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 1000 gallon propane tank.......
MrClean4Hire  [Team Member]
11/28/2009 12:57:54 AM
On average how long would this last with a stove, dryer, water heater? Average use family of 6.

Heat will be electric, there will be a back up propane wall heater for emergency.
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Fullpower  [Member]
11/28/2009 1:55:51 AM
Easy:
1000 GALLONS/ (divided by) the number of gallons used per day.
actually, the nominal 1000 gallon capacity will not be available, the propane
delivery driver will probably only fill the tank 85 or 90 percent full, to allow room
in the tank for expansion when HOT.
so in that case, take the full percentage times the nominal tank capacity and
THEN divide by your daily usage, giving the number of days till empty.
Better yet, call the propane supplier, and get on "auto- fill" status.
then dont worry about it, they will just send you a bill.
GunnyG  [Team Member]
11/28/2009 2:11:14 AM

Originally Posted By MrClean4Hire:
On average how long would this last with a stove, dryer, water heater? Average use family of 6.

Heat will be electric, there will be a back up propane wall heater for emergency.


What's your local price for propane? I'd shudder to think what it would cost me to fill it around here.
ColtRifle  [Member]
11/28/2009 2:15:54 AM
Originally Posted By MrClean4Hire:
On average how long would this last with a stove, dryer, water heater? Average use family of 6.

Heat will be electric, there will be a back up propane wall heater for emergency.




Not sure of an exact price but a would suspect many years at that consumption rate. 5 yrs +

Heat is what consumes the most propane.

I know some people who run a cook stove on less than 25 gallons a year......100 lb tank.

Consider a dual fuel heating system. Heat pump for cool temps and propane furnace for real low temps.
KEA  [Member]
11/28/2009 3:02:57 AM
We have a 1000 gal tank (max fill to 800 gal) that would last the two of us about 18 months (usually fill once a year with about 550 to 600 gal). We have gas stove top, gas hot water, and one 30K & 10K BTU gas space heaters for 2000 square feet (west central MS).

Gas heat is used to down around 35 DEG F then the fireplace is cranked up for primary heat.

Depending on where you are in TN and how often you dry clothes, 60 to 70 gal / month would be about right. Local gas company can give you some idea based on usage rate of your appliances.
TheGrayMan  [Team Member]
11/28/2009 3:04:31 AM
I don't know if it would last for years. A 1000-gallon Propane tank, filled to 80% capacity, will run this generator, at half-load, 24/7, for 20 days:

douglasmorris99  [Team Member]
11/28/2009 8:19:36 AM
Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
I don't know if it would last for years. A 1000-gallon Propane tank, filled to 80% capacity, will run this generator, at half-load, 24/7, for 20 days:

http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg286/TGrayman/generator/exterior.jpg




I WANT THAT>>.
how much, how to, how DO?????

CHEF
berdan  [Member]
11/28/2009 8:45:36 AM
Using gas for cooking and baking only, I used 126.1 gallons in 36 mos. So, 850 gallons would last (ME) 19 1/2 years.
Fuggit  [Team Member]
11/28/2009 9:11:02 AM
I had this 1000 gallon tank installed underground a few weeks ago. Like other folks have said, it only gets filled with 800 gallons. It only feeds a stove/oven and the back up gennie. I have no idea how long it will last.

Argon3  [Team Member]
11/28/2009 9:11:28 AM
A 1000 Gal tank only has 600 Gal of usable Gas
Now thats by a Manual so YMMV
Grove  [Member]
11/28/2009 10:32:58 AM
Originally Posted By Argon3:
A 1000 Gal tank only has 600 Gal of usable Gas
Now thats by a Manual so YMMV


I think you mean 800. A propane tank can be filled to 80% capacity.

Grove
Grove  [Member]
11/28/2009 10:35:23 AM
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
Originally Posted By MrClean4Hire:
On average how long would this last with a stove, dryer, water heater? Average use family of 6.

Heat will be electric, there will be a back up propane wall heater for emergency.




Not sure of an exact price but a would suspect many years at that consumption rate. 5 yrs +

Heat is what consumes the most propane.

I know some people who run a cook stove on less than 25 gallons a year......100 lb tank.

Consider a dual fuel heating system. Heat pump for cool temps and propane furnace for real low temps.


We moved our propane tanks while doing a landscaping project. We used a 100lb tank for temp use and it lasted us about 3 months on a water heater and cooktop.

Grove

paul1911  [Life Member]
11/29/2009 11:11:46 AM
My guess is 3-4 years. Based on the fact I have a 1000 gal, but I use it for heat too.
1_BIG_BUNKER  [Team Member]
11/29/2009 12:32:42 PM
That is a hard question to answer. It is like answering the question, how long is a string?

