AR15.Com Archives
 What's an easy way to fill an empty eroded space under a driveway?
AdviceDog  [Member]
2/27/2013 3:36:26 PM
friend has a house that's about 7 years old... looks like the gutter drain near teh driveway and have eroded a decent sized cavity under teh driveway.

Can this be effectively backfilled with soil or some type of cement like SCC??
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Jeffru  [Member]
2/27/2013 3:38:05 PM
You can use grout and pump it in. Like what is used in CMU walls. Or also a flowable fill but Ive never used that one.
cthulhu  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 3:38:34 PM
Hookers.
Bostekrisco  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 3:40:40 PM
Liberals
DavidW24  [Member]
2/27/2013 3:41:51 PM
Originally Posted By Bostekrisco:
Liberals


+1

cap with grout
Jeffru  [Member]
2/27/2013 3:44:42 PM
Originally Posted By DavidW24:
Originally Posted By Bostekrisco:
Liberals


+1

cap with grout


This is acceptable also. But I advise compacting to a minimum of 95% those idiots are full of air and will leave a bigger void to fill.

dubBinSEA  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 3:44:48 PM



lol....advicedog is asking for advice
gjg  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 3:46:10 PM
sand.....water
VBC  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 3:47:23 PM
You can fill it in with grout, but unless the drainage grade is altered, the water is just going to end up washing out another void.

Longshot171  [Member]
2/27/2013 3:48:44 PM
Bug your local concrete contractor, or ready mix co.,, or google mudjacking. no joke.
AdviceDog  [Member]
2/27/2013 3:48:55 PM
Originally Posted By dubBinSEA:



lol....advicedog is asking for advice


To be fair- I did write the PSA last year telling everyone that flat screen monitors were pretty cool and seemed to be here to stay and that folks might want to look into them....
AdviceDog  [Member]
2/27/2013 3:52:36 PM
Originally Posted By Longshot171:
Bug your local concrete contractor, or ready mix co.,, or google mudjacking. no joke.


Thanks- that's kind of what I was wondering about - an expanding concrete or something to fill the void... the driveway hasn't started to settle or crack jet as far as we can tell...

Any idea on costs for a residential driveway?? ballparkish..
NAM  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 3:55:58 PM
Originally Posted By cthulhu:
Hookers.


SPNI
hooligan223  [Member]
2/27/2013 3:56:44 PM
If you're worried about cost you could dig down beside it and tamp in some fill dirt from side and fill the dug out hole back level with the driveway when finished.
SirSqueeboo  [Life Member]
2/27/2013 4:00:41 PM
The Russians use AK mags.
WhyTanFox  [Life Member]
2/27/2013 4:01:42 PM
AZ_Sky  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 4:04:01 PM
I had that problem with my driveway once.
I had to have it mudjacked.
sommere54  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 4:05:25 PM
Step 1. Get a bag of Quickrete, doesn't even matter what kind
Step 2. Add enough water to small batches in a bucket to get a very dry mix, not even peanut butter consistency, you shouldn't be able to roll it into a ball in your hands.
Step 3. Start packing it in the hole. Use a 2x4, broom handle, or anything else you can fit to shove it back as far as it will go. Continue until built out flush to edge of existing concrete.
Step 4. Adjust existing dirt grade and/or downspout to ensure positive drainage away from driveway and the house. Otherwise you will get to repeat the process farther down the line.

Cost for a residential driveway will vary greatly by area, but should be in the neighborhood of $4/SF for a new driveway installation on already installed solid base material. For tear-out/replace we are closer to $7/SF.
FrankSymptoms  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 5:05:00 PM
Originally Posted By Bostekrisco:
Liberals


Won't work, gotta use a dead conservative.

