AR15.Com Archives
 Seam sealing an aluminum boat...... and outboard/small eng repair
Garand_Shooter  [Team Member]
4/15/2003 6:31:07 AM EST
I have an old aluminum boat that has some slow leaks on the seams and I want to seal them up, as well as possibly seal around the rivits. Anyone done this? Whats the best method? It's about 50 years old, and probably not worth the $$ it will take for me to get it back on the water, buts its been in the family so long I want to keep it up and pass it on. Also, I have an old 2cyl 6 HP johnson outboard, complete and working except the fuel pump is gone.... I can't find one for the older engines, and was considering just installing an electric pump with a regulater to get it going until I find the right one.... should I have any problems with this, and does anyone know where I can find a really small electric pump? Something made for samall gen sets or mowers would be ideal.
Paid Advertisement
--
Garand_Shooter  [Team Member]
4/15/2003 7:01:10 AM EST
disregard on the fuel pump...found one online!
The_Beer_Slayer  [Site Staff]
4/15/2003 7:16:38 AM EST
my dad had an old john boat that was the same way. After trying amost every silcone product out there we finally ended up coating the seams and rivets with j-b weld. Cost us about 100.00 worth but you couldnt tear that damn boat apart now if you had too. Leaks stopped. We also tried fiberglassing the bottom but had a problem getting the fiberglass to adhere for more than a month or so.
Wraith  [Team Member]
4/15/2003 7:37:21 AM EST
I have used a product called Gluvit with no problems. I have included the link below.(I hope) [url]www.marinetex.com/gluvit%20prod%20info.htm[/url]
Pangea  [Member]
4/15/2003 7:43:02 AM EST
Try bucking those rivets a little before you go any further. Hire a neighborhood kid to help since you probably don't have any friends. I usually drill the old rivets out and TIG weld the faying surfaces together if they wont reseal with a little bucking. Good luck.
Garand_Shooter  [Team Member]
4/15/2003 7:45:27 AM EST
[quote]Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer: my dad had an old john boat that was the same way. After trying amost every silcone product out there we finally ended up coating the seams and rivets with j-b weld. Cost us about 100.00 worth but you couldnt tear that damn boat apart now if you had too. Leaks stopped. We also tried fiberglassing the bottom but had a problem getting the fiberglass to adhere for more than a month or so.[/quote] Did you try any of that GE silicone sealant made for aluminum gutters? A friend reccomeneded it and it will be alot cheaper to try than JB weld!
TimJ  [Team Member]
4/15/2003 7:52:03 AM EST
[quote]Originally Posted By Wraith: I have used a product called Gluvit with no problems. I have included the link below.(I hope) [url]www.marinetex.com/gluvit%20prod%20info.htm[/url][/quote] Thanks Wraith, off to West Marine at lunch for some. I've got a leaky aluminum boat, too! Now if it will stay warm enough....
California_Kid  [Team Member]
4/15/2003 7:56:52 AM EST
I've used plain old clear silicone sealant on aluminum, fiberglass, and painted metal with great success. Haven't used it on an aluminum boat hull but it did a great job on my leaky aluminum awning. Even sealed a bullet hole with it. (Bullet was travelling DOWN.) It may not be as strong as JB Weld but it's a lot more flexible, which may matter in a boat. It sticks to glass really well too.
propguy  [Member]
4/15/2003 7:57:53 AM EST
JB Weld is some good stuff also 3M 5200 very strong surface prep IS A MUST good luck if ya ever boat around Cape Cod I'll take care of that leak with a little TIG weld[:)][ps bring your papers so they let ya leave the PR Of Ma.][:)]
Garand_Shooter  [Team Member]
4/15/2003 8:14:57 AM EST
I also thought of using that DIY rhino lining type stuff to do the inside, more to just give a surface to the floor.. that may help seal it a little also. It's not a bad enough leak to make me not go out, but its enough to be annoying.
The_Beer_Slayer  [Site Staff]
4/15/2003 9:07:43 AM EST
we tried about 5 differnt types of silicone. It would do as a temp fix but always pulled loose eventually. It makes a good filler or gasket but not good for a stressed area such as the keel or seems. Actually rhino liner on the outside of the hull might work well. Should fill in small openings and make a tough finish. As long as you aren't worried about speed or getting on a plane you should be fine. The rough finish will cause some extra drag in the water mike
BigDozer66  [Team Member]
4/15/2003 9:14:14 AM EST
I had a buddy who did the spray in bed liners and they tried to spray the inside of an alum boat...It did not stick well no matter how they prepped it. It also added a bunch of weight to it. Get you a 500 gpm bilge pump and a battery and just keep it pumped out...if you are going to keep it. Drilling them out and welding them is the best way to go. Always wear a PFD! BigDozer66
Hoplophile  [Team Member]
4/15/2003 10:01:49 AM EST
Solder or Tig weld them.
Gun-fan  [Team Member]
4/15/2003 10:20:30 AM EST
[img]http://www.lessthantv.com/i/THLE-12.jpg[/img]
propguy  [Member]
4/15/2003 10:24:35 AM EST
[quote]Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer: we tried about 5 differnt types of silicone. It would do as a temp fix but always pulled loose eventually. It makes a good filler or gasket but not good for a stressed area such as the keel or seems. Actually rhino liner on the outside of the hull might work well. Should fill in small openings and make a tough finish. As long as you aren't worried about speed or getting on a plane you should be fine. The rough finish will cause some extra drag in the water mike[/quote] Did you try the 5200 its for above and below the waterline it is some VERY STRONG STUFF If ya want just a patch you could also try aladdin 3-1 rod it can be applied with a propane torch [its solder]as far as the 5200 goes I have seen a 40+ foot sail boat being picked up as they were trying to unstep the the mast with only 5200 holding it to the deck [:O]
Paid Advertisement
--