AR15.Com Archives
 Come along winch: Good for SHTF? Could you pull a light truck or full size car out of the mud w/ 1?
1911greg  [Member]
9/23/2011 9:02:19 AM EST
I've seen them at home depot and auto zone, just wondering if they might come in handy during a SHTF situation such as a natural disaster.

i believe the cheaper one $25 supported 1 ton and the other supported 2 tons?

thoughts?

the only issue would be finding something within about 30 feet to attach it to?
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Zedhead  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 9:04:06 AM EST
I used one to pull an SUV back on to a snow road after it had slipped off. Worked quite well.
skeeterh  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 9:07:33 AM EST
I've used em since I was a kid. Only time I ever had one fail was trying to lift a full size Cherokee body off the frame. Pulled lots of cars, trucks and tractors out of snow mud and ditches. Get a good one.
XJ  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 9:08:28 AM EST
http://www.wyeth-scott.com/index.asp

Kaiser8  [Member]
9/23/2011 9:09:09 AM EST
They work fine for what they are. They only have a reach of about 10 feet though so you would need to supplement with chain, not strap.
ske714  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 9:09:24 AM EST
I've had the same one for many years. Use it all the time. I used it last week to make sure a tree fell the way I wanted. By a good one though. Don't go to Harbor Freight.
GaryM  [Member]
9/23/2011 9:10:11 AM EST
Yes, they do work but they are slow.
Used them a lot back in the day...
AlvinYork  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 9:12:17 AM EST
My dad always kept one in the trunk or truck. So do I.
pen  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 9:13:03 AM EST
1.5 ton Harrington chain come along FTW.


Cable come alongs are an accident waiting to happen.
allenNH  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 9:30:22 AM EST
Originally Posted By pen:
1.5 ton Harrington chain come along FTW.


Cable come alongs are an accident waiting to happen.




You got that backwards hoss.

Cable comealongs are usually rated for higher loads, easy to visually inspect, and will usually give plenty of warning before failure.
Powderfinger  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 9:57:49 AM EST
Originally Posted By pen:
1.5 ton Harrington chain come along FTW.


Cable come alongs are an accident waiting to happen.


Having handled and used many dozens of cable come alongs (many worn/abused to where they had to be finally removed from service) in a severe environment over a 26 year period, I find that untrue. You need to know your tools' limitations though, and how to inspect them.
I'm talking Ingersol-Rand quality, not chinese junk though.

SgtSwat  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 10:05:56 AM EST
I thought this was gonna be a ho thread.
Justin-Kase  [Life Member]
9/23/2011 10:13:23 AM EST
A come along and a tractor jack can do amazing things if you have a bit of ingenuity. Either one of them can do amazing damage if you misuse them.

Both are one my list of must have tools for SHTF.

I've had real good luck with a brand that Home Depot carries, Maasdam. Get at least the 2 ton model, and wear gloves when you handle the cable.
pen  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 1:08:24 PM EST
Originally Posted By Powderfinger:
Originally Posted By pen:
1.5 ton Harrington chain come along FTW.


Cable come alongs are an accident waiting to happen.


Having handled and used many dozens of cable come alongs (many worn/abused to where they had to be finally removed from service) in a severe environment over a 26 year period, I find that untrue. You need to know your tools' limitations though, and how to inspect them.
I'm talking Ingersol-Rand quality, not chinese junk though.




Having used lever hoists, both cable and chain, for 30+ years in industrial maintenance, I find your untrue, to be untrue. I agree you need to know your tools limitations, but a significant number of maintenance programs (that I have worked with) will not even allow cable hoists to be used due to the inherent problems with using them. Releasing them under load, using the standard cable hoist ratchet and pawl system is not safe. Period. The gear reduction system and double pawl used by a quality chain lever hoist is superior. Coffing, Harrington and Yale, though I prefer Harrington because you can get them with a short handle for tight spots.

YMMV

allenNH  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 4:30:34 PM EST
Originally Posted By pen:
Originally Posted By Powderfinger:
Originally Posted By pen:
1.5 ton Harrington chain come along FTW.


Cable come alongs are an accident waiting to happen.


Having handled and used many dozens of cable come alongs (many worn/abused to where they had to be finally removed from service) in a severe environment over a 26 year period, I find that untrue. You need to know your tools' limitations though, and how to inspect them.
I'm talking Ingersol-Rand quality, not chinese junk though.




Having used lever hoists, both cable and chain, for 30+ years in industrial maintenance, I find your untrue, to be untrue. I agree you need to know your tools limitations, but a significant number of maintenance programs (that I have worked with) will not even allow cable hoists to be used due to the inherent problems with using them. Releasing them under load, using the standard cable hoist ratchet and pawl system is not safe. Period. The gear reduction system and double pawl used by a quality chain lever hoist is superior. Coffing, Harrington and Yale, though I prefer Harrington because you can get them with a short handle for tight spots.

YMMV



The OP is asking about pulling vehicles out of the mud, not lifting super heavy shit into the sky.

A pawl failure in a cable comealong is pretty undramatic on the trail. Cables snapping with no warning is basically unheard of. Chain failures happen so often, and are so spectacular, that no offroader in his right mind will use one.

