/5/2011 7:11:35 PM
Originally Posted By Quarterbore:
If you own your property, there are lots of ways to add a root cellar next to the house. While I am not ready to say it is urgent I certainly think that having one would really help in a sever crisis.

See: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&biw=1025&bih=604&q=root+cellar+plans&aq=f&aqi=g1g-v2g-m7&aql=f&oq=

OR: http://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&hl=en&source=hp&biw=1025&bih=604&q=root+cellar+plans&gbv=2&aq=f&aqi=g1&aql=&oq=


This. Root cellars have been keeping foods edible for a long long time. When ours fills up, I'll build another.
adamtheduke  [Team Member]
5/5/2011 7:48:46 PM
Originally Posted By protus:
heat will effect them but not as much as many think.
What kind of shelf life are you looking for 10 yrs,15,20+
Ive had stuff stored in summer heats down here for a bit. Nothing has gone bad yet ( well ,well over the 1 yr time frame your talking about).

This is the 2 part series on my channel showing some common LTS items, that were stored over 10-15 yrs in a non HVAC controlled environment.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBoKCSFA1lQ&feature=channel_video_title

i wont expect 30 yrs off some stuff, but 1-20 you'll be fine IMHO



Subscribed and bookmarked. Great video! Especially for the beginner like me.

Loadthis  [Team Member]
5/5/2011 7:52:15 PM
Originally Posted By rike:
I'm thinking that if one has 1 years worth of food he will be working through his preps in a shtf situation and shelf life will no longer be an issue.

That year will be spent busting ass to get true self sufficiency going (garden, livestock, new economy, etc... .)

Kind of makes a year of preps not seem like enough.

ETA I'm in Florida, missed the freezing part.(waiting for answer on that one)


This is what I was thinking. Don't think you would be prepping while in a SHTF scenario aside from trying to maintain that 1 year supply or maybe two year once things die down a bit. You would be utilizing your preps because SHTF is the situation you prepped for.
Cacinok  [Team Member]
5/5/2011 9:11:33 PM
Originally Posted By Loadthis:
Originally Posted By rike:
I'm thinking that if one has 1 years worth of food he will be working through his preps in a shtf situation and shelf life will no longer be an issue.

That year will be spent busting ass to get true self sufficiency going (garden, livestock, new economy, etc... .)

Kind of makes a year of preps not seem like enough.

ETA I'm in Florida, missed the freezing part.(waiting for answer on that one)


This is what I was thinking. Don't think you would be prepping while in a SHTF scenario aside from trying to maintain that 1 year supply or maybe two year once things die down a bit. You would be utilizing your preps because SHTF is the situation you prepped for.


Trying to maintain the 1 year food supply (i.e., growing food and canning it) is by definition prepping.

I think what OP was getting at is how to store food w/o refrigeration after a SHTF situation.
showpare  [Team Member]
5/5/2011 9:29:36 PM
snipOriginally Posted By protus:

This is the 2 part series on my channel showing some common LTS items, that were stored over 10-15 yrs in a non HVAC controlled environment.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBoKCSFA1lQ&feature=channel_video_title


I watched these vids several years ago and was really inspired. Sadly, I'm just now at the point of putting away LTS food. We got got 1 gal mylar bags in the mail on Monday of this week. I've been buying wheat from Walmart, 25lbs at a time. I F'ing searched for feed wheat like protus had in these vids and could not find it around here.

Thanks for posting.
Cacinok  [Team Member]
5/5/2011 9:33:37 PM
Originally Posted By showpare:
snipOriginally Posted By protus:

This is the 2 part series on my channel showing some common LTS items, that were stored over 10-15 yrs in a non HVAC controlled environment.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBoKCSFA1lQ&feature=channel_video_title


I watched these vids several years ago and was really inspired. Sadly, I'm just now at the point of putting away LTS food. We got got 1 gal mylar bags in the mail on Monday of this week. I've been buying wheat from Walmart, 25lbs at a time. I F'ing searched for feed wheat like protus had in these vids and could not find it around here.

Thanks for posting.


did you call the graineries around you? our local grainery (only one around) had hard red and ordered in some hard white for us. we did order a combined total of 13k lbs, so they were pretty helpful.
protus  [Team Member]
5/6/2011 5:53:06 AM

Originally Posted By showpare:
snipOriginally Posted By protus:

This is the 2 part series on my channel showing some common LTS items, that were stored over 10-15 yrs in a non HVAC controlled environment.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBoKCSFA1lQ&feature=channel_video_title


I watched these vids several years ago and was really inspired. Sadly, I'm just now at the point of putting away LTS food. We got got 1 gal mylar bags in the mail on Monday of this week. I've been buying wheat from Walmart, 25lbs at a time. I F'ing searched for feed wheat like protus had in these vids and could not find it around here.