Heating water for six people is going to be the biggest drain on fuel if you ask me. I mean that hot water is for showers everyday, washing clothes, dishes, shaving, washing hands, it is a lot of hot water.

People use A LOT more water than they think. The average person in the US uses well over 150 gallons a day of water with the Soviet Socialist Republic of California at 192 and Sacramento at 280 gallons per person per day. Granted this is city wide, but still that's a lot of water.

Most families out in the country stay under 100 gallons per day per person, and septics are sized on 125 gallons per person per day, well it goes by bedrooms, but it comes out to this figure on average. Let's say 75 gallons of water and 25% of that is hot water. That is 18.75 gallons per person per day times six people so you have 112 gallons of hot water use.


I'm not sure how good your water heater is, but simple math says it takes 8.4 BTU's to heat one gallon of water one degree. If ground water is 55 degrees and you bring it up to 120 degrees, that is a 65 degree increase.

So 65 times 8.4 equals 546 BTU's per gallon times 112 gallons equals 61,152 BTU's. There is about 91,000 BTU's per gallon in propane, I can't remember the EXACT figure, but 91,000 is very close. Add in the inefficiency of your heater as well as maintaining the water temp, and I think you will use about a gallon a day just to heat water for six people.


Cooking, drying laundry, and your part time heater, will probably be another .25 gallon a day at the most. I remember reading that an average dryer uses 40 gallons of LP for about 400 loads of clothes.

So, at 800 gallons divided by 1.25 gallons a day worse case, and you have around 640 days worth of fuel.

FirefighterEd  [Member]
11/29/2009 1:44:19 PM
Big Bunker is right on target !

You should be able to plan on 18 months and may well make 24 on 800 gallons.
JPC  [Team Member]
11/29/2009 1:57:03 PM
figure your BTU usage, 1 gallon LPG=90,000 actually 91600,but easier to use 90,000

There should be a % gauge on your tank. 85% is max fill,or your relief valve may go.
Underground tanks need a sacrifical anoid attached as well as being coated.
Gun_Crank  [Team Member]
11/29/2009 2:08:38 PM
Can 1000 gallon tanks be buried in colder climates?

What kind of an enclosure do you need to put around the valve?
paul1911  [Life Member]
11/29/2009 3:19:30 PM
Fuggit, how much was the buried tank?
JPC  [Team Member]
11/29/2009 4:05:23 PM
Underground tanks have a "riser" type filer valve. They also should come with a 1 1/2 ' extended lid. They can be put in most all environments.
Usually recommended to dig 1' extra dimension around tank,and use pea gravel or 1' round gravel.
High water table areas make sure you coat the tank properly.

I've put them on some very step grades,where a "self" was built in the ground. Metal strapping was then anchored around the tank.
Then staked in the ground,aka retention wall deadman.
jagchaser  [Team Member]
11/29/2009 4:08:25 PM
I have a 1000 and a 500 plumbed in tandem. They fill me up to 85-90 percent in the cool season, but rarely over 80 in the summer.

How long it will last depends on lots of variables. My tanks will almost last all winter, but I use them for main heat too.

1.05 per gallon price

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
snakeshooter1  [Member]
11/29/2009 5:07:54 PM
Originally Posted By Argon3:
A 1000 Gal tank only has 600 Gal of usable Gas
Now thats by a Manual so YMMV



wrong if it's new it will hold 900 gallons of liguid @80% because ten percent boils off to form the vapor that you use to fuel your appliances. I have installed hundreds of tanks in the 17 years that I worked for a gas company. all inside appliances and most outdoor (grills, fire pits) run off of 11 inch water column or just a little less(11 inch water column = 1/2 psi approximately). As someone stated earlier just do the math, I'm thinking atleast 3 years at your usage rate but do the numbers to be sure. edited to add that 10% will always be there as vapor unless you completely empty the tank, that is why the gauge can show zero and everything will still work for a while.


Fuggit  [Team Member]
11/29/2009 5:19:17 PM
Originally Posted By paul1911:
Fuggit, how much was the buried tank?


$2700 and change installed. $2.09 a gallon for the propane.
jagchaser  [Team Member]
11/29/2009 6:27:14 PM
Originally Posted By Fuggit:
Originally Posted By paul1911:
Fuggit, how much was the buried tank?


$2700 and change installed. $2.09 a gallon for the propane.