Liberals have no substance.
AdviceDog  [Member]
2/27/2013 5:15:19 PM
Originally Posted By sommere54:
Step 1. Get a bag of Quickrete, doesn't even matter what kind
Step 2. Add enough water to small batches in a bucket to get a very dry mix, not even peanut butter consistency, you shouldn't be able to roll it into a ball in your hands.
Step 3. Start packing it in the hole. Use a 2x4, broom handle, or anything else you can fit to shove it back as far as it will go. Continue until built out flush to edge of existing concrete.
Step 4. Adjust existing dirt grade and/or downspout to ensure positive drainage away from driveway and the house. Otherwise you will get to repeat the process farther down the line.

Cost for a residential driveway will vary greatly by area, but should be in the neighborhood of $4/SF for a new driveway installation on already installed solid base material. For tear-out/replace we are closer to $7/SF.


Will there any issue with the soil settling and leaving a new gap at the top of the quickrete patch??
AdviceDog  [Member]
2/27/2013 6:13:43 PM
Originally Posted By SirSqueeboo:
The Russians use AK mags.


But these days... the used ones are $30....
TexasOutdoorsman  [Member]
2/27/2013 6:20:45 PM
Originally Posted By Jeffru:
You can use grout and pump it in. Like what is used in CMU walls. Or also a flowable fill but Ive never used that one.


flowable fill is the way to go - 'trashcrete'
insert 2" fill pipe, insert 2" vent pipe so the whole crevasse gets filled...anything else and you'll be doing it again in a few years...
EchoSix  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 6:25:27 PM
Sommere54's advice is exactly how you want to do it.

Dry as a bone concrete mix shoved in there as tightly as you can, in any way you can. And since it's so dry, you'll kinda' want to do it as quickly as you can, before it cures and becomes too difficult to manipulate.

But, depending on how long the ground has been cleared away under the asphalt, the damage is probably already done. The top layer has already started settling and a crack is probably inevitable.
JosephTurrisi  [Member]
2/27/2013 6:37:42 PM
order a yard of concrete from the local plant and tell them you need them to add plasticizer to the mix. The driver will add it once he gets to your home and it will make the concrete very liquid build a form just a little higher than the area to be filled in and pour the concrete in. It will also help to rent a vibrator from the local rent all to help the concrete flow back in the hole.
shadowr1  [Member]
2/27/2013 6:38:58 PM
I had to do that with my side walk. I just used my old gunpowder I had laying around.









GeorgiaBII  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 6:40:55 PM
toss in a few bags of cement and fill with the hose.
Mosspointers  [Member]
2/27/2013 6:41:30 PM
Mississippi clay
pseudojd  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 6:44:20 PM
expandable foam. That shit is perfect for this. I’ve seen folks use it instead of concrete for a while now. Shit will last forever.
pseudojd  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 6:45:12 PM


This. It has MANY more uses than advertised.
No_BS  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 6:57:01 PM
Originally Posted By AdviceDog:
Originally Posted By Longshot171:
Bug your local concrete contractor, or ready mix co.,, or google mudjacking. no joke.


Thanks- that's kind of what I was wondering about - an expanding concrete or something to fill the void... the driveway hasn't started to settle or crack jet as far as we can tell...

Any idea on costs for a residential driveway?? ballparkish..


not enough information, but $5-$7 sq/ft for tearout/removal and repour........at least here in indiana
sommere54  [Team Member]
2/27/2013 9:24:05 PM
Originally Posted By AdviceDog:
Originally Posted By sommere54:
Step 1. Get a bag of Quickrete, doesn't even matter what kind
Step 2. Add enough water to small batches in a bucket to get a very dry mix, not even peanut butter consistency, you shouldn't be able to roll it into a ball in your hands.
Step 3. Start packing it in the hole. Use a 2x4, broom handle, or anything else you can fit to shove it back as far as it will go. Continue until built out flush to edge of existing concrete.
Step 4. Adjust existing dirt grade and/or downspout to ensure positive drainage away from driveway and the house. Otherwise you will get to repeat the process farther down the line.

