AR15.Com Archives
 What foreign language is most marketable?
mtnshooter  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:01:44 AM
I'm thinking Arabic or Farsi.... Though it would be easier to master Spanish ( I know the basics ).

Is Russian as marketable?
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HK_Shooter_03  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:01:59 AM
Chinese/Mandrin
Tango7  [Moderator]
4/26/2009 12:03:06 AM
The language of Hope Future Change ™ seemed to sell pretty well back in November... and even though millions bought it it's still foreign to me.
mtnshooter  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:03:40 AM
Originally Posted By Tango7:
The language of Hope Future Change ™ seemed to sell pretty well back in November... and even though millions bought it it's still foreign to me.


Good one.
mtnshooter  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:04:12 AM
Originally Posted By HK_Shooter_03:
Chinese/Mandrin


Would Chinese be harder or easier than Arabic?
ColonelHurtz  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:04:29 AM
Latin.
Cognomen  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:09:12 AM

Originally Posted By mtnshooter:
Originally Posted By HK_Shooter_03:
Chinese/Mandrin


Would Chinese be harder or easier than Arabic?

Harder. Russian is always marketable.

Thom101  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:10:52 AM
Originally Posted By HK_Shooter_03:
Chinese/Mandrin


They'll own us soon so I vote this

I speak Russian and no one gives a shit, employment wise
azmjs  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:11:24 AM
Originally Posted By mtnshooter:
Originally Posted By HK_Shooter_03:
Chinese/Mandrin


Would Chinese be harder or easier than Arabic?


Chinese has a written system that takes many years to become proficient with, and there is a large hurdle of pronunciation when you first begin, but the grammar is very simple and the syntax is reasonably similar to English.

Arabic has an alphabet so it's much easier to learn to read and write, but the grammar is more complicated.

Neither language is related to English, so they're both quite difficult. If you're willing to put the hard work in, you could learn either one.

Farsi is related to English, so that makes it a bit easier.

I'd try to learn a bit of the 3, and see if one strikes you as the most interesting.

It also depends a lot on what you want to do with it.

mtnshooter  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:13:12 AM
Originally Posted By azmjs:
Originally Posted By mtnshooter:
Originally Posted By HK_Shooter_03:
Chinese/Mandrin


Would Chinese be harder or easier than Arabic?


Chinese has a written system that takes many years to become proficient with, and there is a large hurdle of pronunciation when you first begin, but the grammar is very simple and the syntax is reasonably similar to English.

Arabic has an alphabet so it's much easier to learn to read and write, but the grammar is more complicated.

Neither language is related to English, so they're both quite difficult. If you're willing to put the hard work in, you could learn either one.

Farsi is related to English, so that makes it a bit easier.

I'd try to learn a bit of the 3, and see if one strikes you as the most interesting.

It also depends a lot on what you want to do with it.



Great advice, thanks.

I'd like it to help me get a job in academia.
The_Alchemist  [Member]
4/26/2009 12:14:01 AM
Originally Posted By HK_Shooter_03:
Chinese/Mandrin


That's what I thought. I spent four years learning Mandarin and became highly proficient in college, did the study abroad and everything. All I ever heard from people was "oh you'll have no problem getting an awesome job after graduation." Well, turns out no one gave a shit and I do not use my language in my current job, even though it involves international business between Taiwan and the US. I certainly wouldn't discourage learning Mandarin though.
modus  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:19:06 AM
Arabic if you want to work for feds or AMACO. Going to be a perpetual war until we get serious.

Mandarin if you want to be in international business or import - export with China.

Personally - I'd learn the language of love, French to get the chicks - very profitable.
azmjs  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:21:47 AM
Originally Posted By mtnshooter:
Originally Posted By azmjs:
Originally Posted By mtnshooter:
Originally Posted By HK_Shooter_03:
Chinese/Mandrin


Would Chinese be harder or easier than Arabic?


Chinese has a written system that takes many years to become proficient with, and there is a large hurdle of pronunciation when you first begin, but the grammar is very simple and the syntax is reasonably similar to English.

