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 Generator size for a One (1) horespower deep well pump.
psgt  [Member]
7/17/2010 7:34:36 PM
Any one know how large a generator I would need to run a well pump? My preps are doing good this is the only real hole in it. Got solar to run chargers and small things but it's not going to work for a deep well pump.

Thanks for the replys. The votage is 240 and about 300 ft deep well unknown gpm I'm trying to buy the right size generator realy to run the well in a SHTF type situation not just a random power outage. The less fuel I use the better. It's a vacation/BOL house. no city water at this location.

A lot of good info is coming out. I know of an electrican training center near where I work where they have quite a few master electricians I'll check with them later in the week and maybe I can get a skilled trade answer
Fullpower  [Team Member]
7/17/2010 7:56:15 PM
Only one way to know for sure in your particular application, and that is to TRY out the generator you have in mind..
Can we assume that your ONE horsepower pump is running 240 VOLT AC?
What is the smallest generator you have available that runs 240 volts AC?
The static water level and pressure switch cut-in have as much to do with start-up amp draw as the rated well pump horsepower.
Ops  [Team Member]
7/17/2010 8:07:10 PM
I'd think you'd need about 4400 watts. My 3/4 HP runs at about 2400, starting load about 3500, depending.

Ops
jchewie1  [Member]
7/17/2010 8:42:57 PM
I have one of the Champion 3500 watt running / 4000 watt surge generators and a 3/4 HP pump that is about 70 feet deep.
This generator just barely starts my pump.
The little 6 or 6.5 hp engine just doesn't have the guts to keep going at the top end of its load for another second or two.
The pump not start if I am running anything else other than two or three lightbulbs.

I think you will probably wind up needing an 8hp or better engine with 5000 running watts minimum
aks74man  [Team Member]
7/17/2010 10:01:08 PM
1Hp is = 750watts. startup on motors will bog down gen sets but you are in a vary low demand so i would think that almost any gen set would do.
ar-jedi  [Team Member]
7/17/2010 11:13:34 PM
Originally Posted By psgt:
Any one know how large a generator I would need to run a well pump? My preps are doing good this is the only real hole in it. Got solar to run chargers and small things but it's not going to work for a deep well pump.

what voltage is the pump? how deep is the well? what is the GPM rating of the pump?

ar-jedi


Robby9  [Team Member]
7/17/2010 11:14:32 PM
From my Generac owner's manual:

*Submersible Pump (1-1/2 HP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2800
*Submersible Pump (1 HP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000
*Submersible Pump (1/2 HP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1500
* Allow 3 times the listed watts for starting these devices.


ar-jedi  [Team Member]
7/17/2010 11:14:52 PM
Originally Posted By aks74man:
1Hp is = 750watts. startup on motors will bog down gen sets but you are in a vary low demand so i would think that almost any gen set would do.

you would be wrong, way wrong here.

ar-jedi


HomeSlice  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 12:11:08 AM
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By aks74man:
1Hp is = 750watts. startup on motors will bog down gen sets but you are in a vary low demand so i would think that almost any gen set would do.

you would be wrong, way wrong here.

ar-jedi




I think so too. Offering up my own anecdote: 120V pump, unknown HP, at the bottom of a 40ft well. 2 showers and a dishwasher of GPM When running normally on line power it'll kick on/off at least once/minute during a shower. That's a lot of stop/start.

My 5K/6.25K genny wont start it –– kind of hangs for a minute then gives me a ginormous fireball when I unplug it. it's on a 20A breaker when wired thru the box (not to the generator), so in theory its only 2400W (120*20). I suspect it has to do with the way the genny is wired and not supplying all of its junk to the one port we tried to use. One of the reasons we're looking at a (much) bigger whole-house generator option.

Skibane  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 12:15:17 AM
Originally Posted By Robby9:
From my Generac owner's manual:
*Submersible Pump (1 HP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000
* Allow 3 times the listed watts for starting these devices.


...which means that you'd need a generator with around 6KW of surge power. Most 5KW generators are rated for around 6KW surge.