Cost for a residential driveway will vary greatly by area, but should be in the neighborhood of $4/SF for a new driveway installation on already installed solid base material. For tear-out/replace we are closer to $7/SF.


Will there any issue with the soil settling and leaving a new gap at the top of the quickrete patch??


If the soil or base underneath the area you are filling is soft and/or muddy, remove it until you reach decent material. The main objective should be to fill the void as completely as possible (with anything other than expanding foam ) and then make sure that drainage is working correctly - away from the structure and the driveway.

Unless you have enough room in this hole under the driveway to crawl in and take a nap, no need to order a whole yard from ready-mix. Way too much money and way too much material. A bag of quickrete or similar will likely be all you need.

hbilly  [Member]
2/28/2013 10:16:27 AM
The whole issue is it is washing out. If you use the "mudjacking" direction you're succeptible to it resettling. The problem is your base. Its going to continue to wash out unless you deal with the water issue first. The only way to fix properly is remove/replace. And a proper base should be raised in stages, rolled/tamped/and topped with a good stone. 307's for a base with 57s for a top is what works best in my opinion. And wetting the stone before compaction helps alot.
BKC1869  [Member]
2/28/2013 10:40:37 AM
Originally Posted By Jeffru:
You can use grout and pump it in. Like what is used in CMU walls. Or also a flowable fill but Ive never used that one.


Along the lines of what I was thinking too.
lockinload  [Team Member]
2/28/2013 10:48:06 AM
Non shrink grout is the only way to go. It can even be dry packed if necessary.
All concrete products shrink. Non shrink grouts actually expand prior to shrinking so you
end up with a neutral loss in your void.
Surf  [Team Member]
2/28/2013 10:49:10 AM
Originally Posted By Jeffru:
You can use grout and pump it in. Like what is used in CMU walls. Or also a flowable fill but Ive never used that one.


this works

tagged for my photos of stairs
smaddox  [Life Member]
2/28/2013 10:50:00 AM
Use really soupy concrete. Frame it in so it fills up. Let dry for several days.
AdviceDog  [Member]
2/28/2013 1:47:49 PM
Ok.. regardless of the method- how do I avoid leaving a gap or void between the new fill and the bottom of the driveway slab?? will hand packing or a flowable mix overcome the void issue??

Thanks for all the replies.
ScopeScar  [Team Member]
2/28/2013 1:57:59 PM
I made my own grout injection "machine" to fill some voids about 0.5 cubic feet.

You could probably scale it up.

1. Get a section of PVC pipe of suitable diameter and length.
2. Get fittings to reduce one end to a hose barb size, like for 5/8" ID vinyl tubing
3. Get fittings to thread the other end with a cap.
4. Drill a small hole in the cap end (or create a more elaborate air hose connection system)
5. Obtain a large funnel or scoop that places grout into the tube without making a mess on the threads
6. Mix grout (5 gal bucket + drill + mixing bit), mix it a bit on the thin size. use grout, not mortar, not concrete they will not flow in this system
7. Put grout into pipe and cap
8. Take air hose and stuff it into the hole on the cap
9. Put tube into place you want to fill
10. carefully pressurize assembly

You might want to make a stand for a large system since a grout-filled pipe gets heavy fast.
sommere54  [Team Member]
2/28/2013 2:12:09 PM
Originally Posted By AdviceDog:
Ok.. regardless of the method- how do I avoid leaving a gap or void between the new fill and the bottom of the driveway slab?? will hand packing or a flowable mix overcome the void issue??

Thanks for all the replies.


This is why dry-packing is the best method. Concrete or grout in a more liquid state will contain more air that needs to be removed by vibration (which you won't be able to do effectively in this situation, even with a vibrator) and will shrink considerably during the curing process.

Again, unless you can bury a decent sized dog in this washout, pack it full of quickrete or similar product and make sure to address the drainage issue that caused the problem in the first place.

I've been a concrete contractor for 15+ years, if you want to take some pics and send them to me, shoot me an IM and I'll give you my number.

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