Arabic has an alphabet so it's much easier to learn to read and write, but the grammar is more complicated.

Neither language is related to English, so they're both quite difficult. If you're willing to put the hard work in, you could learn either one.

Farsi is related to English, so that makes it a bit easier.

I'd try to learn a bit of the 3, and see if one strikes you as the most interesting.

It also depends a lot on what you want to do with it.



Great advice, thanks.

I'd like it to help me get a job in academia.


In that case, Chinese might be better, since there's so much new stuff happening in China that scholars in numerous fields will be interested in for quite a while, but also more difficult, since academic pursuits are reading-intensive, and Chinese is quite a chore to learn to read.

I imagine that just about anything helps in academia, if you are willing to specialize in whatever language you learn.
clement  [Member]
4/26/2009 12:23:15 AM
English.

Foreign language is all relative.
AJSully421  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:29:00 AM
depends on what you want to do...

spanish will let you communicate with 1/3 of the world geographically

Japanese and Mandarin Chinese will get you far.

Arabic will let you yell at the terrorist fuckers before you blow their heads off, other than that... worthless devil speak.

the rest will be speaking english, spanish, chinese, or arabic in 20 years.
beatjunglist  [Member]
4/26/2009 12:38:44 AM
Farsi/Persian is easier and in high demand. Arabic is a HARD language to master with all the varying dialects.
DangerJ  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:38:46 AM
I have enjoyed many benefits of being able to speak, read, and write Japanese.
mtnshooter  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:39:40 AM
Originally Posted By AJSully421:
depends on what you want to do...

spanish will let you communicate with 1/3 of the world geographically

Japanese and Mandarin Chinese will get you far.

Arabic will let you yell at the terrorist fuckers before you blow their heads off, other than that... worthless devil speak.

the rest will be speaking english, spanish, chinese, or arabic in 20 years.


Good points, I think I'll focus on mastering Spanish the next year, then consider learning Farsi or Arabic thereafter.

My Liberal Arts degree is just about useless as a civilian (which I will always remain) unless I add more skills.

My thanks to all for inputting.
ttushooter  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:40:34 AM
if you work in a customer service type job with all the clients here in the US spanish is what i would guess they pay spanish bilingual folks at my job extra.
aplehr  [Member]
4/26/2009 12:44:40 AM
it depends if you want to work here or abroad. if you want to work in the US, spanish is definitely the most marketable. chinese isn't a very marketable language for domestic employment. if it was, every chinese college student would get a job as soon as they arrived here. they already know english and chinese and they're only 18-22 years old - but who would hire them just because they know chinese? chinese and arabic are niche languages - academia, government work and finance. it will take many, many, years to learn the 20,000+ kanji characters. i wish you luck, i'm thinking about becoming a career college student myself.
Raingod  [Member]
4/26/2009 12:44:57 AM
Originally Posted By mtnshooter:
Great advice, thanks.

I'd like it to help me get a job in academia.


Well, in that case, forget Chinese, because there is simply no way you'll become proficient enough at it to do anything serious in academia. It's too easy to hire a well-spoken immigrant for teaching basic language courses. Research, maybe, if you wanted to go whole hog and screw around with 3000-year-old manuscripts, but how many jobs are available for that?

Farsi would be useful for government work, especially in intel or the military, but how many colleges do anything with it?

For academia, I'd suggest your basic European languages. French, German, Spanish, maybe Italian and/or Russian.
BusMaster007  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:47:30 AM
If it's acedemia you want, how 'bout TEACHING English...?
garwj  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:48:06 AM
Instead of learning spanish, I'm thinking French, seems natural in case I have to give up.
Escotch  [Member]
4/26/2009 12:48:12 AM
I work for a consulting company and we won't look at hiring anyone (after a round of layoffs) unless they speak Spanish or maybe Mandarin, but we just opened an office in Singapore so we are looking there first of course. We usually lose out on Spanish speakers as they are in top demand usually.

mtnshooter  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:50:11 AM
Originally Posted By aplehr:
it depends if you want to work here or abroad. if you want to work in the US, spanish is definitely the most marketable. chinese isn't a very marketable language for domestic employment. if it was, every chinese college student would get a job as soon as they arrived here. they already know english and chinses and they're only 18-22 years old - but who would hire them just because they know chinese? chinese and arabic are niche languages - academia, government work and finance. it will take many, many, years to learn the 20,000+ kanji characters. i wish you luck, i'm thinking about becoming a career college student myself.


