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 How can I tell how much weight my trailer is rated for?? UPDATE!!!
AmericanPatriot1776  [Member]
8/17/2010 10:40:31 PM
I have a Thule CargoPro trailer that I got used.

Where can I find the weight rating on it? Should it be listed somewhere on the trailer?

I am packing a lot of camping/survival gear in it and what to make sure.

I plan on weighing all of my equipment to get a feel for how much I have.

Any thoughts??

I found GVWR/PNBV 2200 lbs on it - What exactly does it mean??
Echo2  [Team Member]
8/17/2010 10:45:17 PM
title
buckmaw  [Team Member]
8/17/2010 10:50:17 PM

Originally Posted By Echo2:
title

Some small trailers dont have a title, but it should be on the registration.
DarthMuffin  [Member]
8/17/2010 10:53:33 PM
The procedure is somewhat like the first comic here

Calvin's dad explains bridge loads
mylt1  [Member]
8/17/2010 11:12:12 PM
there should be a tag on it somewhere that gives all the weight information. if all else fails, contact the maker.
HubMcCaan  [Team Member]
8/17/2010 11:33:40 PM
Most of the 15 or so trailers I own don't have any stickers, tags, titles, or even a manufacturer name on them - if you go find someone that has a lot of experience they can usually give you a pretty good idea based on the axle size, number of bolts on the hubs, and sometimes tire size. You might check out http://www.thuletrailers.com/ and see if there is anything like it.
EXPY37  [Member]
8/18/2010 12:25:18 AM
You probably have a torsion axle and the axle specification, mfgr, and part number should be on it.
diverman  [Team Member]
8/18/2010 12:47:08 AM
The axle determines tthe weight. What is the model number?
biere  [Team Member]
8/18/2010 2:48:35 AM
Check tires for their weight rating.

Check axle for its weight rating.

Since you bought used you have to consider the idea that someone may have swapped a wimpy low rating axle out for one with a heavier rating to get larger bearings and tires under the trailer, but that does not mean the frame can handle the weight.

The coupler should be stamped with some numbers as well. A 2 inch ball has a lot of leeway in weight ratings. The smaller ball size, I forget what it is since I don't own any of it, has a low weight rating and 2 5/16th inch ball stuff can go silly high in weight ratings.

I also agree with looking at similar or identical trailers to get an idea of what yours is rated at.

Trailer my uncle and I bought recently has a title and tag and all sorts of stuff. I have owned home made stuff that was just a "you load it and you take responsability for it" sort of thing.

AmericanPatriot1776  [Member]
8/18/2010 7:53:15 AM
The Trailer is a 2006 Cargo Pro and it is 5'x10'.

I will check the title and original registration.

The company that I work for bought the trailer, so everything is original.

They gave it to me for free.
pyro6988  [Team Member]
8/18/2010 10:10:17 AM
Originally Posted By AmericanPatriot1776:
The Trailer is a 2006 Cargo Pro and it is 5'x10'.

I will check the title and original registration.

The company that I work for bought the trailer, so everything is original.

They gave it to me for free
.



It's official I hate you.


genesis  [Team Member]
8/18/2010 10:16:07 AM
Originally Posted By pyro6988:
Originally Posted By AmericanPatriot1776:
The Trailer is a 2006 Cargo Pro and it is 5'x10'.

I will check the title and original registration.

The company that I work for bought the trailer, so everything is original.

They gave it to me for free
.



It's official I hate you.




Topper1  [Member]
8/18/2010 12:05:48 PM
Sometimes the axle will have a metal band wrapped around it with the max load stamped on it.
lumper  [Team Member]
8/18/2010 12:25:52 PM
I am going to guess based on the model it is a single axel, and rated at 2000 pounds loaded weight.

You can not always go by the title weight, some heavy trailers may be listed below the actual rated weight to 10,000 Lbs to get around the CDL weight limits. For example, I have a deck over trailer with the manufacturer's rated weight being 12,000 Lbs. I have it titled as 10,000 because than anyone without a CDL can use it, and the registration is far less money. It will still carry the 12,000 Lbs, just not lawfully.
HubMcCaan  [Team Member]
8/18/2010 11:32:20 PM
Originally Posted By lumper:
I am going to guess based on the model it is a single axel, and rated at 2000 pounds loaded weight.

You can not always go by the title weight, some heavy trailers may be listed below the actual rated weight to 10,000 Lbs to get around the CDL weight limits. For example, I have a deck over trailer with the manufacturer's rated weight being 12,000 Lbs. I have it titled as 10,000 because than anyone without a CDL can use it, and the registration is far less money. It will still carry the 12,000 Lbs, just not lawfully.


I thought that it had to be CDL only if your GCW was 26,000 and over. I've got a dump trailer that I pull behind my truck and my CGVW is just under 26,000.
hobbsar  [Team Member]
8/18/2010 11:55:47 PM
I work at a place that sells trailer parts for both utility and semi trailers so I'll share what I know off the top of my head.

The most accurate way to determine axle weight rating is to check bearing numbers.
L44643 inner and outer bearing is either a 1500 or 2000 lb axle depending on whether it is 4 or 5 lug. 1.75" axle tube
L68149 inner and l44649 outer is a 3500 lb axle. These can have 5 or 6 lugs and the 6 lug can be rated at 4000 lb depending on tubing wall thickness. 2.375" tube
25580 inner and 15123 outer is a 5200 or 6000 lb axle depending on tube thickness. These are 6 lug. 3" tube
25580 inner and 14125a outer is 7000lb. 8 lug nuts. 3" tube

Now we get to springs.
Most will be 1.75" wide for double eye springs.
3 leaf can be 750-1000 lbs each.
4 leaf is 1750 lb each
6 leaf is 2600 lb each ( I think).