Thanks for posting.


what we got was white wheat.
It took a few trips over the year to figure out when the best time to buy was and when we did buy it was in bulk.
I did the same with corn down here. If i went in asking 100 questions to the feed store about it,, they gave me the look and then
you cant eat this speech. So it was 8$..test....pack it or stick in the deer feeder

protus  [Team Member]
5/6/2011 5:55:29 AM
when the event happens is a true long term event, the LTS you have now is a buffer, a cushion while you expand your abilties to produce y our own food. Just like folks used to cure meat and can foods to last over winter...well...shtf will be a long winter,,,so you want that buffer to prop you up till your gardens get growing and your live stock producing .
36_gauge  [Member]
5/6/2011 6:39:42 AM

Originally Posted By protus:
when the event happens is a true long term event, the LTS you have now is a buffer, a cushion while you expand your abilties to produce y our own food. Just like folks used to cure meat and can foods to last over winter...well...shtf will be a long winter,,,so you want that buffer to prop you up till your gardens get growing and your live stock producing .

that means reverting back to a subsistence farming society. with 7 billion people in the world, without literally culling much of the population, that approach is completely unfeasible in most of the world. in Europe, China, Middle East... there just isn't enough arable land. a long term event either will mean forming a new society, a stronger society or massive death for us over here.
TomJefferson  [Site Staff]
5/6/2011 9:19:09 AM
The way things are going, very soon now a great many preppars are going to learn stored food is for more than just the SHTF and Zombie invasion.

As for the storage question, you got your answer in the first post in this thread.

A good way to look at this is what people did in your area before electricity. Well that was ice and before ice the "root cellar". For many of us, our "root cellar" is out basement.

Tj
Cacinok  [Team Member]
5/6/2011 9:25:24 AM
Originally Posted By 36_gauge:

Originally Posted By protus:
when the event happens is a true long term event, the LTS you have now is a buffer, a cushion while you expand your abilties to produce y our own food. Just like folks used to cure meat and can foods to last over winter...well...shtf will be a long winter,,,so you want that buffer to prop you up till your gardens get growing and your live stock producing .

that means reverting back to a subsistence farming society. with 7 billion people in the world, without literally culling much of the population, that approach is completely unfeasible in most of the world. in Europe, China, Middle East... there just isn't enough arable land. a long term event either will mean forming a new society, a stronger society or massive death for us over here.


Probably both. If the big one happens, the scenario is neither pretty in the short term, nor in the long term. Even those w/ a years supply of food may not make it.
Cacinok  [Team Member]
5/6/2011 9:26:44 AM
Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
The way things are going, very soon now a great many preppars are going to learn stored food is for more than just the SHTF and Zombie invasion.


As for the storage question, you got your answer in the first post in this thread.

A good way to look at this is what people did in your area before electricity. Well that was ice and before ice the "root cellar". For many of us, our "root cellar" is out basement.

Tj


I think I know where you're going, but please expound.
PzIvF2s  [Team Member]
5/6/2011 9:30:24 AM
I got a book on traditional food storage. Since you don't have a basement, you might consider making a root cellar. You can build one in your backyard. Not sure how high the water table is (i.e. don't store your food in a well ), but you'll get a more constant temp. You'll have to watch out for the humidity with steel cans down there, but you can stick a hygrometer down there and see what reads.

EDIT: wow...just a little too late. maybe just read mine as a +1
SR712  [Team Member]
5/6/2011 9:35:32 AM
Informative video, although it goes r-e-a-l- s-l-o-w. I wish you hadn't wore shorts.
TomJefferson  [Site Staff]
5/6/2011 10:00:07 AM
Originally Posted By Cacinok:
Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
The way things are going, very soon now a great many preppars are going to learn stored food is for more than just the SHTF and Zombie invasion.


As for the storage question, you got your answer in the first post in this thread.

A good way to look at this is what people did in your area before electricity. Well that was ice and before ice the "root cellar". For many of us, our "root cellar" is out basement.

Tj


I think I know where you're going, but please expound.


As inflation and prices rise, our expendable income dries and once that's eaten up, the only real variable we have is food.

If you think about that, our mortgage, utilities, and even the gas in our cars needed to get to work are must haves. Food, now there's where we can cut back, a bowl of rice is a lot more affordable than steak. If we did it right, our larders are a great buffer on inflation.