So, looks like around 5KW (continuous) would be the minimum safe size.

Note that gasoline-fueled generators lose about 3 percent of their maximum power for every 1,000 feet in elevation. They also lose some power when operated in hot climates, or with marginal fuel. Best strategy is to choose conservatively.
blvdbuzzard  [Member]
7/18/2010 12:48:25 AM
I too am working on getting a genset for my well. It is a 1HP but I am down 440feet also I am at 4,000 feet above sea level in the high desert of Southern Kalifornia.

I came up with this being the smallest propane gen I could get by with. I would pretty much be using it to pump up the holding tank to full pressure then turning off the well and running the fridge and freezer with a few lights and maybe charge some batteries.

Being that I have a 225 gallon propane tank outside running the house, propane makes sense for me. I do not have to store any more fuel.

GEN 1

Yet I am looking at a 10k one too. It is not much more then the propane one and should be able to handle most of what I need.

GEN 2

It is hard to find one that will do just enough to cover, yet run well. But you can spend a lot on one that will do everything but would use more fuel and cost more.


Buzz.
ar-jedi  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 1:01:30 AM
Originally Posted By psgt:
The votage is 240 and about 300 ft deep well unknown gpm

you should figure on at least a 10KW generator to ensure you can start the pump with that 300' head.

ar-jedi
berdan  [Member]
7/18/2010 3:05:35 AM
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By psgt:
The votage is 240 and about 300 ft deep well unknown gpm

you should figure on at least a 10KW generator to ensure you can start the pump with that 300' head.

ar-jedi


Above would be in excess of 42 AMPS; Most well pumps are fused/ breakered at no more than 20 or 25AMP (mine is 20). 10KW can't be right!
Glockhappy  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 3:52:25 AM
A 1HP 240 volt pump pulls 10 amps while running. On start it will pull 35ish amps, but only for .5-1 second. 240 x 10= 2400 Watts but you will need a surge capacity of around 8000 watts as the start amps are much higher. The answer to this question is when buying for a well pump you need to buy a generator based more on matching the surge rating needed for starting the the pump rather than the power needed to run the pump. Be warned that not having the needed surge capacity on hand can damage the pump motor. The windings in the motor get very hot when started this way and can destroy themselves after only a handful of starts. I run a 2HP with only 5500 watts but the generator is surge rated to 8500 watts. The surge rating is barely adequate but I have monitored the starting amps and found no problems. Many generator manufacturers overstate their run and surge watts, so be careful there too.
Jason280  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 5:57:13 AM
Above would be in excess of 42 AMPS; Most well pumps are fused/ breakered at no more than 20 or 25AMP (mine is 20). 10KW can't be right!


Just because the generator is capable of 40 amps, doesn't mean the device running off of it will see (or even pull) 40 amps.
flattire  [Member]
7/18/2010 7:05:32 AM
Originally Posted By psgt:
Any one know how large a generator I would need to run a well pump? My preps are doing good this is the only real hole in it. Got solar to run chargers and small things but it's not going to work for a deep well pump.

Thanks for the replys. The votage is 240 and about 300 ft deep well unknown gpm I'm trying to buy the right size generator realy to run the well in a SHTF type situation not just a random power outage. The less fuel I use the better. It's a vacation/BOL house. no city water at this location.


I have an engineering guide from Generac industrial division, I have a scanner but I do not know how to attach it to this reply.
So here it is.
Well & Septic pump
2 HP
amps running 240 volt 1 phase 9.8
starting KW up to 6
locked rotor amps 50
gen size varies with fuel type, nat gas,diesel, propane, multi
..........................................................................................................go to Mygenerac.com

wshbrngr  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 8:28:14 AM
I have pretty much the EXACT same well setup as you.

I have a Generac Wheelhouse 5550 ––––> 5500 watts running - 8550 watts surge and it runs the pump with no problems.