Now you need to get the trailer weighed empty.
Then you figure the axle and suspension weight rating minus the trailer weight and this will be how much cargo you can haul.
So if you have a 3500 lb axle with 4 leaf springs, and the trailer weighs 1000 lbs empty, you can carry 2500 lbs safely.
Bear in mind that the weight rating will depend on the weakest component.
Just because you have springs capable of supporting 5200 lbs doesn't mean a whole lot if you have a 3500 lb axle and vice versa.

I believe a 2" trailer coupler is rated at 7500 lbs, but I would have to check at work tomorrow to be sure.

Hope this helps.
Merlin  [Team Member]
8/19/2010 7:54:43 AM
Originally Posted By hobbsar:
I work at a place that sells trailer parts for both utility and semi trailers so I'll share what I know off the top of my head.

The most accurate way to determine axle weight rating is to check bearing numbers.
L44643 inner and outer bearing is either a 1500 or 2000 lb axle depending on whether it is 4 or 5 lug. 1.75" axle tube
L68149 inner and l44649 outer is a 3500 lb axle. These can have 5 or 6 lugs and the 6 lug can be rated at 4000 lb depending on tubing wall thickness. 2.375" tube
25580 inner and 15123 outer is a 5200 or 6000 lb axle depending on tube thickness. These are 6 lug. 3" tube
25580 inner and 14125a outer is 7000lb. 8 lug nuts. 3" tube

Now we get to springs.
Most will be 1.75" wide for double eye springs.
3 leaf can be 750-1000 lbs each.
4 leaf is 1750 lb each
6 leaf is 2600 lb each ( I think).

Now you need to get the trailer weighed empty.
Then you figure the axle and suspension weight rating minus the trailer weight and this will be how much cargo you can haul.
So if you have a 3500 lb axle with 4 leaf springs, and the trailer weighs 1000 lbs empty, you can carry 2500 lbs safely.
Bear in mind that the weight rating will depend on the weakest component.
Just because you have springs capable of supporting 5200 lbs doesn't mean a whole lot if you have a 3500 lb axle and vice versa.

I believe a 2" trailer coupler is rated at 7500 lbs, but I would have to check at work tomorrow to be sure.

Hope this helps.


Just count the lug nuts, no need to pull the bearings and look at their numbers.
hobbsar  [Team Member]
8/19/2010 10:14:36 PM
Originally Posted By Merlin:
Originally Posted By hobbsar:
I work at a place that sells trailer parts for both utility and semi trailers so I'll share what I know off the top of my head.

The most accurate way to determine axle weight rating is to check bearing numbers.
L44643 inner and outer bearing is either a 1500 or 2000 lb axle depending on whether it is 4 or 5 lug. 1.75" axle tube
L68149 inner and l44649 outer is a 3500 lb axle. These can have 5 or 6 lugs and the 6 lug can be rated at 4000 lb depending on tubing wall thickness. 2.375" tube
25580 inner and 15123 outer is a 5200 or 6000 lb axle depending on tube thickness. These are 6 lug. 3" tube
25580 inner and 14125a outer is 7000lb. 8 lug nuts. 3" tube

Now we get to springs.
Most will be 1.75" wide for double eye springs.
3 leaf can be 750-1000 lbs each.
4 leaf is 1750 lb each
6 leaf is 2600 lb each ( I think).

Now you need to get the trailer weighed empty.
Then you figure the axle and suspension weight rating minus the trailer weight and this will be how much cargo you can haul.
So if you have a 3500 lb axle with 4 leaf springs, and the trailer weighs 1000 lbs empty, you can carry 2500 lbs safely.
Bear in mind that the weight rating will depend on the weakest component.
Just because you have springs capable of supporting 5200 lbs doesn't mean a whole lot if you have a 3500 lb axle and vice versa.

I believe a 2" trailer coupler is rated at 7500 lbs, but I would have to check at work tomorrow to be sure.

Hope this helps.


Just count the lug nuts, no need to pull the bearings and look at their numbers.


Just counting lugs can be misleading since a five lug is used on both 2000 and 35000 lb axles, and 6 lug is used on 3500, 5200, and some 6000 lb axles.
Measuring tube diameter will usually tell you with counting the lugs.
Most likely OP has 3500 lb axles.
AmericanPatriot1776  [Member]
8/21/2010 7:30:27 PM
I found GVWR/PNBV 2200 lbs on it. What exactly does that mean???
skunkwerx  [Member]
8/21/2010 9:08:03 PM
Originally Posted By AmericanPatriot1776:
I found GVWR/PNBV 2200 lbs on it. What exactly does that mean???


Gross Vehicle Weight Rating = 2200 lbs.

This means that your total load, trailer plus cargo cannot exceed 2200 lbs.

Just off the cuff, (I've owned numerous trailers and built a few too.)
You probably have (approximately) a 1200 lb. max cargo capacity.

nice score.

AmericanPatriot1776  [Member]
8/21/2010 9:11:48 PM
Originally Posted By skunkwerx:
Originally Posted By AmericanPatriot1776:
I found GVWR/PNBV 2200 lbs on it. What exactly does that mean???


Gross Vehicle Weight Rating = 2200 lbs.

This means that your total load, trailer plus cargo cannot exceed 2200 lbs.

Just off the cuff, (I've owned numerous trailers and built a few too.)
You probably have (approximately) a 1200 lb. max cargo capacity.

nice score.



I guess it is time to weigh everything in the trailer or take it to a weigh station.

Bubbles  [Team Member]
8/21/2010 9:12:45 PM
Originally Posted By AmericanPatriot1776:
I found GVWR/PNBV 2200 lbs on it. What exactly does that mean???

GVWR is the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating

GVWR - empty trailer weight = maximum load

ETA: dang I'm slow tonight.