It can augment what we are buying. This is especially true of those of us who get paid monthly. We can budget as well as we can but inflation can tear our budgets up very fast and once a budget is blown, it takes time to react. For example, the savings from cutting back or off the cable is 1 month out. Name your cutback?

Now, of course, if all you put back was rice and beans and you grocery store financial budget is rice and beans, well, you're going to eat rice and beans. It is why these are not high storage items in my larder. Having been there in my youth, I can tell you when times are hard, you will get your share of rice and beans, beans and cornbread. Starch is poor people food, always has been.

Poor is just a matter of timing.

Tj
Ziggy2c  [Team Member]
5/6/2011 10:12:02 AM
TSP did a good podcast (EP 636) that made a lot of sense for food storage. One of his points was to mix your food stores into your everyday life. That way you'll #1 keep your food rotating even if it takes a year or two to do it, and #2 know if you like the food your storing so that if you don't you can replace it before your stuck with it. Just a little something to think about.
Cacinok  [Team Member]
5/6/2011 10:26:28 AM
Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
Originally Posted By Cacinok:
Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
The way things are going, very soon now a great many preppars are going to learn stored food is for more than just the SHTF and Zombie invasion.


As for the storage question, you got your answer in the first post in this thread.

A good way to look at this is what people did in your area before electricity. Well that was ice and before ice the "root cellar". For many of us, our "root cellar" is out basement.

Tj


I think I know where you're going, but please expound.


As inflation and prices rise, our expendable income dries and once that's eaten up, the only real variable we have is food.

If you think about that, our mortgage, utilities, and even the gas in our cars needed to get to work are must haves. Food, now there's where we can cut back, a bowl of rice is a lot more affordable than steak. If we did it right, our larders are a great buffer on inflation.

It can augment what we are buying. This is especially true of those of us who get paid monthly. We can budget as well as we can but inflation can tear our budgets up very fast and once a budget is blown, it takes time to react. For example, the savings from cutting back or off the cable is 1 month out. Name your cutback?

Now, of course, if all you put back was rice and beans and you grocery store financial budget is rice and beans, well, you're going to eat rice and beans. It is why these are not high storage items in my larder. Having been there in my youth, I can tell you when times are hard, you will get your share of rice and beans, beans and cornbread. Starch is poor people food, always has been.

Poor is just a matter of timing.

Tj


Thought that was were you were headed, but didn't want to jump to conclusions. Interesting point about the starches - my wife and I planted a lot of extra sweet potatoes and planted regular potatoes, for the first time, as well as Jerusalem artichokes (I think that's a starch lol). In anticipation of what you mentioned, my wife is also spending a lot of time perfecting her cheese making skills to reduce the grocery budget. She said that we need to look at a cheese press so that she can make hard cheeses - I told her to use Fordguy's method and use a case of ammo as the press.
protus  [Team Member]
5/6/2011 12:22:01 PM

Originally Posted By Ziggy2c:
TSP did a good podcast (EP 636) that made a lot of sense for food storage. One of his points was to mix your food stores into your everyday life. That way you'll #1 keep your food rotating even if it takes a year or two to do it, and #2 know if you like the food your storing so that if you don't you can replace it before your stuck with it. Just a little something to think about.

many have said to do just that for years . Many however refuse to try it.....
I know i took my "prep" food a few years back and lived off of it for 5 days. After that, i changed a whole lot. However,many dont.
LTS foods or even STS foods are no different than gear, you gotta use it to know how it will perform....
TomJefferson  [Site Staff]
5/6/2011 1:38:37 PM
Originally Posted By Cacinok:
Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
Originally Posted By Cacinok:
Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
The way things are going, very soon now a great many preppars are going to learn stored food is for more than just the SHTF and Zombie invasion.


As for the storage question, you got your answer in the first post in this thread.

A good way to look at this is what people did in your area before electricity. Well that was ice and before ice the "root cellar". For many of us, our "root cellar" is out basement.

Tj


I think I know where you're going, but please expound.


As inflation and prices rise, our expendable income dries and once that's eaten up, the only real variable we have is food.

If you think about that, our mortgage, utilities, and even the gas in our cars needed to get to work are must haves. Food, now there's where we can cut back, a bowl of rice is a lot more affordable than steak. If we did it right, our larders are a great buffer on inflation.

It can augment what we are buying. This is especially true of those of us who get paid monthly. We can budget as well as we can but inflation can tear our budgets up very fast and once a budget is blown, it takes time to react. For example, the savings from cutting back or off the cable is 1 month out. Name your cutback?

