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 Getting knife or giving knife as gift...give a penny or get a penny?
texashark  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 9:57:39 AM
I recently received a knife as a gift, and the giver enclosed a penny. He said he'd always heard you gave a penny with the knife.

I gave a knife as a gift, and the receipient gave me a penny, claiming you always had to pay for a knife, even if only a penny.

I must have missed this custom growing up. Have ya'll heard of it, and which way does it go?
KwaiChangCaine  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 9:59:44 AM
I've heard something similar, but don't remember how it goes, so TAG!
cyclone  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:00:29 AM
Gift of a knife gets you the penny in return........I gave my father a knife for Christmas and he handed me a penny
toast  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:00:57 AM
The recipient gives a penny. That way it is a sale and doesn't "cut the bond of friendship." I always thought it was crap.
nightstalker  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:01:06 AM
I was criticized for giving some knives as a wedding present.
338winmag  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:01:07 AM
More superstitious shit.

How do you feel about black cats crossing your path?
cyclone  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:01:50 AM
If they get in the way, they get run over..........then who has the bad luck?



Originally Posted By 338winmag:
More superstitious shit.

How do you feel about black cats crossing your path?
SOC  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:02:09 AM
He got it a little backwards.

Send him a note and the penny letting him know.
Old_Painless  [Life Member]
3/4/2008 10:03:55 AM
It was a common custom with Cajun people in Lousiana.

I was told that giving away a knife to someone would "cut" their love for the giver.

So, they always "sold" you a knife.

My Dad "sold" me several knives in my life. He would come up to me and say, "Give me a nickle". I would do so, and then he would hand me a new pocket knife.
chadban  [Member]
3/4/2008 10:10:39 AM
Same thing with shoes, or else the receiver will walk out of your life.
CharlieHo  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:15:11 AM

Originally Posted By nightstalker:
I was criticized for giving some knives as a wedding present.


What's the reasoning behind this?

I was considering knives as gifts to my wedding party (or whatever the heck you call the 3-4 dudes dressed up next to you )
Bumblebee_Bob  [Life Member]
3/4/2008 10:17:44 AM

Originally Posted By texashark:
I recently received a knife as a gift, and the giver enclosed a penny. He said he'd always heard you gave a penny with the knife.

I gave a knife as a gift, and the receipient gave me a penny, claiming you always had to pay for a knife, even if only a penny.

I must have missed this custom growing up. Have ya'll heard of it, and which way does it go?


You're not the only one's who's missed out.

I have never heard of this before today.
viktor  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:20:08 AM
That kind of thing is thick down here in south texas, I just roll with it.
mr_wilson  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:22:39 AM
There is a folk lore superstition regarding the giving of a knife as a gift.

If the knife is given to a friend, money must be exchanged as well. It is considered very bad luck to give someone a knife without exchanging money or the friendship will be cut by the knife. Because of this superstition, it is common that the gift of a knife will be given along with a penny, nickel or dime in the box with the knife so that the recipient can give back the coin, thereby saving the friendship from being severed by the giving of the sharp blade.

The exact background of this superstition is unclear yet, even today most people will include a coin with the gift of a knife and request the coin be given back. The apparent view is that it is far better to be safe than sorry.

mike

eta - more Knife superstitions

Stirring liquids or powders with a knife is often considered unlucky. One rhyme says, "Stir with a knife, stir up strife".

In some cultures giving a knife as a gift is considered a sign of respect and trust. This is especially true in Finland where various non-governmental organizations, clubs and even government agencies traditionally give a puukko (a Finnish fixed-blade hunting/outdoor knife) as a gift to trusted employers or contacts. The puukko is always presented handle first as a sign of trust and friendly intentions.

In many places in the United States it is considered bad luck to hand an open, folding blade knife to someone. This is especially true in more rural areas where carrying a pocket knife is as common as carrying a set of keys. This may stem from safety issues. It is also believed that allowing someone to close a folding blade knife that you have opened is bad luck.

Just as with swords, regional and cultural superstitions exist regarding the treatment of knives that are used in combat. One common superstition states that it is bad luck to return a combat knife from its sheath without using it to draw blood. A variant myth exists surrounding drawing a knife (e.g. a sgian dubh) without drawing the blood of a cultural enemy (e.g an Englishman). Sometimes these superstitions are actually attempts to insult the culture of the supposed believer.