The main problem is noise. It is very loud.
It also goes through 5gals of gas in about 10-12hrs (powering a cabin with a large window a/c unit in the Texas summer heat running 24hrs/day)

ColtRifle  [Member]
7/18/2010 9:41:58 AM
A 1 hp sump pump SHOULD draw about 750 watts running and about 15-1800 starting. HOWEVER, the problem with sump pumps is they sit in water and even a quality one will start to corrode over time. As a result, it will take a LOT more power to start a sump pump and keep it running for the same size HP as a normal electric motor that is running for a different job.

Typically a well pump is made FAR better than most sump pumps (and costs many times more). They tend to last FAR longer than most sump pumps.

A good thing to do at the end of winter in many areas is to pour a couple gallons of hot water into the sump pump holding area to turn the pump on. That makes sure that the pump is still working freely for when you need it (the spring in most areas).

And, I just noticed that the OP is talking about well pumps vs sump pumps so this advise is not directly applicable to the OP's situation.
ar-jedi  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 9:44:00 AM
Originally Posted By berdan:
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By psgt:
The votage is 240 and about 300 ft deep well unknown gpm

you should figure on at least a 10KW generator to ensure you can start the pump with that 300' head.
ar-jedi

Above would be in excess of 42 AMPS; Most well pumps are fused/ breakered at no more than 20 or 25AMP (mine is 20). 10KW can't be right!

it is correct.

for a deep well submersible pump, expect that the startup current is 3 to 4 times the running current. if the source is unable to supply enough startup current, you can damage the motor. the 20 or 25A breaker than you have can carry 50A for a second or so, which is why the breaker does not trip at startup. there are time vs. ampacity curves for your specific breaker type; you can look these up. for example, the breaker may be rated to hold 20A forever, 30A for 30 seconds, 40A for 5 seconds, 50A for 1 second, and 100A for 0.1sec.

back to the generator sizing –– i don't know about you, but i err on the side of caution when there is the possibility of damaging a pump motor hanging on a piece of pipe 300 feet down, and a pump type which i don't have a spare for sitting on a shelf in the basement. that said, i don't think 10KW is an unreasonable capacity for a 240Vac well pump down 300 feet, assuming it is a typical GPM capacity.

ar-jedi
ColtRifle  [Member]
7/18/2010 9:46:38 AM
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By psgt:
The votage is 240 and about 300 ft deep well unknown gpm

you should figure on at least a 10KW generator to ensure you can start the pump with that 300' head.

ar-jedi




Bullshit. In a past house we used to have a 300 ft well with a 220 volt pump (think it was 1 hp but can't remember for sure). We ran that well pump on a 4500 watt surge/3500 watt running generator and had power to spare.

Sure 10kw will run it but you will be able to run it on a MUCH smaller generator.

Also, depending on the age of the unit, as the unit ages it will pull greater amperage as the pump begins to tighten up due to corrosion.
ar-jedi  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 9:54:13 AM
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
A 1 hp sump pump SHOULD draw about 750 watts running

a 1HP motor, of any type, requires about 1000W input. there are electrical, mechanical, and thermal losses here; getting a true 1HP at the shaft (=746W) requires about 1KW of electrical power input.

Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
and about 15-1800 starting.

from widely used motor starting power guidelines...
induction motor: 2.5 times the running current. so for 1HP = 1000W running = 2500W starting.
capacitor start motor: 3 times the running current. so for 1HP = 1000W running = 3000W starting.

Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
HOWEVER, the problem with sump pumps is they sit in water and even a quality one will start to corrode over time. As a result, it will take a LOT more power to start a sump pump and keep it running for the same size HP as a normal electric motor that is running for a different job.

this is not the case in general; for example, an AC powered air compressor or room/central air conditioner is far more difficult a starting job than a sump pump. hence these types of motors are often high-torque capacitor start units with separate start windings. accordingly, startup current is very high.

ar-jedi
ColtRifle  [Member]
7/18/2010 9:55:36 AM
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By aks74man:
1Hp is = 750watts. startup on motors will bog down gen sets but you are in a vary low demand so i would think that almost any gen set would do.

you would be wrong, way wrong here.

ar-jedi




I think so too. Offering up my own anecdote: 120V pump, unknown HP, at the bottom of a 40ft well. 2 showers and a dishwasher of GPM When running normally on line power it'll kick on/off at least once/minute during a shower. That's a lot of stop/start.

