AR15.Com Archives
 Do spiders poop?
Johnny_Reno  [Team Member]
7/19/2007 10:10:59 PM
Just wondering.
Melvinator2k0  [Team Member]
7/19/2007 10:31:00 PM

Originally Posted By Torqued:
pottytrainingsolutions.com/shop/images/Everyone%20Poops%20Book.jpg

Holy crap apples poop?
Illysium  [Member]
7/19/2007 10:36:39 PM
Spiders feed by sucking the juice from other insects. The crap is usually white.

RockHard13F  [Team Member]
7/19/2007 10:38:06 PM

Originally Posted By Illysium:
Spiders feed by sucking the juice from other insects. The crap is usually white.

budak.blogs.com/the_annotated_budak/images/spider_red_1.jpg


Am I able to set up an IM to display that image upon it opening? I have a friend who would LOVE to see that.

-Ben
Torqued  [Team Member]
7/19/2007 10:39:37 PM

Originally Posted By Melvinator2k0:

Originally Posted By Torqued:
pottytrainingsolutions.com/shop/images/Everyone%20Poops%20Book.jpg

Holy crap apples poop?


Where do you think applesauce comes from?
Torqued  [Team Member]
7/19/2007 10:57:05 PM
CWO  [Team Member]
7/19/2007 11:19:29 PM
Yes. Small spots that are a thin liquid.
kill-9  [Team Member]
7/19/2007 11:26:26 PM

Originally Posted By Johnny_Reno:

Originally Posted By XDBACKUPGUN:
Yes

All animals excrete waste.




Spiders aren't animals.


Tras  [Team Member]
7/19/2007 11:46:05 PM
How do insects locomote? Do they have actual muscles?
MagKnightX  [Team Member]
7/20/2007 11:52:41 AM

Originally Posted By Tras:
How do insects locomote? Do they have actual muscles?


Yes, though their muscles are arranged rather differently than ours. Every animal above the level of a sponge has muscle, including jellyfish.

Most insects move in an alternating-triangle pattern of their six legs, three legs down on each "step," though several (especially those like mantises that only keep four legs on the ground) deviate from this pattern. I'm afraid that, other than that, I don't know much about arthropod locomotion, though I do know that anything with more legs than six is going to move differently.
CS223  [Team Member]
7/20/2007 12:04:57 PM
Spiders shit and oh my how they do. It's like bird shit and hell to get off of things. You won't normally notice it unless you have a shed or a place where they have taken up residency for a while. Another neat thing that some spiders do is roll up their web and and eat it so they can make new web. Not only that, they have to ability to make different kinds of silk as well and have multiple spinner glands in their abdomen that extrude the different silk. Pretty cool creatures when you you get to know them.
Shane333  [Team Member]
7/20/2007 12:05:35 PM

Originally Posted By azhammer:
THIS IS THE PERFECT THREAD!!!
i41.photobucket.com/albums/e281/azhammer/marr/grossspider4.jpg

............FOR ME TO POOP ON!


That's actually a pretty cute little jumping spider. They're one of the few spider types I can stand to have around. I'm ususally arachnaphobic, but for some reason the little jumping spiders don't bother me.
Morcoth  [Team Member]
7/20/2007 12:27:11 PM
Did I get here to late for TubArachnid?

Oh well, bug-scat is not one of the things I normaly google.

Morcoth
N_Viejo  [Member]
7/20/2007 12:28:59 PM

Originally Posted By MagKnightX:

Originally Posted By Tras:
How do insects locomote? Do they have actual muscles?


Yes, though their muscles are arranged rather differently than ours. Every animal above the level of a sponge has muscle, including jellyfish.

Most insects move in an alternating-triangle pattern of their six legs, three legs down on each "step," though several (especially those like mantises that only keep four legs on the ground) deviate from this pattern. I'm afraid that, other than that, I don't know much about arthropod locomotion, though I do know that anything with more legs than six is going to move differently.


I think that they move using hydro pressure like a hydraulic system. They have hydraulic fluid that is pumped into their legs to stiffen them. By controlling where and how the fluid is pumped, they move their legs. That is why when a spider dies, it curls up in a ball--no more hydraulic pressure to keep their legs extended.
Torf  [Member]
7/20/2007 12:38:26 PM

Originally Posted By Johnny_Reno:

Originally Posted By XDBACKUPGUN:
Yes

All animals excrete waste.




Spiders aren't animals.


1. Most people my age have been educated from early on, that there are several Kingdoms. Which of the following Kingdom's do they fall into?

a) Protista
b) Plantae
c) Animalia
d) Fungi

Answer: __________





ETA: Interesting article on Kingdoms
Rocksarge  [Team Member]
7/20/2007 12:56:42 PM
are those like Iraqnids?
Shane333  [Team Member]
7/20/2007 1:01:14 PM

Originally Posted By N_Viejo:

Originally Posted By MagKnightX:

Originally Posted By Tras:
How do insects locomote? Do they have actual muscles?


Yes, though their muscles are arranged rather differently than ours. Every animal above the level of a sponge has muscle, including jellyfish.

Most insects move in an alternating-triangle pattern of their six legs, three legs down on each "step," though several (especially those like mantises that only keep four legs on the ground) deviate from this pattern. I'm afraid that, other than that, I don't know much about arthropod locomotion, though I do know that anything with more legs than six is going to move differently.


I think that they move using hydro pressure like a hydraulic system. They have hydraulic fluid that is pumped into their legs to stiffen them. By controlling where and how the fluid is pumped, they move their legs. That is why when a spider dies, it curls up in a ball--no more hydraulic pressure to keep their legs extended.


I don't know about other spiders, but jumping spiders are able to jump so powerfully using hydraulic pressure.
akethan  [Team Member]
7/20/2007 1:23:28 PM
It's some nasty shit.