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 Stamped or milled SIG
Epsilon  [Member]
11/21/2004 1:14:22 PM
Do SIGs newer milled slides offer any advantage compared to the stamped slides?
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Waldo  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 1:15:51 PM

Well there isn't any roll pin to break. (not that I've ever had that happen)
cyanide  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 1:18:40 PM
none what so ever
warlord  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 1:40:39 PM

Originally Posted By Waldo:
Well there isn't any roll pin to break. (not that I've ever had that happen)


Ditto, regarding the roll-pin. That silly little pin holding the breach block in place is not just an ordinary, plain old everyday old roll pin, it is very special one. My old now-closed indoor range had a 226 as rental gun, and it broke that pin several times, and back then it took an act of congress to get another one from Sig. Anyways the owner decided to replace the hollow pin with a solid one by sending it to a local gunsmith, and it caused the slide to crack, and was retired. Sorry, can't provide a number of rounds shot count, but it was a tremendous amount. Apparently that hollow pin provides some kind of cushioning for the slide.

Contrast that to the Glocks, the Glocks were pretty reliable, it didn't break the slide until 500,000 rounds!And was replaced. When the range closed, it had 750,000 official rounds on the clock, because people often smuggle in ammo from Wall-Marts etc, so the rounds shot is probably higher.

My friend shot a 228 with the milled SS slide rather than the sheet metal one, according to him the milled slide is not as accurate as the folded sheet metal one.
SPECTRE  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 1:45:54 PM
I prefer the stamped/folded sheet steel slides over the newer milled version.
226, 228, 220 it's all good !!
50cal  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 1:49:57 PM
I have 2- P226's with stamped slides and 1-P229 with milled slide. The only difference I can tell is the weight.
ARDOC  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 1:52:47 PM
No difference. I think the sheet metal ones will last as long as the milled ones under normal conditions that we would put the gun through. I think the aluminum frame would fail first. The pin can be purchased from their Sig Shop and some of the guys at Sigforum.com. I think they also weight less then the milled slides.
SPECTRE  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 1:59:42 PM
The roll pins (two together) are simply a maintenence issue like certain parts on any gun.
Change them when needed (which isn't very often) and keep on shooting.
ByteTheBullet  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 2:02:11 PM
Can someone post pics/links of the different slides? I would look it up, but I am not sure what to look up.


Thanks,
ByteTheBullet (-:
Epsilon  [Member]
11/21/2004 2:35:53 PM

Can someone post pics/links of the different slides? I would look it up, but I am not sure what to look up.


Heres the newer slide. Notice you can see the extractor.




Heres the older slide.


AZ-K9  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 2:39:17 PM
How old are the stamped steel slides? I just traded in a Sig that was made in 92, and I could swear it was the "newer" slide....
Epsilon  [Member]
11/21/2004 2:42:34 PM
I could be wrong. But thats what someone told me. For the newer slides you can see the extractor and for the older ones you cant. But I noticed that SIGs above the caliber of 9mm have visible extractors.....so im not sure anymore.

Okay the newer SIG P226s in 9mm have a visible extractor...not sure about the other calibers.
Lumpy196  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 2:48:30 PM

Originally Posted By Epsilon:
I could be wrong. But thats what someone told me. For the newer slides you can see the extractor and for the older ones you cant. But I noticed that SIGs above the caliber of 9mm have visible extractors.....so im not sure anymore.

Okay the newer SIG P226s in 9mm have a visible extractor...not sure about the other calibers.




Ive never seen a stamped slide SIG in ANY caliber with an external extractor.
Epsilon  [Member]
11/21/2004 2:50:53 PM

Ive never seen a stamped slide SIG in ANY caliber with an external extractor.


Okay thanks.

So I was right? All the newer SIG have an external extractor and the older ones have an internal?
Lumpy196  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 2:57:48 PM

Originally Posted By Epsilon:

Ive never seen a stamped slide SIG in ANY caliber with an external extractor.


Okay thanks.

So I was right? All the newer SIG have an external extractor and the older ones have an internal?



Stamped = internal
Milled = external
SJSAMPLE  [Member]
11/21/2004 3:10:28 PM

Originally Posted By cyanide:
none what so ever



1. The older, rolled steel slides are VERY prone to rust wherever the surface treatment wears thin (muzzle). The newer (stainless) slides aren't.
2. The milled slides are much stronger than the older slides. Thicker and heavery, yes. But stronger, still.
3. The milled slides vary much less in tolerance. That's why you can purchase an unfitted barrel from Bar-Sto and DROP IT IN. Very easy to convert to another caliber. When you pin in the breech block, you get varying dimensions that require fitting of a new barrel.

My 1990 P226 (rolled steel) has over 45,000 and is still going strong. But there are definite benefits to the newer slides.
ByteTheBullet  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 3:44:14 PM

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:

Originally Posted By Epsilon:

Ive never seen a stamped slide SIG in ANY caliber with an external extractor.


Okay thanks.

So I was right? All the newer SIG have an external extractor and the older ones have an internal?



