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 Old School C-117 (Douglas DC3) Wednesday
KA3B  [Life Member]
8/29/2012 11:02:37 PM










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KA3B  [Life Member]
8/29/2012 11:03:53 PM








AeroE  [Team Member]
8/29/2012 11:04:30 PM
R4D's

The vertical tail is the giveaway.

Still neat airplanes, too. My left leg is still wet from my flight as pilot in a DC-3, shoot, I guess 30 years ago.





KA3B  [Life Member]
8/29/2012 11:06:02 PM








KA3B  [Life Member]
8/29/2012 11:06:28 PM
Originally Posted By AeroE:
R4D's
The vertical tail is the giveaway.
Still neat airplanes, too.


C-117D's.

GLHX2112  [Team Member]
8/29/2012 11:06:44 PM
I wonder if there are any Super DC-3's still flying? I though I saw a vid of one back in 2009 still airworthy.
KA3B  [Life Member]
8/29/2012 11:08:32 PM








KA3B  [Life Member]
8/29/2012 11:10:10 PM








AeroE  [Team Member]
8/29/2012 11:10:18 PM
Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By AeroE:
R4D's
The vertical tail is the giveaway.
Still neat airplanes, too.


C-117D's.



I know. This is what we do in GD.

Dumpster_Baby  [Team Member]
8/29/2012 11:10:57 PM









KA3B  [Life Member]
8/29/2012 11:11:50 PM








warp_foo  [Team Member]
8/29/2012 11:12:26 PM
I recall awaiting takeoff from Homestead back in the early '90s (pre-Andrew), when we were told that we were cleared for departure after a -117 on final cleared the runway. My thought process was cool, I get to see an old school piston job.

I was actually disappointed that it was an F-117 and not a C-117...

m
Dagger41  [Team Member]
8/29/2012 11:13:16 PM
Interesting. I have never seen one with that tail config.
Adavantages ? More rudder authority ?
KA3B  [Life Member]
8/29/2012 11:13:34 PM








KA3B  [Life Member]
8/29/2012 11:14:00 PM
Ends.
KA3B  [Life Member]
8/29/2012 11:17:38 PM
The R4D-8 (Super DC-3) was a reworked DC-3 that included a strengthened and stretched fuselage, new horizontal and vertical tail
surfaces with squared tips, squared wing tips, smoother engine nacelles with doors that completely enclosed the landing gear and more
powerful 1,475 hp Wright R-1820-80 radial engines.

What is an R4D, a C-47, a C-117 and why?
Before the adoption of the Tri-Service system in 1962, the US Navy had its own system of aircraft designations, completely different from
that used by the USAAF and USAF.

The Navy system consisted of up to five parts:
One or two letters to indicate the function of the aircraft.
A sequence number, to distinguish between aircraft of the same function built by the same manufacturer.
A letter to indicate the manufacturer.
After a dash, a number to indicate a subtype.
A letter to indicate a minor variation on a subtype.

This is how the R4D-5 was identified in Navy speak:

R = Transport (type aircraft)
4 = Fourth type in the series from the manufacturer
D = Douglas (manufacturer)
(after the dash)
5 = Subtype of the model

The R4D-5 in USAF speak was called the C-47A.

The USAF designation consists of a letter (or set of letters) indicating the type / mission of the aircraft, and a sequence number indicating a
specific aircraft within a category, separated by a dash.
The number may be followed by a series letter to indicate a variant of an aircraft.

C = Cargo transport
47 = Sequence number (for USAAF cargo transport aircraft)
(after the dash)
A = Variant of model

On September 18, 1962, the Defense Department ordered that all Air Force, Army, and Navy aircraft be designated under a common, universal system.
This was done because Secretary McNamara was interested in achieving greater commonality between the services.
According to one story, he supposedly had gotten hopelessly confused when his aides told him that the Navy and the Air Force had completely different
designation schemes, often for what was basically the same aircraft.
Under the Defense Department order, the separate naval designation system which had been around since 1922 was eliminated.
Thus was born the Tri-Service system of 1962.

The R4D-5 became the C-47H.
The R5D-6 became the C-47J.
The R4D-8 became the C-117D.

Why was the R4D-8 a C-117 and not a C-47?
Due the major modifications that were done to the R4D-8 it was deemed "different" enough to be considered a new type of aircraft.
The USAF tested the prototype Super DC-3 as the YC-129-DO.
The USAF later changed the designation of the YC-129-DO to YC-47F-DO.
Frank_The_Tank  [Team Member]
8/29/2012 11:24:09 PM
Originally Posted By Dagger41:
Interesting. I have never seen one with that tail config.
Adavantages ? More rudder authority ?


Yeah. Probably.
phatmax  [Team Member]
8/29/2012 11:34:14 PM
Gooney birds.

Wheel fairing s look weird.

Never flown in one, sadly. My dad flew in a pre-war model.
seahorse  [Team Member]
8/29/2012 11:52:47 PM
As an Army brat living on Taiwan in the 50's I flew on those. Long time ago and I was very young so barely remember it.

Thanks for the photos.
Beamy  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 12:05:14 AM
Its interesting seeing pics of these still operating as late as the early 1980s. When were the Goonie's finally retired from the US military and who was the last brach to fly them?
Stevo89  [Member]
8/30/2012 12:14:55 AM
Looks like Trans Northern out of Anchorage is still flying Kenn Borek's old Super DC-3.

elcope  [Life Member]
8/30/2012 12:24:17 AM
Originally Posted By Beamy:
Its interesting seeing pics of these still operating as late as the early 1980s. When were the Goonie's finally retired from the US military and who was the last brach to fly them?


