AR15.Com Archives
 Season Cast Iron Cookware with Flax Seed Oil for a Long-Lasting, Gorgeous Coat
OhioLongRange  [Member]
1/30/2012 3:41:44 AM EST
http://lifehacker.com/5880406/season-cast-iron-cookware-with-flax-seed-oil-for-a-long+lasting-gorgeous-coat

good read..
Paid Advertisement
--
EastcARstle  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 3:46:44 AM EST


You guys always bring me the very best violence gourmet cooking tips
Mall-Ninja  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 3:48:00 AM EST
Can anyone actually confirm this?

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
MetalAndy  [Member]
1/30/2012 3:59:47 AM EST
also known as linseed oil. often used as a finish for wood. However, I have no idea if it works.

Just don't use boiled linseed oil from what I hear. Contains metallic dryers sometimes. sometimes poisonous ones (i saw and old can with cadmium in it). It will be printed on the bottle/can. I use one for a cutting board that had zinc in it.

you might have to look at a hardware store/woodworking place. sometimes butcher block finish has linseed oil, but usually is has other oils.
Brak  [Member]
1/30/2012 4:06:12 AM EST
It's all just splitting hairs, IMO. Season and use it correctly, and the type of oil you used won't make much of a difference, in my (admittedly limited) experience.
amaixner  [Member]
1/30/2012 4:12:28 AM EST
Bacon is the best seasoning agent for cast iron, because you can eat it!
packingXDs  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 4:16:13 AM EST

Originally Posted By amaixner:
Bacon is the best seasoning agent for cast iron, because you can eat it!

Yep, I will stick to bacon. Brand new pans get one or two passes with crisco, but after that its bacon all the way.
TEXASROOTERSBROTHER  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 4:31:12 AM EST
Originally Posted By packingXDs:

Originally Posted By amaixner:
Bacon is the best seasoning agent for cast iron, because you can eat it!

Yep, I will stick to bacon. Brand new pans get one or two passes with crisco, but after that its bacon all the way.


I think bacon is the best but it does have salt in it. Lard is probabaly the best . I don't like veg oil but will try the flax seed on the next pot. I have not had much luck at seasoning pans since I got married
Wife seems to have a problem with the smoke comeing out of the oven
I have been doing it over charcoal lately .

I think their method may be the reason that they have been getting good results. 5 times at 500 degrees
California_Kid  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 4:34:51 AM EST

Originally Posted By TEXASROOTERSBROTHER:
Originally Posted By packingXDs:

Originally Posted By amaixner:
Bacon is the best seasoning agent for cast iron, because you can eat it!

Yep, I will stick to bacon. Brand new pans get one or two passes with crisco, but after that its bacon all the way.


I think bacon is the best but it does have salt in it....

That is why I rinse my cast iron cookware in hot water, brushing out excess oil and any remaining food bits with a stiff nylon brush.

Bacon is king, and my cast iron skillets are all gorgeous.
packingXDs  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 4:36:17 AM EST

Originally Posted By California_Kid:

Originally Posted By TEXASROOTERSBROTHER:
Originally Posted By packingXDs:

Originally Posted By amaixner:
Bacon is the best seasoning agent for cast iron, because you can eat it!

Yep, I will stick to bacon. Brand new pans get one or two passes with crisco, but after that its bacon all the way.


I think bacon is the best but it does have salt in it....

That is why I rinse my cast iron cookware in hot water, brushing out excess oil and any remaining food bits with a stiff nylon brush.

Bacon is king, and my cast iron skillets are all gorgeous.

I use kosher salt to scrub my pans clean.

wildearp  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 5:40:04 AM EST
Bacon and hash browns always gives mine a nice finish after oil seasoning in the oven.


No need to overthink this very simple process. It ain't like you are parkerizing under the FSB or Chroming your bore.
TireGuy01  [Member]
1/30/2012 5:52:18 AM EST
I have always cooked a couple pounds of bacon off in a new skillet and then let it sit in a warm oven for an hour or so. Wipe out the grease and all is GTG.
DragoMuseveni  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 5:55:46 AM EST
I thought the point of seasoning a cast iron cookware was to create very think layer of carbon to make a smooth non stick surface. What matter does the oil make if it's going to be burned down to carbon anyways?

TEXASROOTERSBROTHER  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 6:40:42 AM EST
Originally Posted By packingXDs:

Originally Posted By California_Kid:

Originally Posted By TEXASROOTERSBROTHER:
Originally Posted By packingXDs:

Originally Posted By amaixner:
Bacon is the best seasoning agent for cast iron, because you can eat it!

Yep, I will stick to bacon. Brand new pans get one or two passes with crisco, but after that its bacon all the way.


I think bacon is the best but it does have salt in it....

That is why I rinse my cast iron cookware in hot water, brushing out excess oil and any remaining food bits with a stiff nylon brush.

Bacon is king, and my cast iron skillets are all gorgeous.

I use kosher salt to scrub my pans clean.



I use b acon grease and to me it does seem much better than crisco. As long as it is washed and dried before putting up the salt has no harmfull effect.
One thing to remember is that in the old days they did not have anything except lard and bacon grease and they worked fine.

Do any of you sand new pots before you season. New cast iron seems so rough.
AR4U  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 6:42:24 AM EST
Originally Posted By Mall-Ninja:
Can anyone actually confirm this?

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


I have a crack in my skillet, so when I get around to replacing it I'll post here with the results of seasoning its replacement.
callgood  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 6:49:29 AM EST
Originally Posted By MetalAndy:
also known as linseed oil. often used as a finish for wood. However, I have no idea if it works.