Some cultures believe that a knife does not belong to an individual until it has 'bit' them, or tasted their blood. Believers in such superstitions may intentionally prick a finger on the blade of a knife rather than risk a later, accidental cut. According to this superstition, the knife will stay sharp longer and is less likely to accidentally cut its owner once it has tasted his or her blood.

In some parts of America, it is considered bad luck to sharpen a knife, or any blade, after dark.
BatcaveSouth  [Member]
3/4/2008 10:27:17 AM
There's another old knife custom called "dropping knives." Each person holds their closed fist out with a knife concealed. Their other hand is out palm up. Then they "drop" the knives in the other persons hand at the same time. Thats all I recall, but don't know the story behind it.
Redcap  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:31:22 AM


Retarded.
gonzo_beyondo  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:31:29 AM

Originally Posted By texashark:
I recently received a knife as a gift, and the giver enclosed a penny. He said he'd always heard you gave a penny with the knife.

I gave a knife as a gift, and the receipient gave me a penny, claiming you always had to pay for a knife, even if only a penny.

I must have missed this custom growing up. Have ya'll heard of it, and which way does it go?


Never, and I've been around the knife community for a damn long time.
CharlieHo  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:33:45 AM
I grew up playing mumbly-peg and nevr heard of most of these things...

Now closing a knife that someone else has opened, yes, I have heard of that one. But, I don't believe in bad luck...
Old_Painless  [Life Member]
3/4/2008 10:35:56 AM

Originally Posted By BatcaveSouth:
There's another old knife custom called "dropping knives." Each person holds their closed fist out with a knife concealed. Their other hand is out palm up. Then they "drop" the knives in the other persons hand at the same time. Thats all I recall, but don't know the story behind it.


It was a kind of "bet".

You were actually trading knives with your friend. You obviously hoped that the knife he dropped into your hand was a better knife than the one you dropped into his.
Admiral_Crunch  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:36:16 AM
I first heard about this when I got married. A few people gave us knives as wedding gifts, and a couple of the "old timers" had taped pennies to the packages. I asked my mom about it, and she told me that was how it was traditionally done. I'd never heard of it before.
joker1  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:40:30 AM
Yeah, I've done this (exchanged a penny for a knife) to avoid "severing the friendship". It was cute and only cost a penny to suggest you wouldn't do anything to harm a friendship.
BatcaveSouth  [Member]
3/4/2008 10:40:46 AM

Originally Posted By Old_Painless:

Originally Posted By BatcaveSouth:
There's another old knife custom called "dropping knives." Each person holds their closed fist out with a knife concealed. Their other hand is out palm up. Then they "drop" the knives in the other persons hand at the same time. Thats all I recall, but don't know the story behind it.


It was a kind of "bet".

You were actually trading knives with your friend. You oviously hoped that the knife he dropped into your hand was a better knife than the one you dropped into his.


Ok, thanks Painless.
wgjhsafT  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:43:22 AM
I was told the same thing...that you give the giver of the knife something so the relationship/friendship is not cut.

Learned it from a guy in Lake Charles, LA
john575  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:47:02 AM
Your supposed to give a coin not just a penny to the person who gave you the knife. A cool rare coin.
itsARanchrifle  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:50:48 AM
Wow. Never heard this before. I gave knives to the guys in my wedding. Don't talk to them now , so I guess it's true.
Admiral_Crunch  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:55:02 AM

Originally Posted By itsARanchrifle:
Wow. Never heard this before. I gave knives to the guys in my wedding. Don't talk to them now , so I guess it's true.


We received a chef's knife from a friend as a wedding gift, and we still hang out at least once a week, so I guess it's not true.
jmindler  [Member]
3/4/2008 10:56:16 AM
interestingly, the only two people who have ever given me knives as gifts are no longer in my life. No pennies or other currency were exchanged.
jmhat98  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:57:29 AM
They talk about this in the movie "The Edge"
AJE  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 10:58:37 AM
I heard of it a couple years ago at Christmas when I got some hunting knives.
campperrykid  [Member]
3/4/2008 11:03:55 AM
FWIW--- I first bumped into this in (what was then )West Germany, in the 1980's.
The Nato Allies German Hunting Course included it as a hunters' custom.
Lots of Germans went to Texas way bach when.... Goin' to (old) Braunfels was a trip for some of the guys from Texas.

Hope this helps.
sixgunsblazing  [Team Member]
3/4/2008 11:11:34 AM
Must be nice to always have people giving you money.