My 5K/6.25K genny wont start it –– kind of hangs for a minute then gives me a ginormous fireball when I unplug it. it's on a 20A breaker when wired thru the box (not to the generator), so in theory its only 2400W (120*20). I suspect it has to do with the way the genny is wired and not supplying all of its junk to the one port we tried to use. One of the reasons we're looking at a (much) bigger whole-house generator option.





If you replace your pressure holding tank you'll be able to extend the run times between pump runs. I'm guessing that you have a 30 gallon tank or smaller? Remember, a pressure tank will be rated in total gallons but you don't have that many gallons of actual water. For example, my next house is going to have two 220 gallon tanks. A 220 gallon tank has about 30 gallons or so of drawdown before the well pump will kick on.

A well pump runs in a cool environment and the cold well water cools the motor. So, a well pump likes to run for long periods of time. Rapid and frequent start and stops is very hard on a well pump. Increase the size of your pressure tank (if you can) and you'll extend the life of your well pump and give you more stored water supply in between pump runs (which helps during a power outage!)

I would want to know how much amperage that well pump is using. It should EASILY run on that generator. With 120 volts and on a 20 amp breaker, your generator should barely even notice that load.
ar-jedi  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 9:56:29 AM
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By psgt:
The votage is 240 and about 300 ft deep well unknown gpm

you should figure on at least a 10KW generator to ensure you can start the pump with that 300' head.
ar-jedi

Bullshit. In a past house we used to have a 300 ft well with a 220 volt pump (think it was 1 hp but can't remember for sure). We ran that well pump on a 4500 watt surge/3500 watt running generator and had power to spare.

you don't know the motor HP nor the GPM. how can you tell what generator size will work? want to buy one and be wrong –– i.e., it turns out to be undersized? now you have an expensive paperweight.

ar-jedi


ColtRifle  [Member]
7/18/2010 10:02:39 AM
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
A 1 hp sump pump SHOULD draw about 750 watts running

a 1HP motor, of any type, requires about 1000W input. there are electrical, mechanical, and thermal losses here; getting a true 1HP at the shaft (=746W) requires about 1KW of electrical power input.

Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
and about 15-1800 starting.

from widely used motor starting power guidelines...
induction motor: 2.5 times the running current. so for 1HP = 1000W running = 2500W starting.
capacitor start motor: 3 times the running current. so for 1HP = 1000W running = 3000W starting.

Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
HOWEVER, the problem with sump pumps is they sit in water and even a quality one will start to corrode over time. As a result, it will take a LOT more power to start a sump pump and keep it running for the same size HP as a normal electric motor that is running for a different job.

this is not the case in general; for example, an AC powered air compressor or room/central air conditioner is far more difficult a starting job than a sump pump. hence these types of motors are often high-torque capacitor start units with separate start windings. accordingly, startup current is very high.

ar-jedi




I have personally tested the current draw on many motor powered units. Ones of ALL types that are in good shape will draw FAR less than your posted current draw figures. Those figures assume the MAX a given size motor will draw. However, if the motor and the item that the motor is running is in good shape, I have NEVER seen 2.5-3 times the running wattage to start.

I have seen 2.5-3 times the running wattage for startup on old, worn out motors mounted to worn out equipment.

