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 Your Top 10 U.S. Generals List
SecurityPolice  [Team Member]
8/26/2009 12:22:41 PM
What are your top 10 U.S. Generals (or Admirals) in US History? And Yes, Confederate Generals count at American Generals.

1) Gen. George S Patton
2) Gen. Stonewall Jackson
3) Gen. Robert E. Lee
4) Gen. George Washington
5) Admiral Chester Nimtz
6) Gen. Omar Bradley
7) Gen. Douglas MacArthur
8) Gen William Sherman
9) Gen. Ulysses S. Grant
10) Gen. Dwight Eisenhower

So what are your list of top 10 US Generals and why?

Thanks,
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HeadHunter223  [Team Member]
8/26/2009 1:22:55 PM
Agree with most, but why not General Schwarzkopf?
SecurityPolice  [Team Member]
8/26/2009 2:36:24 PM
Storming Norman would be #11 or #12 on my list due to his liberation of Kuwait!
Ameshawki  [Member]
8/26/2009 2:48:01 PM
Originally Posted By SecurityPolice:
What are your top 10 U.S. Generals (or Admirals) in US History? And Yes, Confederate Generals count at American Generals.

1) Gen. George S Patton - Over rated. Good but not number one good
2) Gen. Stonewall Jackson - Yes
3) Gen. Robert E. Lee -Yes
4) Gen. George Washington - HIGHLY over rated as a general. Actually lost more of his battles than he won.
5) Admiral Chester Nimtiz - Yes
6) Gen. Omar Bradley - Good, is many ways better than Patton. Not sure if he's top ten good.
7) Gen. Douglas MacArthur - yes, a prima dona, but his SW Pacific campaign was arguebly the best run of the war
8) Gen William Sherman - yes, understood war better than almost anyone else. Probably did more to end the Civil War than any other Union general.
9) Gen. Ulysses S. Grant - yes. Sloppy, not terribly original, but he beat down Lee when no one else could
10) Gen. Dwight Eisenhower - yes. Not a conventional general by any means, tactically was rather weak, but understood coalition warfare when it was still just an idea

My number one - Marshall. The Army in WWII was his creation. He trained it, hand picked virtually all the general officers, determined the strategy. He WAS the US Army in WWII.
Somewhere in the top ten - Lockwood. Lead the USN submarine campaign in WWII. It was the subs that beat Japan. Paid a terrible price doing it.

Honorable mention - Spruance. Won at Midway. In my view smarter than Halsey by a good bit.
Honorable mention - Arnold. Hap not Benedict.
Honorable mention - Smith. Howlin' Mad USMC. The amphibious war in the Pacific was largely his doing.

WW I - frankly not a very distinguished bunch. They got the job done, but had massive manpower superiority against a very tired Germany.

Schwartzkopf - did well. Did very well. But given the massive force at his disposal he should have done well. The left hook thru the desert was the obvious move.

So what are your list of top 10 US Generals and why?

Thanks,


mr_hankie  [Team Member]
8/27/2009 9:47:36 PM
Originally Posted By SecurityPolice:
What are your top 10 U.S. Generals (or Admirals) in US History? And Yes, Confederate Generals count at American Generals.

1) Gen. George S Patton-this sob was responsible for the deaths of way too many tank crews in WWII. I f he had said "go" to the T26 we would have won the war months earlier.
2) Gen. Stonewall Jackson-a fine general, but way too wrapped up in religion.
3) Gen. Robert E. Lee-good man, but another religious fanatic.
4) Gen. George Washington-a fine leader. Good morals and well respected.
5) Admiral Chester Nimtz-another that could have save countless lives if he listened to his staff.
6) Gen. Omar Bradley-the soldier general. A solid choice.
7) Gen. Douglas MacArthur-asshole, his way or the highway..
8) Gen William Sherman-did what it took to take out the South.
9) Gen. Ulysses S. Grant- another drunk.
10) Gen. Dwight Eisenhower-peacemaker.

So what are your list of top 10 US Generals and why?