Stamped = internal
Milled = external



I know machinist's terms...are you saying that the slides are 'stamped' out of sheet/plate steel? Or is there a part in the slide that is stamped? Sorry for the stupidity.


ByteTheBullet (-:
Lumpy196  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 3:48:39 PM
Yes, SIG stamped (I think they prefer the term "rolled") them out of sheet metal and then welded the ends on them, and pinned in a machined breech block/firing pin housing.

ByteTheBullet  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 3:57:41 PM

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
Yes, SIG stamped (I think they prefer the term "rolled") them out of sheet metal and then welded the ends on them, and pinned in a machined breech block/firing pin housing.




Wow, I did not know that. Thanks!


ByteTheBullet (-:
cyanide  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 4:00:05 PM

Originally Posted By SJSAMPLE:

Originally Posted By cyanide:
none what so ever



1. The older, rolled steel slides are VERY prone to rust wherever the surface treatment wears thin (muzzle). The newer (stainless) slides aren't.Apples - oranges


2. The milled slides are much stronger than the older slides. Thicker and heavery, yes. But stronger, still. To what advantage ???


3. The milled slides vary much less in tolerance. That's why you can purchase an unfitted barrel from Bar-Sto and DROP IT IN. Very easy to convert to another caliber. When you pin in the breech block, you get varying dimensions that require fitting of a new barrel.don't buy any of that

My 1990 P226 (rolled steel) has over 45,000 and is still going strong. But there are definite benefits to the newer slides.



My comments in red
50cal  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 4:00:46 PM
If you ever see an older slide in the white, you can see the weld line where the front bushing was TIG'ed in.
SJSAMPLE  [Member]
11/21/2004 6:15:49 PM

Originally Posted By cyanide:

Originally Posted By SJSAMPLE:

Originally Posted By cyanide:
none what so ever



1. The older, rolled steel slides are VERY prone to rust wherever the surface treatment wears thin (muzzle). The newer (stainless) slides aren't.Apples - oranges


2. The milled slides are much stronger than the older slides. Thicker and heavery, yes. But stronger, still. To what advantage ???


3. The milled slides vary much less in tolerance. That's why you can purchase an unfitted barrel from Bar-Sto and DROP IT IN. Very easy to convert to another caliber. When you pin in the breech block, you get varying dimensions that require fitting of a new barrel.don't buy any of that

My 1990 P226 (rolled steel) has over 45,000 and is still going strong. But there are definite benefits to the newer slides.



My comments in red



Apples to Oranges? He asked for a comparison. Stainless rusts less than rolled steel. Fact. That's one advantage. Having a stronger slide is an advantage (with the disadvantage of greater weight). With the new P226, you can fire 9mm, .40 and 357SIG out of the same frame and slide with a barrel conversion. And, it's a fact that you can buy a drop-in barrel for the milled slides. I did it with a Bar-Sto drop-in on my P229. When you machine from a solid billet, you can control the dimensions much better. You can have them fitted, too. But the accuracy advantage is minimal. Like it or not, those are ADVANTAGES.
ARDOC  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 6:27:24 PM
SIG went to the milled slides when they started to make 357 sigs. Then all their new guns now have the milled slide. The slides are also US made so they must have not wanted to duplicate they dies and tools for both. So they went to milled to save money. There are some advantages but not so great that a recreational shooter would notice.
SPECTRE  [Team Member]
11/21/2004 6:32:50 PM

Originally Posted By ARDOC:
SIG went to the milled slides when they started to make 357 sigs. Then all their new guns now have the milled slide. The slides are also US made so they must have not wanted to duplicate they dies and tools for both. So they went to milled to save money. There are some advantages but not so great that a recreational shooter would notice.



The 228, 220 and 225 and maybe one or two more still use the stamped/folded today.
That takes nothing away from the milled versions though. I just like the balance, look and feel of the stamped/folded SIGs better.
I really, REALLY like SIGs !!!
SSeric02  [Member]
11/21/2004 7:15:21 PM

SIG went to the milled slides when they started to make 357 sigs. Then all their new guns now have the milled slide. The slides are also US made so they must have not wanted to duplicate they dies and tools for both. So they went to milled to save money. There are some advantages but not so great that a recreational shooter would notice.


The P229 was the first Sig with a milled stainless steel slide. It was/is basically a "product improvement" of the P228 in .40 S&W. The milled stainless slide is thicker in profile and quite a bit heavier to tolorate the more powerful round. Sig later went on to alos offer the P229 in 9mm (odd since they still produce the P228 which is essentially similar, albeit lighter) and .357 Sig. Late, when the success of the .40 S&W was eveident, Sig marketed the P226 in .40 S&W. These .40 S&W P226s had milled stainless slides, BUT the 9mm P226s still had the stamped/rolled slides until a few years ago. Now, all P226s have the milled slides.


The 228, 220 and 225 and maybe one or two more still use the stamped/folded today.
That takes nothing away from the milled versions though. I just like the balance, look and feel of the stamped/folded SIGs better.



This is correct.


I really, REALLY like SIGs !!!


Me too!!!
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