AR15.Com Archives
 CNET: "This Internet provider pledges to put your privacy first. Always."
RickyRifle  [Member]
4/13/2012 4:33:22 PM
(Apologies if it's a dupe - can't search GD and didn't have hits on Google using "ar15.com" and "Calyx")


http://news.cnet.com/8301-31921_3-57412225-281/this-internet-provider-pledges-to-put-your-privacy-first-always/

"Nicholas Merrill is planning to revolutionize online privacy with a concept as simple as it is ingenious: a telecommunications provider designed from its inception to shield its customers from surveillance.
Merrill, 39, who previously ran a New York-based Internet provider, told CNET that he's raising funds to launch a national "non-profit telecommunications provider dedicated to privacy, using ubiquitous encryption" that will sell mobile phone service and, for as little as $20 a month, Internet connectivity.

The ISP would not merely employ every technological means at its disposal, including encryption and limited logging, to protect its customers. It would also –– and in practice this is likely more important –– challenge government surveillance demands of dubious legality or constitutionality"





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Metallurgist  [Team Member]
4/13/2012 4:34:13 PM
US gov: good luck with that.
AR4U  [Team Member]
4/13/2012 4:34:14 PM
Interesting.
Foxnews_FTW  [Team Member]
4/13/2012 4:38:47 PM
IMHO he could totally run it for profit with similar services/pricing when compared to other ISPs, with the sole difference being privacy- and he would make bank.
TailHunter  [Team Member]
4/13/2012 4:39:51 PM
Originally Posted By Foxnews_FTW:
IMHO he could totally run it for profit with similar services/pricing when compared to other ISPs, with the sole difference being privacy- and he would make bank.


QFT
c0t0d0s0  [Team Member]
4/13/2012 4:39:56 PM
Originally Posted By Foxnews_FTW:
IMHO he could totally run it for profit with similar services/pricing when compared to other ISPs, with the sole difference being privacy- and he would make bank.


Or it could be a subsidiary of the MPAA and just trying to get direct access to your usage.
RickyRifle  [Member]
4/13/2012 4:45:12 PM

Originally Posted By c0t0d0s0:
Originally Posted By Foxnews_FTW:
IMHO he could totally run it for profit with similar services/pricing when compared to other ISPs, with the sole difference being privacy- and he would make bank.


Or it could be a subsidiary of the MPAA and just trying to get direct access to your usage.

Did you read the highlighted part?

"His recipe for Calyx was inspired by those six years of interminable legal wrangling with the Feds: Take wireless service like that offered by Clear, which began selling 4G WiMAX broadband in 2009. Inject end-to-end encryption for Web browsing. Add e-mail that's stored in encrypted form, so even Calyx can't read it after it arrives. Wrap all of this up into an easy-to-use package and sell it for competitive prices, ideally around $20 a month without data caps, though perhaps prepaid for a full year."



Layer60  [Member]
4/13/2012 4:49:18 PM
Originally Posted By Metallurgist:
US gov: good luck with that.


c0t0d0s0  [Team Member]
4/13/2012 4:51:12 PM
Originally Posted By RickyRifle:

Originally Posted By c0t0d0s0:
Originally Posted By Foxnews_FTW:
IMHO he could totally run it for profit with similar services/pricing when compared to other ISPs, with the sole difference being privacy- and he would make bank.


Or it could be a subsidiary of the MPAA and just trying to get direct access to your usage.

Did you read the highlighted part?

"His recipe for Calyx was inspired by those six years of interminable legal wrangling with the Feds: Take wireless service like that offered by Clear, which began selling 4G WiMAX broadband in 2009. Inject end-to-end encryption for Web browsing. Add e-mail that's stored in encrypted form, so even Calyx can't read it after it arrives. Wrap all of this up into an easy-to-use package and sell it for competitive prices, ideally around $20 a month without data caps, though perhaps prepaid for a full year."





If he's doing the encrypting then he can read them.
RickyRifle  [Member]
4/13/2012 4:52:50 PM

Originally Posted By Layer60:
Originally Posted By Metallurgist:
US gov: good luck with that.



Meh.

At least make them work for it:

"Even if Calyx encrypts everything, the surveillance arms of the FBI and the bureau's lesser-known counterparts will still have other legal means to eavesdrop on Americans, of course. Police can remotely install spyware on a suspect's computer. Or install keyloggers by breaking into a home or office. Or, as the Secret Service outlined at last year's RSA conference, they can try to guess passwords and conduct physical surveillance.

That prospect doesn't exactly please the FBI. ..."



AR4U  [Team Member]
4/13/2012 4:53:23 PM
Originally Posted By c0t0d0s0:
Originally Posted By Foxnews_FTW:
IMHO he could totally run it for profit with similar services/pricing when compared to other ISPs, with the sole difference being privacy- and he would make bank.


Or it could be a subsidiary of the MPAA and just trying to get direct access to your usage.


Seems like the guy has gone through a lot just for it to be a MPAA setup.
RickyRifle  [Member]
4/13/2012 4:56:48 PM

Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By c0t0d0s0:
Originally Posted By Foxnews_FTW:
IMHO he could totally run it for profit with similar services/pricing when compared to other ISPs, with the sole difference being privacy- and he would make bank.


Or it could be a subsidiary of the MPAA and just trying to get direct access to your usage.


Seems like the guy has gone through a lot just for it to be a MPAA setup.

Yeah, you'd think they'd go after some easier targets by setting up some honeytrap torrents.
AR4U  [Team Member]
4/13/2012 5:01:42 PM
Originally Posted By RickyRifle:

Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By c0t0d0s0:
Originally Posted By Foxnews_FTW:
IMHO he could totally run it for profit with similar services/pricing when compared to other ISPs, with the sole difference being privacy- and he would make bank.


Or it could be a subsidiary of the MPAA and just trying to get direct access to your usage.


Seems like the guy has gone through a lot just for it to be a MPAA setup.

Yeah, you'd think they'd go after some easier targets by setting up some honeytrap torrents.


Those people should be arrested for extortion, and possibly RICO.
RickyRifle  [Member]
4/13/2012 5:05:48 PM
Man, I figured this thread would be a libertarian vs neo-con slugfest by now. Does Dave-A still post? I've been out of the loop for a while.



Anyway, here's the link mentioned in the article to the guys fundraising site for getting this project off the ground:

http://www.indiegogo.com/calyx


TheJacket  [Member]
4/13/2012 5:38:01 PM
I wish I was in a position to contribute towards his effort.

RJGatling  [Member]
4/13/2012 9:46:08 PM
Originally Posted By RickyRifle:
Man, I figured this thread would be a libertarian vs neo-con slugfest by now. Does Dave-A still post? I've been out of the loop for a while.



Anyway, here's the link mentioned in the article to the guys fundraising site for getting this project off the ground:

http://www.indiegogo.com/calyx




Dave's not here, man.
RickyRifle  [Member]
4/13/2012 11:49:37 PM

Originally Posted By TheJacket:
I wish I was in a position to contribute towards his effort.


After reading this, I decided to make a donation:

http://www.infoworld.com/d/data-center/your-privacy-sci-fi-fantasy-189330




Waveform  [Team Member]
4/13/2012 11:54:27 PM
Good to hear.
Slavac  [Team Member]
4/14/2012 12:05:56 AM
Dupe, but a worthy dupe.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1310586_Internet_Provider_Plans__Secure__ISP_Project.html
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