Damn I am glad I filled my tank last month!! $1.05

What are the benefits for a buried tank? I bought a slightly used 1000 gal for $500 and parts to plumb it cost about 150

steady  [Team Member]
11/29/2009 7:10:52 PM
I can verify that price. I have a 250 gal tank. Use it to heat the pool. Heating the pool or spa can suck it dowm. Cooking and light stuff runs a long time on the small tanks I have used camping.
paul1911  [Life Member]
11/29/2009 7:55:40 PM
I pay $1.59 on a pre pay. They care me $60 per year for a tank rental. Most people leave them above ground.
stereoman405  [Team Member]
11/29/2009 8:48:38 PM
We have three adults and three little ones and only use LP for cooking baking. It took us 2.5 years to go through 80 gallons. Not that I cook brakfast every morning our use is slightly up from that. HTH
JPC  [Team Member]
11/29/2009 8:48:50 PM
Underground tanks are out of sight. No real benefit but that,and it will stay cooler.
Also won't need to be painted. Paint any above ground tank a light color,to reflect sunlight.
New tanks need to be purged with methanol,to get rid of any moisture,or your regulator may freeze up.
Also if in a snow plow area please flag the tank.
Plow drivers like to push snow way back,for next storm.


Most companies want you to use a minimum of 2 tank fills when renting.
ie 500 gal tank at 85%= 425 gallons x2= 850 gallons,,just a general rule.
Also often they will not sell the 1st stage regulator,at the tank.
Why? nonpaying customers can then get locked off. A POL lock can be installed so you can't use the remaining LPG.
GlocksareGood  [Team Member]
11/29/2009 8:58:12 PM
We have a tankless WH, a cook stove, dryer and a fireplace but we seldom use it. Two of us. We use ~ 100 gallons a year.
Templar223  [Team Member]
11/29/2009 11:48:34 PM
As a kid in Central IL, we lived on a 500 gal tank. Usually got filled three times each year, basically twice for winter and once for the rest of the year. All gas heat/stove/water heat. Dryer was electric.

I seem to remember it would take an extra fill if it was REALLY cold any given winter.

For what it's worth - as I remember it 30-odd years ago.

John


ETA: They didn't let us "run dry" before refilling. Usually it would be something like 200-250 gallons added per 'fill'.
TheGrayMan  [Team Member]
11/30/2009 12:03:12 AM
Originally Posted By douglasmorris99:
Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
I don't know if it would last for years. A 1000-gallon Propane tank, filled to 80% capacity, will run this generator, at half-load, 24/7, for 20 days:

http://i251.photobucket.com/albums/gg286/TGrayman/generator/exterior.jpg




I WANT THAT>>.
how much, how to, how DO?????

CHEF


Kohler 12RES standby generator. Self-starting, self-exercising, and puts out about 11kW on natural gas, 12kW on propane. Keeps track of line voltage, and if mains go offline, it starts itself. Once the field is stable, it kicks the house load over on the automatic transfer switch, and runs everything. Once mains come back online, it runs a cool-down cycle, and shuts itself off.

Completely fire-and-forget. Highly recommended.
ToddWW  [Member]
11/30/2009 2:10:04 AM
Our 250g tank is going to last us over 2 years it looks like
Water heater & Cook top / Oven only.

(On demand water heater.)

2 of us.

SigOwner_P229  [Member]
11/30/2009 3:26:44 PM
As stated before, thats a tough question, and depends on usage, but you've already been given the evidence.

We have 3 1,000 gallon tanks, and go through at least 1 fill-up for each tank per year. But then, we also use them on the grain dryers so that won't help you much for comparison.
Barney_Calhoun  [Team Member]
12/1/2009 1:33:02 PM
I'm certain you could halve it's use if you cut out the dryer and used one of these contraptions.

Cacinok  [Team Member]
12/1/2009 1:47:49 PM
we have a 300 gallon tank and only run a horrendously inefficient hot water heater on it. we refill three times a year. most recent refill was $1.69/gallon. we have 5 in the house.
POG926  [Team Member]
12/1/2009 11:05:26 PM
Fuggit, how much was the buried tank?


Mine was free.
Sparks59  [Member]
12/3/2009 12:12:14 AM
Originally Posted By Grove:
Originally Posted By Argon3:
A 1000 Gal tank only has 600 Gal of usable Gas
Now thats by a Manual so YMMV


I think you mean 800. A propane tank can be filled to 80% capacity.

Grove


why wouldn't a 1000lb tank hold 1000...be tested to 120pct.... take into account the expansion....

That's like buying only 3/4 full gas...or buying a 12pk and only getting 9 beers....
Fuggit  [Team Member]
12/3/2009 11:04:11 AM
Originally Posted By Sparks59:
Originally Posted By Grove:
Originally Posted By Argon3:
A 1000 Gal tank only has 600 Gal of usable Gas
Now thats by a Manual so YMMV


I think you mean 800. A propane tank can be filled to 80% capacity.