It would be much easier being a career college student if there weren't limits on the amount of loans! LOL.

WinstonSmith  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 12:51:57 AM
Just to put a little spin on things, maybe you would do better to base your choice on the culture you would be most comfortable in.

Then go learn German and go to work for the auto industry or in pharm.

German's friggin easy.
warlord  [Member]
4/26/2009 12:59:06 AM
Depends on what you want to do. If you want high tech stuff I would go with Chinese/Manderin. For low tech such as working in contruction firms, Spanish. Spanish is the most practical because mnay people speak Spanish.
Brazos_Jack  [Member]
4/26/2009 5:28:04 AM
Any language is marketable somewhere to some extent.

English is the global "language Franca" and probably will remain so. Any educated foreigner who pretends not to speak it is probably lying.

In the Western hemisphere, Spanish is the language spoken most by those who do not speak English.

In the Eastern Hemisphere, French is the language spoken most by those who do not or will not speak English.

Otherwise marketable languages will be location and industry specific.
swede1986  [Member]
4/26/2009 5:37:56 AM
Swedish. It's the global language of the future.


Frost7  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 5:41:24 AM
Depends on what you're doing. If you're into high tech and business, you can't go wrong with English, German, and Russian. And you've already got one of those down.
vito113  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 7:21:19 AM
Originally Posted By swede1986:
Swedish. It's the global language of the future.




Bürdi! ürdi, bürdi…





dewoitine  [Member]
4/26/2009 7:41:34 AM
Ebo.... hum well no nevermind

hoosier122  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 8:28:43 AM
Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:
Just to put a little spin on things, maybe you would do better to base your choice on the culture you would be most comfortable in.

Then go learn German and go to work for the auto industry or in pharm.

German's friggin easy.


Almost 40% of German vocabulary is recognizable to a native English speaker...

Sentence structure is very strict. Structure is basically the same as English with the exception of verb position...verb is ALWAYS in "2nd" position and "last" position.
QUIB  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 8:31:42 AM
Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:
Just to put a little spin on things, maybe you would do better to base your choice on the culture you would be most comfortable in.

Then go learn German and go to work for the auto industry or in pharm.

German's friggin easy.


All speaking German ever got me was:

- One job.
- One wife.
- But lots, and lots, of BEER!!!!!!!!!!!
BillSouthCarolina  [Member]
4/26/2009 9:04:03 AM
Originally Posted By swede1986:
Swedish. It's the global language of the future.




Nej talar Svenska
Tomtbo  [Life Member]
4/26/2009 9:13:29 AM
Originally Posted By hoosier122:
Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:
Just to put a little spin on things, maybe you would do better to base your choice on the culture you would be most comfortable in.

Then go learn German and go to work for the auto industry or in pharm.

German's friggin easy.


Almost 40% of German vocabulary is recognizable to a native English speaker...

Sentence structure is very strict. Structure is basically the same as English with the exception of verb position...verb is ALWAYS in "2nd" position and "last" position.



But all of us went to kindergarten!

FreeFloater  [Member]
4/26/2009 9:15:21 AM
How about portuguese?




Does this pass CoC?
refurb  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 9:27:43 AM
Originally Posted By HK_Shooter_03:
Chinese/Mandrin


Not really. There are a metric shitload of native Mandarin speakers here in the US and a ton of people in China who can speak English better than the OP could ever learn Mandarin.

RF
hcook  [Member]
4/26/2009 9:35:47 AM
Originally Posted By mtnshooter:
I'm thinking Arabic or Farsi.... Though it would be easier to master Spanish ( I know the basics ).

Is Russian as marketable?


