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 Thorny shrubs/ bushes native to Texas?
SaltyDog  [Member]
2/28/2010 5:45:02 PM EST
does anybody know of a good sharp thorny bush/shrub that grows well in Texas. Looking to add some natural barriers to the property.
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CheeseSandwich  [Member]
2/28/2010 6:01:29 PM EST
First thing I thought of was a Blackberry Bush. It could serve a dual purpose as a natural barrier and a food source.
bobweaver  [Team Member]
2/28/2010 6:07:29 PM EST
Many of the holly varieties grow well in TX and some are very sharp.
odontia32m  [Team Member]
2/28/2010 7:57:45 PM EST
Google locust varieties of trees. I have them.
GENESMITH  [Life Member]
2/28/2010 8:29:54 PM EST
There was a thread a while back (a year ago maybe) about osage orange (sp?).


Might try the archive.


ETA: here is some google info:

HERE


Before the invention of barbed wire in the 1880's, many thousands of miles of hedge were constructed by planting young Osage Orange trees closely together in a line. The saplings were aggressively pruned to promote bushy growth. "Horse high, bull strong and hog tight." Those were the criteria for a good hedge made with Osage Orange. Tall enough that a horse would not jump it, stout enough that a bull would not push through it and woven so tightly that even a hog could not find its way through! After barbed wire made hedge fences obsolete, the trees still found use as a source of unbeatable fence posts. The wood is strong and so dense that it will neither rot nor succumb to the attacks of termites or other insects for decades. The trees also found use as an effective component of windbreaks and shelterbelts.

Ndenway  [Team Member]
2/28/2010 9:31:16 PM EST
stinging "bull nettles" planted pretty thick.
douglasmorris99  [Team Member]
3/1/2010 6:05:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By odontia32m:
Google locust varieties of trees. I have them.


want some more???



come and get em..

thorns like railroad spikes,,,,tractor tires, wagon tires, quad tires, be damn truck tires one of these days, when I get careless...
douglasmorris99  [Team Member]
3/1/2010 6:06:45 AM EST
Originally Posted By SaltyDog:
does anybody know of a good sharp thorny bush/shrub that grows well in Texas. Looking to add some natural barriers to the property.


you can come out to my wood lot in Lamar Co, and dig up all you want, I have more stinging crap out there than I can name come summer

vines, locust trees, holly, nettles, tangle-foot etc..come and get em!
TheRedGoat  [Team Member]
3/1/2010 6:19:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By SaltyDog:
does anybody know of a good sharp thorny bush/shrub that grows well in Texas. Looking to add some natural barriers to the property.


You are going to need to narrow down the phrase 'in Texas'.

Where in Texas?

TRG
bogomil  [Member]
3/1/2010 6:25:53 AM EST
Osage Orange or Bois d' arc was used as a living fence. Honey Locust are a nightmare of thorns. Hercules' Club is pretty spiny. You might could plant seedling Jujube's that would be spiny and give you and the wildlife fruit.
Colby  [Team Member]
3/1/2010 6:53:20 AM EST
+1 on the Bois D'Arc and Locusts.

Have you thought about yuccas too? The tubers have several uses, and getting stuck by those leaves sucks.

Locust trees have spines that are a real PITA. They will poke holes in your tires like somebody else has mentioned.

Pyracantha would probably grow where you're at as well.

Blackberries should grow like a nuisance if you are east of 1-35.
HellifIknow  [Team Member]
3/1/2010 6:58:25 AM EST
agarita––Mahonia trifoliolata

Very similar to holly. Doesn't have needles so tires and such are safe.
Produces a small red berry that can be made into jellies or wine.
stickbow  [Member]
3/1/2010 4:13:51 PM EST
Since you are in Texas - dare I mention CACTUS.................or just call the Texas A & M Ag. in Kingsville, Tx - they will look out their window and name about 5 plants that all have thorns....and don't forget Pyracantha - 1 1/2 in. thorns...grow from San Antone up past Dallas............
CarbineDad  [Team Member]
3/1/2010 4:20:32 PM EST
My Father would probably want me to post "Cockleburs" here
showpare  [Team Member]
3/1/2010 4:44:17 PM EST
mesquite?
steady  [Team Member]
3/15/2010 5:47:07 PM EST
Palm tree- shoots at base are like bambo with teeth!
wsix  [Team Member]
3/15/2010 6:54:53 PM EST
Originally Posted By odontia32m:
Google locust varieties of trees. I have them.


Locust also has medicinal properties.

goldtop  [Team Member]
3/16/2010 4:54:21 AM EST
Where in Texas? South of San Antonio, most things are out to get you. Black Brush, Quahilla, honey locust. They all suck to walk through.

East Texas has its own set of unpleasant plants that have been listed.

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EvilVaquero  [Team Member]
3/16/2010 6:35:52 AM EST
Mesquite, Palo Verde, Nopal Cactus, Greasewood...it's endless....lol
texasthom  [Member]
3/16/2010 7:35:29 AM EST
Another Agarita; also, Mesquite, Agave
GM15  [Member]
3/16/2010 5:22:46 PM EST
Originally Posted By douglasmorris99:
Originally Posted By SaltyDog:
does anybody know of a good sharp thorny bush/shrub that grows well in Texas. Looking to add some natural barriers to the property.


you can come out to my wood lot in Lamar Co, and dig up all you want, I have more stinging crap out there than I can name come summer

vines, locust trees, holly, nettles, tangle-foot etc..come and get em!



This!
I'm in North Central Texas and most of the underbrush clings to you with some sort of barb or thorn! They all grow too well!
amftx  [Team Member]
3/17/2010 6:34:53 PM EST
Not "native" but knockout roses are quite thorny and would make a nice barrier.
HomeSlice  [Team Member]
3/17/2010 7:25:43 PM EST
Well, according to one of the songs my kids sing yellow roses are native to TX

Seriously, tho, we transplanted a wild yellow rose near the house under a few of the windows several years ago. They grew like mad and are wicked thorny. Not sure if your thinking for barriers near a building, property line, or some other use.

-Slice
ntxyankee  [Team Member]
3/19/2010 6:42:43 AM EST
What are knockout roses?

There was a fence thread that talked about a version of a yellow rose that grew into an impenetrable tall hedge but I do not remember any more.
Reorx  [Member]
3/19/2010 1:47:28 PM EST
Don't know where you are in TX but here in FL, Ceutury plants (Agava americana) are popular >>>



The points on those leaves can really put a hurtin' on you. The edges of the leaves are no picnic either!
dawgm  [Member]
3/19/2010 2:18:22 PM EST
some holly will grow just about anywhere from what I've seen. also, some bamboo makes a nice fence in short order and has thousands of uses
SGTCap  [Team Member]
3/19/2010 3:05:55 PM EST
Originally Posted By showpare:
mesquite?


my first thought
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