So if the OP's well pump is in good shape it should run on FAR less than 2.5-3 times. On the other hand, if it's old and worn out, it COULD pull 2.5-3 times for startup. If I had a well that was pulling that much power, I'd budget to replace the well pump.
ColtRifle  [Member]
7/18/2010 10:04:38 AM
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By psgt:
The votage is 240 and about 300 ft deep well unknown gpm

you should figure on at least a 10KW generator to ensure you can start the pump with that 300' head.
ar-jedi

Bullshit. In a past house we used to have a 300 ft well with a 220 volt pump (think it was 1 hp but can't remember for sure). We ran that well pump on a 4500 watt surge/3500 watt running generator and had power to spare.

you don't know the motor HP nor the GPM. how can you tell what generator size will work? want to buy one and be wrong –– i.e., it turns out to be undersized? now you have an expensive paperweight.

ar-jedi






A well pump of the size of the OP's will NOT need a 10kw generator. Period.
ar-jedi  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 10:23:39 AM
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
A well pump of the size of the OP's will NOT need a 10kw generator. Period.

without at least measuring the running and startup currents there is no way to be sure less power will work. below is the type of meter i used to measure my well setup, 1.5HP at 225 feet. 13A running, about 50A startup.

OP:
the only way to be sure... borrow one of these types of meters. pull the cover off of either the main breaker box or the branch circuit junction box which feeds your well pump. draw out one leg of the 240Vac circuit supplying the pump (not both wires, just one wire). put the clamp over the wire. set the clamp to "peak hold" mode. cause the pump to run and get the inrush current. you may want to do this a couple of times to make sure you are getting good numbers. now set the probe to read normally, and see what the running current is. the running current will first start low (when the accumulator/pressure tank is at low pressure, say 35psi or so) and then will gradually increase as the system pressure comes up (to say 55psi or so). hence the highest running current will be just prior to the pressure switch turning off the well pump.

if your generator is undersized, one of two things will happen:

1) the voltage supplied by the generator will sag, causing an attendant increase in starting current (for the same power output, the current must increase inversely proportional to the voltage drop) –– and very high current during motor startup is a windings killer –– it makes a lot of heat and leads to stator/rotor insulation breakdown. (for this very reason, power company brownouts usually cause a lot more damage than blackouts; and why it is so important to turn off your air conditioner when the power is flickering).

2) the current needed to start the motor will exceed the generator breaker's limited surge ampacity, and it will trip. this is actually a more desirable situation than above.

ar-jedi



Ops  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 11:14:05 AM
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By aks74man:
1Hp is = 750watts. startup on motors will bog down gen sets but you are in a vary low demand so i would think that almost any gen set would do.

you would be wrong, way wrong here.

ar-jedi




I think so too. Offering up my own anecdote: 120V pump, unknown HP, at the bottom of a 40ft well. 2 showers and a dishwasher of GPM When running normally on line power it'll kick on/off at least once/minute during a shower. That's a lot of stop/start.

My 5K/6.25K genny wont start it –– kind of hangs for a minute then gives me a ginormous fireball when I unplug it. it's on a 20A breaker when wired thru the box (not to the generator), so in theory its only 2400W (120*20). I suspect it has to do with the way the genny is wired and not supplying all of its junk to the one port we tried to use. One of the reasons we're looking at a (much) bigger whole-house generator option.



Slice, are you sure it's a 120V pump? I've seen a schmittload of submersible pumps and a number of jet pumps, and NONE of them were 120V. You may want to double check and verify this.

Ops
HomeSlice  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 11:42:38 AM
Originally Posted By Ops:
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By aks74man:
1Hp is = 750watts. startup on motors will bog down gen sets but you are in a vary low demand so i would think that almost any gen set would do.

you would be wrong, way wrong here.

ar-jedi




I think so too. Offering up my own anecdote: 120V pump, unknown HP, at the bottom of a 40ft well. 2 showers and a dishwasher of GPM When running normally on line power it'll kick on/off at least once/minute during a shower. That's a lot of stop/start.

My 5K/6.25K genny wont start it –– kind of hangs for a minute then gives me a ginormous fireball when I unplug it. it's on a 20A breaker when wired thru the box (not to the generator), so in theory its only 2400W (120*20). I suspect it has to do with the way the genny is wired and not supplying all of its junk to the one port we tried to use. One of the reasons we're looking at a (much) bigger whole-house generator option.



Slice, are you sure it's a 120V pump? I've seen a schmittload of submersible pumps and a number of jet pumps, and NONE of them were 120V. You may want to double check and verify this.