Arabic or Farsi if you want to work in the .mil / intel sector, Mandarin if you are a business person.
BillSouthCarolina  [Member]
4/26/2009 9:37:30 AM
Originally Posted By refurb:
Originally Posted By HK_Shooter_03:
Chinese/Mandrin


Not really. There are a metric shitload of native Mandarin speakers here in the US and a ton of people in China who can speak English better than the OP could ever learn Mandarin.

RF


It would give one an edge compared to other white non-manderin speakers in China though, folks tend to love it when you learn their lingo...
LynC2  [Member]
4/26/2009 9:42:25 AM
Originally Posted By swede1986:
Swedish. It's the global language of the future.





You guys must be building another fleet of dragon ships! (Note to self, no cruises in the vacation plans.)
RONINBUDO  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 9:50:28 AM
CHINESE AND JAPANESE IS GREAT FOR WORK

ARABIC IS GOOD IF YOU PLAN TO GO TO WAR

SPANISH YOU NEED IF YOU LIVE IN A AMERICA
sherrick13  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 9:54:53 AM
Since Jan 20th 2009........Swahili.
GarandM1  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 9:57:11 AM
Actually, English. Especially if you're from a foreign country.

More people speak English as a first or second language than any other language in the world. Even the Chinese are learning English.

Being fluent in any two of the six "international" languages –– English, French, Spanish, Russian, Arabic, and Chinese –– would be good, though.
Bob1984  [Team Member]
4/26/2009 9:58:02 AM
Originally Posted By sherrick13:
Since Jan 20th 2009........Swahili.






Mclovin5-0  [Member]
4/26/2009 10:00:06 AM
Arabic is much easier than Mandarin in my opinion, you'll find more relation to English. I took two semesters of Mandarin as an undergraduate and it just never clicked for me. There are different tonal pronunciations that some English speakers just physically can't get a handle on.
Paul  [Site Staff]
4/26/2009 10:13:44 AM
Depends on what industry but English is the international language of business. I teach at a university full of foreign students learning English as a second language to return to their nations to teach. Most of our students are Japanese with some Korean but we have them visiting from nearly everywhere.
Crimson_Trace  [Member]
4/26/2009 10:31:36 AM

One of my high-end neighbors was going on about sending their 5 year old to a spanish "immersion" school. Going on about the virtues.

I was silent. Then looked at her kind of blank and said.

"Seems like a lot of trouble to be able to communicate with your gardner and the guy at the taco shop. Because that's the only useful purpose for it."

Strangely enough, the conversation ended shortly after that.


-Z
Burklow  [Member]
4/26/2009 10:57:18 AM
I speak some French, but I've only had a single conversation with someone in maybe 3-4 years...in France on vacation nonetheless!

Spanish is useful, but many people are already English/Spanish bilingual. Many people I've talked to actually recommended Westerners learning Japanese or Chinese solely because of the current need for English native speaking interpreters for business. If you're interested in a gov't job, Farsi and Arabic are high in demand.
Colonel-Sanders  [Member]
4/26/2009 11:00:46 AM
I speak Mandarin and it is only useful if you are specialised in some area. For example if i knew about cars i could land a job tommorrow on $200 an hour translating auto manuals or if i knew about medicine i could translate research papers. But unfortunately i know fuck all specific about anything and im not worth anything to anyone. Just because you know how to make good conservation in another language means sweet fuck all. Dont think you are gonna get translating job with a finance firm just because you can speak the lingo if you dont even know what bell curve is in english or understand it because these people dont want to talk about rugby, beer and boobs.


My advice is get a specialisation in english and know something inside out and then worry about getting another language under your belt. If you are a numpty who speaks english you will be still be a numpty when you learn spanish, just a bilingual numpty with no real skills.
Colonel-Sanders  [Member]
4/26/2009 11:20:48 AM
Just adding on. If you want to find a niche language where you can earn some decent money i suggest you stay away from the big languages. Look at the emerging markets especially in Africa and potential warzones. These would be central asian nations like Turkmenistan and all the former soviet republics and also strong emerging markets would be sub-saharan nations in africa, north asia in places like Mongolia and North Korea also.



Suffice to say if you knew Burmese and the place opened up tomorrow you could literally name your price.
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