Thanks,


I would add:

General Maurice Rose
On March 30, 1945 a few miles south of the city of Paderborn in a rural forest area, General Rose rounded a corner in his jeep and found himself surrounded by several German tanks. As he withdrew his pistol, a young German tank commander shot the General.
Rose was the highest-ranking American killed by enemy fire in the European Theater of Operations during the war. (Lieutenant General Lesley J. McNair was killed by friendly fire in Normandy in July 1944.)

Gen. James Maurice "Jumpin' Jim" Gavin
Rose to the rank of Lieutenant General in the United States Army. He was also referred to as "The Jumping General", because of his practice of taking part in combat drops with the paratroopers he commanded.
Gavin was the youngest U.S. Major General commanding a division during World War Two.[1] During combat, he was known for his habit of carrying an M1 Garand rifle, as opposed to the pistols traditionally carried by officers.
His men, who respected him a great deal, affectionately referred to him as "Slim Jim" due to his athletic figure. Gavin fought against segregation in the U.S. Army, which gained him some notoriety.
Among his decorations, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Silver Star and the Purple Heart. He was also awarded the British Distinguished Service Order.

General of the Army George Catlett Marshall
(December 31, 1880 – October 16, 1959) was an American military leader, Chief of Staff of the Army, Secretary of State, and the third Secretary of Defense. Once noted as the "organizer of victory" by Winston Churchill for his leadership of the Allied victory in World War II,[1] Marshall served as the U.S. Army Chief of Staff during the war and as the chief military adviser to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. As Secretary of State his name was given to the Marshall Plan, for which he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1953.[2]

LTG Nathan Bedford Forrest
He was the only soldier South or North to join the military as a private and rise to the rank of Lieutenant General. He has been described as "a soft-spoken gentleman of marked placidity", and as "an overbearing bully of homicidal wrath." Nathan Bedford Forrest, the South's "Wizard of the Saddle" was an uneducated backwoodsman and self made millionaire who inspite of having no formal military training has been described by Lee, Sherman, and other leaders of both sides as the greatest cavalry commander of either army. Perhaps his greatest compliment was paid by his enemy, William T. Sherman, who called him "the very devil" and is reported to have pronounced Forrest "the most remarkable man our civil war produced on either side . . . He had a genius which was to me incomprehensible." Forrest himself summarized his military genius with a few brief words, "War means fighting and fighting means killing." Inspite of his maxim to "get there first with the most men," he faced overwhelming odds on almost every battlefield yet never lost a battle that he personally commanded until his last battle in 1865 when he was hopelessly out manned by cavalry with the new repeating rifles.
Never one to "lead from the rear" Forrest had twenty-nine horses shot out from under him and personally killed thirty Union soldiers. He was seriously wounded four times, once by one of his own subordinate officers who during an argument shot Forrest in the hip from point blank range. (From various accounts it appears possible that Lieutenant Gould's gun went off by accident. In retaliation, or in self defense, Forrest stabbed his assailant with a pen knife inflicting a fatal wound.)

General of the Army Henry Harley "Hap" Arnold (June 25, 1886 – January 15, 1950) was a five-star general officer holding the grades of General of the Army and later General of the Air Force. He is the only officer to ever hold a five-star grade in two different U.S. military services.[1] Arnold was an aviation pioneer and the Chief of the United States Army Air Corps (from 1938), the Commanding General of the U.S. Army Air Forces (from 1941 until 1945), and the only ever five-star General of the Air Force (starting in 1949).
Instructed in flying by the Wright Brothers, Arnold was one of the first military pilots worldwide, and the second rated pilot in the history of the United States Air Force. He overcame a fear of flying that resulted from his experiences with early flight, oversaw the expansion of the Air Service during World War I, and became a protégé of Gen. Billy Mitchell, all of which at times nearly ended his aeronautical career.
Arnold became a powerful advocate for creation of an independent Air Force and played a key role in the political struggles over it with the hierarchies of the United States Army and United States Navy. He rose to command the Army Air Forces immediately prior to U.S. entry into World War II and directed its expansion into the largest and most powerful Air Force in the world. An advocate of technological research and development, Arnold's tenure saw the development of the intercontinental bomber, the jet fighter, the extensive use of radar, global airlift, and atomic warfare as mainstays of modern air power.