Grove


why wouldn't a 1000lb tank hold 1000...be tested to 120pct.... take into account the expansion....

That's like buying only 3/4 full gas...or buying a 12pk and only getting 9 beers....


Propane is used as a vapor, not a liquid. If it was full of liquid, there would be no vapor.

entejager  [Team Member]
12/3/2009 11:29:11 AM
Here in the NE my 3800 sq sf house, propane forced hot air, water htr, stove, dryer. family of 4, go thru about 1600 - 2000 gal per yr depending on the winters.
Looking to add alternative coal burning, carbon belching stove to furnace in basemant.
wshbrngr  [Member]
12/3/2009 11:58:16 AM
Originally Posted By entejager:
Here in the NE my 3800 sq sf house, propane forced hot air, water htr, stove, dryer. family of 4, go thru about 1600 - 2000 gal per yr depending on the winters.
Looking to add alternative coal burning, carbon belching stove to furnace in basemant.


Easy for you in PA, they probably sell it at convienence stores......
I have been trying to get some coal here in TX. I know they mine it here, but trying to find a place to buy (small amounts), no luck so far.


JPC  [Team Member]
12/3/2009 3:42:37 PM
The vapor area is called the wetted area,were LPG in liquid is stored. The vapor area is what is used.
As the vapor is used up,the wetted area boils off to vapor.

Liquid LPG is around -40 degrees F, you can get instant frost burn from the liquid LPG.
Once pressure is relieved LPG expansion is 270:1 gallon liquid.
I still have some white areas on my fingers from sealing a relief valve.
I had chemical resistant gloves on too.

Yes I sold propane and propane accessories.
GunnyG  [Team Member]
12/3/2009 4:22:26 PM

Originally Posted By JPC:
The vapor area is called the wetted area,were LPG in liquid is stored. The vapor area is what is used.
As the vapor is used up,the wetted area boils off to vapor.

Liquid LPG is around -40 degrees F, you can get instant frost burn from the liquid LPG.
Once pressure is relieved LPG expansion is 270:1 gallon liquid.
I still have some white areas on my fingers from sealing a relief valve.
I had chemical resistant gloves on too.

Yes I sold propane and propane accessories.


Tacoma's Atlas Foundry 2007 BLEVE Explosion
Feral  [Moderator]
12/3/2009 4:46:18 PM
I have two questions:

1) What's the service life of a buried tank vs. an above ground tank?

2) Is there an upper limit to how far you can put the tank from the house?
JPC  [Team Member]
12/3/2009 10:14:20 PM
Originally Posted By Feral:
I have two questions:

1) What's the service life of a buried tank vs. an above ground tank?

2) Is there an upper limit to how far you can put the tank from the house?


1- could be indefinite depending on where you are. Also if you properly preped the tank and excavated site.

2- Just a minimum distance. If you are ways away,increase poly tube size from 1/2 od {normal} to 3/4 ID . Also choose correct regulator for apps.

I have placed tanks upto 300yds from houses.

Rego handbook,,,,Rego and Fisher are regulator suppliers

http://www.regoproducts.com/PDFs/LP-Gas_Servicemans_Manual.pdf
Fuggit  [Team Member]
12/3/2009 10:23:04 PM
When they buried my 1k gallon tank, they hooked up two 17lb. magnesium anode bags to it. Like a sacrificial zinc is to an outboard motor. The electrolysis reaction from two dissimilar metals will attack the sacrificial metal (magnesium) versus the nobel metal that the tank is made of.
JPC  [Team Member]
12/3/2009 11:09:19 PM
Originally Posted By Fuggit:
When they buried my 1k gallon tank, they hooked up two 17lb. magnesium anode bags to it. Like a sacrificial zinc is to an outboard motor. The electrolysis reaction from two dissimilar metals will attack the sacrificial metal (magnesium) versus the nobel metal that the tank is made of.


Hope they cadwelded the anoids to the tank.

Fuggit  [Team Member]
12/4/2009 7:15:43 AM
Originally Posted By JPC:
Originally Posted By Fuggit:
When they buried my 1k gallon tank, they hooked up two 17lb. magnesium anode bags to it. Like a sacrificial zinc is to an outboard motor. The electrolysis reaction from two dissimilar metals will attack the sacrificial metal (magnesium) versus the nobel metal that the tank is made of.


Hope they cadwelded the anoids to the tank.



Nope. The anodes had #12 insulated copper wires hooked to them/in them. The bags were placed in holes 2' below the tank, wetted and the wire was connected to the riser pipe of the tank.

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