AR15.Com Archives
 Can the government call retired military personnel back to active duty?
Steve_T_M  [Member]
12/6/2006 8:41:18 AM
A reservist army E-7 told me that even if you retire, the military can call you back to active duty for certain a time period.

Sounds like BS to me, but has anyone ever heard this?
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thedave1164  [Member]
12/6/2006 8:43:34 AM

Originally Posted By Steve_T_M:
A reservist army E-7 told me that even if you retire, the military can call you back to active duty for certain a time period.

Sounds like BS to me, but has anyone ever heard this?


Yep,

If I did my 20 and retired, they would put me in the ready reserve and I would be eligible for call up for the next 10 years.

Now if I retired at 30 years, no, I would have completed all my time.
lippo  [Member]
12/6/2006 8:47:46 AM
Doesn't the contract say in envent of a National Emergency (war) they can call you back at any time for the rest of your life if your MOS is critically needed?
John_Wayne777  [Team Member]
12/6/2006 8:49:38 AM

Originally Posted By Steve_T_M:
A reservist army E-7 told me that even if you retire, the military can call you back to active duty for certain a time period.

Sounds like BS to me, but has anyone ever heard this?


No, it isn't BS.

You can be recalled from retirement. If you are an officer, you can be recalled until something like age 60....
The_Reaper  [Team Member]
12/6/2006 8:49:45 AM
The government seems to do whatever it wants, whenever it wants.

thedave1164  [Member]
12/6/2006 8:54:33 AM

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:

Originally Posted By Steve_T_M:
A reservist army E-7 told me that even if you retire, the military can call you back to active duty for certain a time period.

Sounds like BS to me, but has anyone ever heard this?


No, it isn't BS.

You can be recalled from retirement. If you are an officer, you can be recalled until something like age 60....


Yes, Officers can be called back till age 60 or so, even if they didn't retire. An Officer must RESIGN their commission, not just be discharged from active duty, in order to not be recalled.

I laugh at all the JO's that got off active duty and didn't resign, getting called back and complaining about how they had served their time, blah, blah, blah. But they didn't resign their commission. Ha, I was enlisted and even knew that.
stefbo  [Member]
12/6/2006 8:56:08 AM
Also, you may hear about 2,3,4,6 year enlistments. The fine print is that ALL enlistments are acctually for 8 years, the remainder of what you do not do actively is converted to time in the IRR where you are subject for recall. If you are an officer and get out of the military you are subject for recall unless you specifically and in writing resign your commision.
lippo  [Member]
12/6/2006 9:00:49 AM
I was in the Army Reserve when Iraq invaded Kuwait and I thought I was going for sure. I have no idea why I didn't end up over there. My dad was a retired Colonel at the time and he was saying if they called me up, he'd come out of retirement and volunteer to go over there too. He'd already served in World War 2 and spent 37 years in the Army at that point. He'd been retired for 10 years. He never resigned his commission.

I told him it was my turn if they activated me and he was to watch over my family if something happened to me. Imagine a son (Sgt) being very firm with his career Army officer dad. He knew what I was talking about and said ok, he understood. He was 65 years old at the time. My dad was a true patriot warrior his whole life.

And yes, if you don't resign, you are an officer for life.
WayneG  [Team Member]
12/6/2006 9:07:08 AM
Yup, I just retired last August, and it clearly states in my retirement paperwork that I am subject to recall to active duty until age 60. One of the perks of being a Commissioned Officer .
Aimless  [Site Staff]
12/6/2006 9:08:00 AM

Originally Posted By thedave1164:


Yes, Officers can be called back till age 60 or so, even if they didn't retire. An Officer must RESIGN their commission, not just be discharged from active duty, in order to not be recalled.

I laugh at all the JO's that got off active duty and didn't resign, getting called back and complaining about how they had served their time, blah, blah, blah. But they didn't resign their commission. Ha, I was enlisted and even knew that.


Why would an officer not resign his commission?
stefbo  [Member]
12/6/2006 9:09:41 AM
Why would he resign his commision?
cmjohnson  [Team Member]
12/6/2006 9:13:57 AM
To avoid any chance of being recalled.

Of course, by resigning your commission, you also give up ALL residual benefits.


I view resigning your commission in order to avoid a possible recall to be a very dishonorable thing to do.


CJ
Dave_A  [Team Member]
12/6/2006 9:15:04 AM

Originally Posted By Aimless:

Originally Posted By thedave1164:


Yes, Officers can be called back till age 60 or so, even if they didn't retire. An Officer must RESIGN their commission, not just be discharged from active duty, in order to not be recalled.

I laugh at all the JO's that got off active duty and didn't resign, getting called back and complaining about how they had served their time, blah, blah, blah. But they didn't resign their commission. Ha, I was enlisted and even knew that.


Why would an officer not resign his commission?


In the case of the pay-off-my-ROTC-scholorship-and-out types, because they don't know they need to...

The rest who know and don't generally don't want to...
Aimless  [Site Staff]
12/6/2006 9:38:15 AM

Originally Posted By Dave_A:

Originally Posted By Aimless:

Originally Posted By thedave1164:


Yes, Officers can be called back till age 60 or so, even if they didn't retire. An Officer must RESIGN their commission, not just be discharged from active duty, in order to not be recalled.

I laugh at all the JO's that got off active duty and didn't resign, getting called back and complaining about how they had served their time, blah, blah, blah. But they didn't resign their commission. Ha, I was enlisted and even knew that.