Albert Sidney Johnston (February 2, 1803 – April 6, 1862) was a career United States Army officer, a Texas Army general, and a Confederate States general. He saw extensive combat during his military career, fighting actions in the Texas War of Independence, the Mexican-American War, the Utah War, as well as the American Civil War.
Considered by Confederate President Jefferson Davis to be the finest general officer in the Confederacy before the emergence of Robert E. Lee, he was killed early in the Civil War at the Battle of Shiloh and was the highest ranking officer, Union or Confederate, killed during the entire war.[1] Davis believed the loss of Johnston "was the turning point of our fate"

Just my take on Generals.............wanna talk company grade officers

Sorry I don't know a lot about Naval history..............

Raphael Semmes (September 27, 1809 – August 30, 1877)
In April 1861, Semmes was accepted into the Confederate navy as a commander and was sent to New Orleans, Louisiana, to convert a steamer into the cruiser/commerce raider CSS Sumter. In June 1861, Semmes ran the Federal blockade in the Sumter and commenced a career as one of the greatest commerce raiders in naval history.
Semmes's command of CSS Sumter would last six months. He raided U.S. commercial shipping in the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean, accounting for 18 merchant vessels while eluding pursuing Union warships. In January 1862, the Sumter required a major overhaul. Semmes attempted to have her repaired at Gibraltar, but the arrival of U.S. warships ended her career. The Union ships took up stations outside of Gibraltar to wait for him.
Semmes sold his ship, and he and his crew travelled to England, where he was promoted to captain. He then went to the Portuguese island of Madeira in the Atlantic and converted a commercial vessel into a warship that became world-famous as CSS Alabama. Semmes sailed on the Alabama from August 1862 to June 1864. His operations carried him from the Atlantic, to the Gulf of Mexico, around the Cape of Good Hope, and into the East Indies. During this cruise, the Alabama captured 69 U.S. merchantmen and destroyed one U.S. warship, the USS Hatteras.
The Alabama returned to the Atlantic and made port in Cherbourg, France, where she was blockaded by the USS Kearsarge. Captain Semmes took Alabama out on June 19, 1864 and met the Kearsarge in one of the most famous naval engagements of the war. The commander of the Kearsarge had secretly turned his ship into a makeshift ironclad by draping the sides with heavy chains. This, combined with the poor quality of gunpowder on the Alabama, ensured a Union victory. As the Alabama was sinking, Semmes threw his sword into the sea, thereby depriving Kearsage's Captain John Winslow the traditional ceremony of having it handed to him as the victor. Semmes was wounded in the battle, but was rescued, along with forty one of his crewmen[1], by the British yacht Deerhound. Semmes went to England where he recovered.
Semmes made his way back to the Confederacy, where he was promoted to rear admiral in February 1865, and during the last months of the war he commanded the James River Squadron. With the fall of Richmond, Virginia, in April 1865, Semmes supervised the destruction of his squadron and was appointed as a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army. His sailors were turned into an infantry unit and dubbed the "Naval Brigade".[citation needed] Their intention was to join Lee's army after burning their vessels; however, Lee's army was already cut off from Richmond and most of Semmes' men boarded a train and escaped to join Joseph E. Johnston's army in North Carolina.[citation needed] A few men of the Naval Brigade were able to join with Lee's rear guard and fought at Sayler's Creek. Semmes and the Naval Brigade surrendered to William T. Sherman and were paroled at Durham Station, N.C.
dirtface  [Member]
8/30/2009 6:48:56 AM
1. STONEWALL JACKSON
2. STONEWALL JACKSON
3. STONEWALL JACKSON
4. STONEWALL JACKSON
5......... You get my point


Had he lived, NYC and DC would have been ash
Regency  [Member]
8/31/2009 12:52:37 PM
U. S. Grant was not that great.... atleast compared to his opponents
mhall8811  [Member]
8/31/2009 1:22:31 PM
Originally Posted By mr_hankie:




LTG Nathan Bedford Forrest
He was the only soldier South or North to join the military as a private and rise to the rank of Lieutenant General. He has been described as "a soft-spoken gentleman of marked placidity", and as "an overbearing bully of homicidal wrath." Nathan Bedford Forrest, the South's "Wizard of the Saddle" was an uneducated backwoodsman and self made millionaire who inspite of having no formal military training has been described by Lee, Sherman, and other leaders of both sides as the greatest cavalry commander of either army. Perhaps his greatest compliment was paid by his enemy, William T. Sherman, who called him "the very devil" and is reported to have pronounced Forrest "the most remarkable man our civil war produced on either side . . . He had a genius which was to me incomprehensible." Forrest himself summarized his military genius with a few brief words, "War means fighting and fighting means killing." Inspite of his maxim to "get there first with the most men," he faced overwhelming odds on almost every battlefield yet never lost a battle that he personally commanded until his last battle in 1865 when he was hopelessly out manned by cavalry with the new repeating rifles.
Never one to "lead from the rear" Forrest had twenty-nine horses shot out from under him and personally killed thirty Union soldiers. He was seriously wounded four times, once by one of his own subordinate officers who during an argument shot Forrest in the hip from point blank range. (From various accounts it appears possible that Lieutenant Gould's gun went off by accident. In retaliation, or in self defense, Forrest stabbed his assailant with a pen knife inflicting a fatal wound.)



This!
Ben Hampton did a wonderful piece of art with Gen Forrest as the focal point of a Confederate collage called "Standing Proud". Hangs proudly on my wall.
Sharpshooter  [Member]
9/1/2009 8:54:21 AM
Douglas MacArthur
John J. Pershing
Matthew Ridgeway
Smedley Butler
Joe Stilwell
George Patton
William T Sherman
Robert E. Lee
Andrew Jackson
Chesty Puller

That Gentlemen is the 10 greatest generals we have ever spawned in this country.







BushBoar  [Team Member]
9/1/2009 9:01:08 AM
Originally Posted By SecurityPolice:
What are your top 10 U.S. Generals (or Admirals) in US History? And Yes, Confederate Generals count at American Generals.

1) Gen. George S Patton
2) Gen. Stonewall Jackson
3) Gen. Robert E. Lee
4) Gen. George Washington
5) Admiral Chester Nimtz
6) Gen. Omar Bradley
7) Gen. Douglas MacArthur
8) Gen William Sherman
9) Gen. Ulysses S. Grant
10) Gen. Dwight Eisenhower

So what are your list of top 10 US Generals and why?

Thanks,


Jackson and Lee were fine generals, but it's a tough sell to include them in that list, as their most famous actions were fighting against the United States.
rm1bow  [Team Member]
9/1/2009 10:31:45 AM
Here's my list of Top 10 U.S. Generals. I always put Robert E. Lee first just because he is my
favorite, but they were all great.
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––-

Robert E. Lee
George Washington
Dwight D. Eisenhower
George Patton
Douglas Mac Arthur
Thomas 'Stonewall' Jackson
Ulysses S. Grant
John Pershing
George Marshall
Omar Bradley
4v50  [Team Member]
9/5/2009 11:29:57 AM
Henry Bouquet - Secured the opening of the frontier and made the westward expansion possible. OK, he was a Switzer and a British general in America. Honorable Mention.