Not sure for the U.S. Military, but a buddy of mine was one of the pilots to rescue one of the last serving C-47's in military service in the world in Israel and flew it back across the same way it came over in the 40's.

Their story is Well worth the time to read

Dagger41  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 12:30:25 AM
Originally Posted By Stevo89:
Looks like Trans Northern out of Anchorage is still flying Kenn Borek's old Super DC-3.

http://www.transnorthern.com/images/header1.jpg


I believe that aircraft is still in service. Now it's running turboprops. Saw it cruising around here a few weeks ago.



Goodn  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 12:31:29 AM
Here's an interesting one.

Makes you double take when you look at a DC-3 and hear turbines.
HK_farmer  [Member]
8/30/2012 12:35:06 AM
Frank_The_Tank  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 12:39:33 AM
Originally Posted By Goodn:
Here's an interesting one.

Makes you double take when you look at a DC-3 and hear turbines.
http://www.douglasdc3.com/osh2002/n.jpg


What is that, a cargo pod with a huge NACA duct?
Goodn  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 12:44:30 AM
Originally Posted By Frank_The_Tank:
Originally Posted By Goodn:
Here's an interesting one.

Makes you double take when you look at a DC-3 and hear turbines.
http://www.douglasdc3.com/osh2002/n.jpg


What is that, a cargo pod with a huge NACA duct?


Ventral tank for fire bombing I believe. There a lot of pics without it on that aircraft.
discworld717  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 12:45:28 AM
Nothing says american awesome to me more than the DC3.
GunnyG  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 12:46:05 AM

Anyone want to run through the EP's with me?
Goodn  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 12:50:26 AM
Originally Posted By GunnyG:
http://i215.photobucket.com/albums/cc68/gunnyg_photos/Private/NAS%20Moffett/DSC07501.jpg

Anyone want to run through the EP's with me?


Very nice!
GLHX2112  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 1:19:29 AM
Originally Posted By Beamy:
Its interesting seeing pics of these still operating as late as the early 1980s. When were the Goonie's finally retired from the US military and who was the last brach to fly them?


Gulp, looking at the dates on those pics, they were still flying those darn things two years before I enlisted.

If I ever became stupid-rich, I would get the BT-67 conversion done in a heartbeat.
MiG-21  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 1:30:55 AM
The first active military aircraft I ever flew in was a Canadian AF C-47 from Barksdale AFB to Shreveport Regional in 1985. Seems Barksdale only had jp-4 and no avgas.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
akcaribouhunter  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 2:50:09 AM
Still a few of the DC 3 and 6's flying around up here.
Sleeper396  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 8:30:29 AM
I love the DC3. Its in my opinion the aircraft that brought America a lot of its prosperity during the 50s 60s and 70s. My favorite DC3



This company made its mechanics wear white pants and had uniform regulations. They kept their plane spotless, and was very family centric in what they did. I wish they were still operating today.
They didn't get closed, they were bought by US Airways because US Airways wanted to try and capture some of their ethos. Too bad they failed at that.
KA3B  [Life Member]
8/30/2012 12:42:34 PM
Originally Posted By GunnyG:
http://i215.photobucket.com/albums/cc68/gunnyg_photos/Private/NAS%20Moffett/DSC07501.jpg

Anyone want to run through the EP's with me?



NATOPS = Navy's Attempt To Operate Planes Safely.

GunnyG  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 12:44:40 PM

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By GunnyG:
http://i215.photobucket.com/albums/cc68/gunnyg_photos/Private/NAS%20Moffett/DSC07501.jpg

Anyone want to run through the EP's with me?



NATOPS = Navy's Attempt To Operate Planes Safely.



KA3B  [Life Member]
8/30/2012 1:07:39 PM
Originally Posted By Beamy:
Its interesting seeing pics of these still operating as late as the early 1980s. When were the Goonie's finally retired from the US military and who was the last brach to fly them?


The USAF retired its last DC3 in 1975.
The Navy retired its last DC3 in 1976.
The last U.S. Marine Corps C-117, BUNO 50835, was retired from active service during June 1982, ending the use of the DC3 for US Military operations.

50835 was last operated as MCAS Iwakuni's station hack.
It was flown to MCAS El Toro and put on display.
When MCAS El Toro closed 50835 was moved from El Toro to MCAS Miramar where it is on display with the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum.
http://www.flyingleathernecks.org/exhibits/transports/douglas-r4d-8-super-gooney/33


50835 was originally built as a USAAF Douglas C-47B-20-DK, Douglas constructors number 26998.
Transferred to the US Navy as an R4D-6
Modified to R4D-8 specs with a new constructors number, 43321.
Redesignated C-117D in 1962.
Transferred to the US Marines in 1963.
On static display at MCAS Miramar, CA.
Mass-Length-Time  [Team Member]
8/30/2012 1:51:16 PM
Thanks for this! I have an uncle that was a Marine pilot in WWII and Korea. My memory was that he had flown R4Ds, but motivated by your thread, I went back and re-read his memoirs. Turns out he flew R4Qs (C-119) - an entirely different beast!

He flew a lot of things - F4U-1D in combat in PTO, F6F, F4U-4, L-19 (OY-1?) as a FAC in Korea, F4U-5, R4Q, R5D, and even qual'ed in T33s.

He's still kicking at 90, God bless him. Still drinking his martinis everyday too, I suspect :)
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