Why would an officer not resign his commission?


In the case of the pay-off-my-ROTC-scholorship-and-out types, because they don't know they need to...

The rest who know and don't generally don't want to...


Oh I didn't mean in the "Whether to get out of serving again v. wanting to serve again" way. I mean do you lose any benefits by resigning your commission?
WinterBorn  [Member]
12/6/2006 9:44:48 AM
As stated above, you lose ALL your benefits...
Steve_T_M  [Member]
12/6/2006 9:58:03 AM
Is this just for officers, or can enlisted person who retires with fewer than 30 years can also be recalled?

Then an enlisted person who does not retire and who completes the 8 year IRR requirement cannot be recalled, correct?
thedave1164  [Member]
12/6/2006 9:58:09 AM
I actually know of 2 Officers that are resigning their commissions due to call ups.

One has served in a reserve capacity for 28 years, and very nearly lost everything when he was called up for a year in Iraq, and at the same time his wife was laid off from her job.

The second was an Officer in the reserves, after a fairly long active duty stint, a real deal snake eater type, he has spent a solid year in far away places, and since has been called up regularly for a week adventure here, 2 weeks there, etc.... His wife told him that he has done quite enough and it was time. I know he was weary, but I know if it was just him, he would have kept going.

Don't paint thos ethat resign their commission with the same broad brush.

I think all men should serve their country, but not all are cut out for a lifetime in the military, I wasn't, I tried.....
thedave1164  [Member]
12/6/2006 10:01:45 AM

Originally Posted By Steve_T_M:
Is this just for officers, or can enlisted person who retires with fewer than 30 years can also be recalled?

Then an enlisted person who does not retire and who completes the 8 year IRR requirement cannot be recalled, correct?


Before 1984 or so, your inital enlistment contract was for 6 years, after that it became 8 years.

You are eligible for recall if it is less than 8 years from your inital enlistment date, or if you have less than 30 years from your inital enlistment and retired.
LWilde  [Team Member]
12/6/2006 10:07:33 AM
Yes, Uncle Sugar can and has recalled retired servicemembers to active duty. Just about the only thing preventing a member from being recalled might be if he/she were Not Physically Qualified or NPQ...and even then waivers might granted.
EOD_Guy  [Team Member]
12/6/2006 1:57:00 PM
During the first Gulf war, I was asked to volunteer for 179 days of active duty. The Army would have used me and other retirees to perform some of the duties of active Army EOD units in the States that were to be deployed. I had been retired for 6 years at the time.

The Army has also offered active duty to retirees for casualty assistance assignments.
ASNixon  [Member]
12/6/2006 1:59:54 PM
You betcha - they did for Gulf War I when they activated the Battleships Wisconsin and Missouri. They needed gunners mates (and others) to help train with the turret guns.
OODALOOP  [Member]
12/6/2006 2:07:19 PM
Yes,

You don't actually draw "retirement" pay but "retainer" pay. That's why it stops when you die as they can no longer call you back.

In the Marine Corps we are transferred to the Fleet Marine Corps Reserve.

Part of the deal.

We have very few called back involuntarily for GWOT as they advertise for the billets and most are filled by volunteers. Normally billets are at the bases and stations stateside to keep things going while unit staff members are deployed forward.
webtaz99  [Team Member]
12/6/2006 2:08:27 PM
Can the government call retired military personnel back to active duty?

Maybe, if they pass a new weapons ban and grant amnesty.
SmilingBandit  [Team Member]
12/6/2006 2:09:40 PM

Originally Posted By The_Reaper:
The government seems to do whatever it wants, whenever it wants.



And it's in the contract too. The bastards.
markmars  [Member]
12/6/2006 2:19:24 PM
According to Department of Defense (DOD) Directive 1352.1:

Involuntary Order to Active Duty. The Secretary of a Military Department may order any retired Regular member, retired Reserve member who has completed at least 20 years of active military service, or a member of the Fleet Reserve or Fleet Marine Corps Reserve to active duty without the member's consent at any time to perform duties deemed necessary in the interests of national defense in accordance with 10 U.S.C. 683 (reference (b)). This includes the authority to order a retired member who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) to active duty to facilitate the exercise of court-martial jurisdiction under Section 302(a) of reference (b). A retired member may not be involuntarily ordered to active duty solely for obtaining court-martial jurisdiction over the member.

Link:www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/d13521_071605/d13521p.pdf

After you turn 60 the odds go down that you will be called up, but there has been a few case were Doctors in their early 60’s were activated.
thedave1164  [Member]
12/6/2006 2:23:39 PM

Originally Posted By markmars:
According to Department of Defense (DOD) Directive 1352.1:

Involuntary Order to Active Duty. The Secretary of a Military Department may order any retired Regular member, retired Reserve member who has completed at least 20 years of active military service, or a member of the Fleet Reserve or Fleet Marine Corps Reserve to active duty without the member's consent at any time to perform duties deemed necessary in the interests of national defense in accordance with 10 U.S.C. 683 (reference (b)). This includes the authority to order a retired member who is subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) to active duty to facilitate the exercise of court-martial jurisdiction under Section 302(a) of reference (b). A retired member may not be involuntarily ordered to active duty solely for obtaining court-martial jurisdiction over the member.

Link:www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/d13521_071605/d13521p.pdf

After you turn 60 the odds go down that you will be called up, but there has been a few case were Doctors in their early 60’s were activated.


Doctors are Officers, so they would have to resign.
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