Washington - he held the army together despite all its defeats.
Nathaniel Greene - never won a battle, but he did win a crucial campaign.
Daniel Morgan - Took a bad situation with some very unreliable militia and used all his disadvantages to his advantage to defeat a superior force (Cowpens).
Grant - best strategist of the Civil War. Captured three Corn-fed (or non-fed enemy) armies.
Marsh Bob - had some stunning victories like Chancellorsville and the Seven Days Battles (which relieved Richmond even though Malvern Hill was a fiasco)
Nathan Bedford Forrest - for a man unschooled in war, he was a natural leader and a gifted fighter. Lost only one battle. I think he would have ran circles around Stuart. Credited with coining the term, Fustest with the mostest that Patton later cited.
George Patton - Taught the Germans how to retreat (or crumble). Our best battlefield commander of WW II.
Curtis LeMay - OK, Army Air Corps general whose strategic air bombing campaign wasn't successful in Europe, but he did firebomb Japan which was immensely successful. One of the founding fathers of the US Airforce.
Chester Nimitz - took a ravaged Pacific Fleet and with his remaining submarine forces, decimated the Japanese Merchant Marine. Over 90% of its ships were sunk, effectively starving and strangling Japan. Led his outnumbered carrier forces and smashed the core of the Japanese carrier fleet, avenging the loss at Pearl Harbor.
William Halsey - one of Nimitiz's sword, he was a true, fighting admiral who but for the war, would have slipped into obscurity. A fierce warrior, he was also a very humble man. Two junior officers cut into the gee-dunk line ahead of all the enlisted sailors. A voice called out, "Hey you S-O-Bs! Get in the back. Outraged, the two officers stepped out of line and demanded for the sailor to identify himself. Out stepped Halsey who was waiting patiently in line with the rest of the sailors. When told that Japan had signed an armistice and asked about incoming Kamikazes who may approach the fleet, he advised, "Shoot them down in a friendly fashion." Little wonder the men loved Admiral "bulldog" Halsey.



Dishonorable Mention - Hiram Berdan. The Union's own Sir Robin of the Civil War.
XM_177  [Member]
9/7/2009 6:11:51 PM
This thread probably needs qualifiers. There's a big difference between generals that performed well at the "operational level" of war, vice those that did great at the "strategic level" of war.

Case in point, Gen Lee was amazing at the operational level, but failed terribly at the strategic level. On the other side of the coin, Eisenhower was never proven at the operational level (though Operation Torch almost qualifies), but he was a master at the strategic level. In my opinion, few, if any US generals, master both levels of war.

Here's my short list at the operational level of war:

1. Patton
2. Lee
3. Sherman

Strategic level:

1. Washington
2. Eisenhower
3. Grant
Sylvan  [Life Member]
9/9/2009 12:28:56 AM
MacArthur
Patton
Jackson
Longstreet
Sherman
Pershing
Washington (Greatest American ever, but not her best General)
Wainwright
Marshall
Scott

I know the love affair with Bradley stems from the movie Patton (based upon Bradley's autobiography, naturally), but everything he touched was cluster fuck. Cobra was his brain child.
Eisenhower was a miserable failure as a combat commander, but a consummate politician, for which he is remembered and beloved. he alone is responsible for the ETO going on as long as it did.
XM_177  [Member]
9/10/2009 7:52:11 PM
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
MacArthur
Patton
Jackson
Longstreet
Sherman
Pershing
Washington (Greatest American ever, but not her best General)
Wainwright
Marshall
Scott

I know the love affair with Bradley stems from the movie Patton (based upon Bradley's autobiography, naturally), but everything he touched was cluster fuck. Cobra was his brain child.
Eisenhower was a miserable failure as a combat commander, but a consummate politician, for which he is remembered and beloved. he alone is responsible for the ETO going on as long as it did.


Concur with your assessment on Bradley, but you underestimate Eisenhower and the value of politics in securing and maintaining an alliance.

Pegasus6  [Member]
9/13/2009 12:26:03 AM
If we finish in Iraq, I think History will be very favorable to General Petraeus.
Sylvan  [Life Member]
9/13/2009 2:03:44 PM
Originally Posted By Pegasus6:
If we finish in Iraq, I think History will be very favorable to General Petraeus.


Nope,
he gets saddled with Afghanistan, too.
Plus
beating up an insurgency isn't a test of generalship, its a test of political will and simple study.
There was no brilliance in what we have done.
moc51ar  [Member]
9/13/2009 2:09:43 PM
Stonewall
Lee
Beuregard
Pickett
Washington
Forrest
Patton
Pagonis
Pershing
Puller
Max_Power  [Life Member]
9/13/2009 2:27:21 PM
They always forget Lieutenant General Claire Lee Chenault.
Sylvan  [Life Member]
9/13/2009 5:23:34 PM
Originally Posted By Max_Power:
They always forget Lieutenant General Claire Lee Chenault.


Because he was one hell of a LTC.
He did nothing spectacularly as at the General officer level.
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