Now, of course, if all you put back was rice and beans and you grocery store financial budget is rice and beans, well, you're going to eat rice and beans. It is why these are not high storage items in my larder. Having been there in my youth, I can tell you when times are hard, you will get your share of rice and beans, beans and cornbread. Starch is poor people food, always has been.

Poor is just a matter of timing.

Tj


Thought that was were you were headed, but didn't want to jump to conclusions. Interesting point about the starches - my wife and I planted a lot of extra sweet potatoes and planted regular potatoes, for the first time, as well as Jerusalem artichokes (I think that's a starch lol). In anticipation of what you mentioned, my wife is also spending a lot of time perfecting her cheese making skills to reduce the grocery budget. She said that we need to look at a cheese press so that she can make hard cheeses - I told her to use Fordguy's method and use a case of ammo as the press.


You know its almost amazing sometimes where you can pick up survival tips.

I was reading Pappy Boyington's book, "Baa Baa Black Sheep" where he expanded some on his Japanese POW experience. He explained their diet was almost exclusively Miso. An officer camp, those who grew up poor use to starch as their main source in their diet did obviously much better than their more affluent fellow prisoners which were use to a high protein diet.

Starch is inexpensive so its food for the poor. God, how I love wheat products but other than a few cans of flour, I don't stock a lot of wheat. I've pretty much made up my mind, if times are so hard we can't afford bread, that's time to bug out. Go back to the farm where you can grow a lot more food than I can here.

Another great source of information is Depression Babies. One side of my family was city and the other country. Though normally the standard of living was much higher in the city, during the Great Depression it was the opposite. Still you learn from both. I probably know a million ways to make a meal out of baloney and to this day, I'm perfectly happy with baloney gravy and biscuits for a meal.

A big problem in our society today is we are a pre-packaged society. We just take it out of the box or the can and heat it up. That thinking is very limiting on making food stretch and sinks us into one very repetitive diet.

Tj
cockroach  [Member]
5/6/2011 2:54:13 PM
LOOK HERE for some good ideas......
BushBoar  [Team Member]
5/6/2011 4:39:12 PM

Originally Posted By pops2element:
i have a decent stockpile of MREs canned goods and dry goods. This isn't even mentioning the guns and ammo aspect.
I am going to buy some of that pool shock from the water purification thread to help with long term drinking water.

One worry I have is the storage of my preps. Even thing I have read says canned goods and such will last so long in a good enviorment.
I live in Virginia where it gets hot as hell in the summer and freezing in the winter. How can I plan to keep my preps good during SHTF with no AC or central heating source?

I've heard of guys sealing things in an appropriate container and sinking them in a lake 30 or so feet down, with a line attached to a buoy or something similar. It would keep things reasonably cool.

Of course, this presupposes access to a suitable body of water, and the security of said body of water...
showpare  [Team Member]
5/6/2011 10:33:06 PM
Originally Posted By Cacinok:
Originally Posted By showpare:
snipOriginally Posted By protus:
This is the 2 part series on my channel showing some common

buying wheat from Walmart, 25lbs at a time. searched for feed wheat like protus hcould not find it around here.


did you call the graineries around you? our local grainery (only one around) had hard red and ordered in some hard white for us. we did order a combined total of 13k lbs, so they were pretty helpful.


I went to every (not every) feed store in this area and in the Iowa City area. I got a lot of this when I asked for 'feed wheat.' "What do you want that for" I was beat down.

I am happy with getting Walmart wheat.

I'll got 50lbs of popcorn from the home and farm yesterday for $20.

Ziggy2c  [Team Member]
5/7/2011 2:15:17 PM
Originally Posted By showpare:
Originally Posted By Cacinok:
Originally Posted By showpare:
snipOriginally Posted By protus:
This is the 2 part series on my channel showing some common

buying wheat from Walmart, 25lbs at a time. searched for feed wheat like protus hcould not find it around here.


did you call the graineries around you? our local grainery (only one around) had hard red and ordered in some hard white for us. we did order a combined total of 13k lbs, so they were pretty helpful.


I went to every (not every) feed store in this area and in the Iowa City area. I got a lot of this when I asked for 'feed wheat.' "What do you want that for" I was beat down.

I am happy with getting Walmart wheat.

I'll got 50lbs of popcorn from the home and farm yesterday for $20.



"Because I got some money to spend and I can buy it from you or I can go some place else, that what I need it for." Or my normal answer "Because I want some."
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