Ops


Ops, the breaker for it is a single-slot 20A breaker. Aren't those 120? it has "normal" 12GA romex going into it. Last time the power was out I cut the feedline, rigged it up w/ a plug on the end and fed it to one of the 20A circuits on the generator, and it wouldnt get the pump running. I suspected at the time that was because the surge requirement was higher than what the genny would provide. It did bog down the engine on the generator. If it's 220/240, well, that would explain why I couldn't get it going...

We've lived here for 15 years and never had to pull the pump (knocking on wood) so I really don't know the specifics, only what my inexperience can tell me from the way its wired.

What should I look for short of pulling the pump?

Thanks,
-Slice

OP: Sorry for the hijack, we can take this offline if you want
ar-jedi  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 3:09:39 PM
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:
Ops, the breaker for it is a single-slot 20A breaker. Aren't those 120? it has "normal" 12GA romex going into it.

it sounds like a 120V. to clarify, does the breaker have a single (black, 12AWG) wire going into it?

ar-jedi

ColtRifle  [Member]
7/18/2010 8:38:59 PM
Originally Posted By Ops:
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By aks74man:
1Hp is = 750watts. startup on motors will bog down gen sets but you are in a vary low demand so i would think that almost any gen set would do.

you would be wrong, way wrong here.

ar-jedi




I think so too. Offering up my own anecdote: 120V pump, unknown HP, at the bottom of a 40ft well. 2 showers and a dishwasher of GPM When running normally on line power it'll kick on/off at least once/minute during a shower. That's a lot of stop/start.

My 5K/6.25K genny wont start it –– kind of hangs for a minute then gives me a ginormous fireball when I unplug it. it's on a 20A breaker when wired thru the box (not to the generator), so in theory its only 2400W (120*20). I suspect it has to do with the way the genny is wired and not supplying all of its junk to the one port we tried to use. One of the reasons we're looking at a (much) bigger whole-house generator option.



Slice, are you sure it's a 120V pump? I've seen a schmittload of submersible pumps and a number of jet pumps, and NONE of them were 120V. You may want to double check and verify this.

Ops


120 volt submersible pumps do exist but are rare and usually pump from more shallow depths.

I would like to know more about your generator. Many generators are overrated by the manufacturers as to their true capacity.
GlocksareGood  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 9:26:31 PM
This is my 3/4 HP submersible. Siitting about 120 ft. Resolution is 1 second for Power. One of these days I will redo the capture in inrush mode.

HomeSlice  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 10:06:06 PM
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:
Ops, the breaker for it is a single-slot 20A breaker. Aren't those 120? it has "normal" 12GA romex going into it.

it sounds like a 120V. to clarify, does the breaker have a single (black, 12AWG) wire going into it?

ar-jedi



Yep, 1 wire into the breaker.

Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
120 volt submersible pumps do exist but are rare and usually pump from more shallow depths.

I would like to know more about your generator. Many generators are overrated by the manufacturers as to their true capacity.


Our well is shallow by most definitions. Best guess is about 40' deep. Its what we call here a "surface well" –– a concrete cylinder about 3' in diameter. We pretty much live in a swampy area, the woods lay wet year-round. During the driest year I've never seen the well lower than 20ft below the surface.

Our current generator is a Troy-Bilt we bought at lowes on clearance. It's a 5K/6250 I think. Here's a link to the owner's manual

Thanks guys,
-Slice

NAM  [Team Member]
7/18/2010 11:19:14 PM
Originally Posted By jchewie1:
I have one of the Champion 3500 watt running / 4000 watt surge generators and a 3/4 HP pump that is about 70 feet deep.
This generator just barely starts my pump.
The little 6 or 6.5 hp engine just doesn't have the guts to keep going at the top end of its load for another second or two.
The pump not start if I am running anything else other than two or three lightbulbs.

I think you will probably wind up needing an 8hp or better engine with 5000 running watts minimum


I have the same generator, 3/4 HP pump, 240v, ~130 ft deep. Won't start the pump. engine dies.