Just don't use boiled linseed oil from what I hear. Contains metallic dryers sometimes. sometimes poisonous ones (i saw and old can with cadmium in it). It will be printed on the bottle/can. I use one for a cutting board that had zinc in it.

you might have to look at a hardware store/woodworking place. sometimes butcher block finish has linseed oil, but usually is has other oils.


You might try substituting mineral oil on your cutting board. I use it on the board I use to roll out my pizza dough.

Flaxseed oil is claimed to have many beneficial components.

gitarmac  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 11:46:10 AM EST
I use flax for my cast iron and my cutting boards.
bchapman  [Member]
1/30/2012 11:52:12 AM EST
This morning I made gravy in cast iron I finished with flaxseed oil - not a bit stuck to the skillet. It works extremely well and I'll continue to season my cast iron this way.
twestbrook10  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 11:54:52 AM EST
I used to take flax seed oil every day with meals for Omega 3s but have since switched over to fish oil.
1catquak  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 12:03:41 PM EST
I use safflower oil and season my pans upside down in my outdoor grill at 500F.
500 is needed to burn the oil and get carbon.
Outside so I don't smoke out the house.

I brought back to life six old rusted up pans by sand blasting and seasoning this way.
I can fry an egg without it sticking on the first use.

Learned about the safflower oil right here on ARFCOM
ColdboreDreamer  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 12:09:53 PM EST
Another vote for bacon. The pan always seems to have a better sheen than when I use canola or peanut oil. I would think the salt is only a concern because of corrosion.

if you see rust developing in your cast iron pan maybe it just needs more bacon cooked in it.
Rincon_11  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 12:33:32 PM EST

Originally Posted By California_Kid:

Originally Posted By TEXASROOTERSBROTHER:
Originally Posted By packingXDs:

Originally Posted By amaixner:
Bacon is the best seasoning agent for cast iron, because you can eat it!

Yep, I will stick to bacon. Brand new pans get one or two passes with crisco, but after that its bacon all the way.


I think bacon is the best but it does have salt in it....

That is why I rinse my cast iron cookware in hot water, brushing out excess oil and any remaining food bits with a stiff nylon brush.

Bacon is king, and my cast iron skillets are all gorgeous.

Won't this tare up the surface you are creating? I've been wondering about this for a while as the only cleaning my skillet gets is scrapping at it with a nylon spatula and once in a great while, wiping it down with a wet paper towel. Works ok, but if I get some burnt food on it, it's a real PITA. Can you actually wash it with no ill affects to the surface finish.
LePew  [Member]
1/30/2012 12:41:21 PM EST
washing under hot water only, with a good nylon brush, doesn't seem to damage my skillets' seasoning...which is mostly bacon based
piciphant  [Member]
1/30/2012 12:42:16 PM EST
peanut oil will even season stainless.
Ohio  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 12:50:59 PM EST
Originally Posted By DragoMuseveni:
I thought the point of seasoning a cast iron cookware was to create very think layer of carbon to make a smooth non stick surface. What matter does the oil make if it's going to be burned down to carbon anyways?



You are correct. The only worries would be about residue caused by other things in the oil.

I have a 6" cast iron pan that has been seasoned to perfection by nothing more than a teenaged daughter making grilled cheese sandwiches.
Hundreds and hundreds of grilled cheese sandwiches. She's a sweet kid, but with little imagination...
Ohio  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 12:52:21 PM EST
Originally Posted By LePew:
washing under hot water only, with a good nylon brush, doesn't seem to damage my skillets' seasoning...which is mostly bacon based


You can scrub the hell out of it, and use soap, with little or no damage.
Rust, acids, and too much heat are the death of CI seasoning. Don't cook tomatoes, let water sit in the pan, or burn the pan and all will be well.
Rincon_11  [Team Member]
1/30/2012 1:01:37 PM EST

Originally Posted By LePew:
washing under hot water only, with a good nylon brush, doesn't seem to damage my skillets' seasoning...which is mostly bacon based

Good deal, thanks.
Gloftoe  [Moderator]
1/30/2012 1:03:22 PM EST
I always use flax seed oil after cleaning my cast iron. Of course it has a bunch of seasoning built up by pounds of bacon, eggs and gravy.
ColonelPanic  [Member]
1/30/2012 2:03:54 PM EST
You mean you're not supposed to lick the pan you fried the bacon in clean? Hmmm... maybe that's why my cast iron isn't taking a season... oh well, it's worth it.
Still_learning  [Member]
1/30/2012 2:09:35 PM EST
Do NOT use the linseed/flax seed oil that is sold for a wood finish. It has chemicals in it that are toxic.

They sell flax seed oil in health food stores. Use that, as it is safe to eat. By the way, when taken internally, it raises your HDL level (the "good" cholesterol).

This is from WebMD.com:

HDL cholesterol is the well-behaved "good cholesterol." This friendly scavenger cruises the bloodstream. As it does, it removes harmful bad cholesterol from where it doesn't belong. High HDL levels reduce the risk for heart disease –– but low levels increase the risk.

What Makes HDL Cholesterol so Good?

HDL is short for high-density lipoprotein. Each bit of HDL cholesterol is a microscopic blob that consists of a rim of lipoprotein surrounding a cholesterol center. The HDL cholesterol particle is dense compared to other types of cholesterol particles, so it's called high-density.

Cholesterol isn't all bad. In fact, cholesterol is an essential fat. It provides stability in every cell of your body.
Paid Advertisement
--