ETA: Food for thought. Which of these items use chains vs. which use steel cable?
- Winches
- Cranes
- Elevators
- Suspension bridges
Ndenway  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 5:13:09 PM EST
get several of them with good pulleys/hooks and solid locking levers (the cheap multi layer/ply levers will fail).

I've had multiple failures over the years trying to pull stuck vehicles out of sand, mud and/or ditches trying to use singles, they work much better when useing two or more in conjunction with one another.

cable failure and spool axle/locking mechinism brakeage/failure, nothing quite like an equipment failure and cable freespooling out suddenly to make you look and feel to be sure you still got all your fingers.

course I was using them in situations they weren't rated to do, but when your by yourself you make do with what equipment you got on hand.

hilift jacks, tow straps, chains and especially winches help a good deal too.


WilliamGray  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 5:18:14 PM EST
I have used them, and I have had better luck with a high lift jack as a winch (yeah, the work like that also). I finally broke down and bought a 4 ton.

LePew  [Member]
9/23/2011 5:30:55 PM EST
Two questions:

1. How to tell the cheap come-alongs from the good ones. (not "don't buy it from these guys" but 'what construction features to look for')

2. Where to shop for the good come-alongs.

palmetto  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 5:38:06 PM EST
I own two and they have saved me a few times. You do need chains, etc to use them.

Last time, it was my tractor stuck pretty bad. I likely violated some safety rules, and it took a while, but I did get it out.
possumlivingdotcom  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 5:38:10 PM EST


This. Cheap come-alongs are crap. I've hurled quite a few of them into the woods. The "More Power" puller is not cheap, though. If you want something cheap that will do a decent job, go to Harbor Freight and get a chain hoist; the 2 ton or more chain-pull kind, not the lever kind. It will give you a workout both using it and hauling it around, but it blows a cheap come-along out of the water.
Another thing that works is a hi-lift jack and some logging chain. Don't bother trying it with a snatch strap or rope; the stretch will use up all the pull of the jack.
allenNH  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 5:43:49 PM EST
Originally Posted By LePew:
Two questions:

1. How to tell the cheap come-alongs from the good ones. (not "don't buy it from these guys" but 'what construction features to look for')

2. Where to shop for the good come-alongs.



http://www.lug-all.com/
hobbsar  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 5:45:49 PM EST
A good come along will have a solid gear not a layered sheet metal gear.
possumlivingdotcom  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 5:49:33 PM EST

Originally Posted By allenNH:
Originally Posted By pen:
Originally Posted By Powderfinger:
Originally Posted By pen:
1.5 ton Harrington chain come along FTW.


Cable come alongs are an accident waiting to happen.


Having handled and used many dozens of cable come alongs (many worn/abused to where they had to be finally removed from service) in a severe environment over a 26 year period, I find that untrue. You need to know your tools' limitations though, and how to inspect them.
I'm talking Ingersol-Rand quality, not chinese junk though.




Having used lever hoists, both cable and chain, for 30+ years in industrial maintenance, I find your untrue, to be untrue. I agree you need to know your tools limitations, but a significant number of maintenance programs (that I have worked with) will not even allow cable hoists to be used due to the inherent problems with using them. Releasing them under load, using the standard cable hoist ratchet and pawl system is not safe. Period. The gear reduction system and double pawl used by a quality chain lever hoist is superior. Coffing, Harrington and Yale, though I prefer Harrington because you can get them with a short handle for tight spots.

YMMV



The OP is asking about pulling vehicles out of the mud, not lifting super heavy shit into the sky.

A pawl failure in a cable comealong is pretty undramatic on the trail. Cables snapping with no warning is basically unheard of. Chain failures happen so often, and are so spectacular, that no offroader in his right mind will use one.

ETA: Food for thought. Which of these items use chains vs. which use steel cable?
- Winches
- Cranes
- Elevators
- Suspension bridges

Those applications use cables because they are flexible, compact and light for their strength. But snapping cables is far from unheard of, and when they do snap, they come back at very high speeds, sometimes up to the speed of sound. People can and do get beheaded by them. That is why winch manuals recommend hanging something (blanket, jacket, whatever) on the line when winching; to slow the cable down if it breaks.
Chains don't whip through the air like that because they stretch very little compared to a cable. I have overloaded and broken both cables and chains, and can tell you from experience that chain is far safer.
yipykyah_mf  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 6:00:28 PM EST
Originally Posted By ske714:
Don't go to Harbor Freight.


Never have truer words been written here.

I bought a HF come-along a few years back. Was using it to crank a Bull Elk up high enough to get it into my truck. Got the animal up enough to back my truck underneath it. KAPOW!!!!!!111!!!1!! It came apart, Elk hit the ground before I could maneuver truck into place. Went to Sears and got a really nice 2 ton for only $30 what I paid for that Chinese POS.
allenNH  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 6:02:34 PM EST
Originally Posted By possumlivingdotcom:

Originally Posted By allenNH:
Originally Posted By pen:
Originally Posted By Powderfinger:
Originally Posted By pen:
1.5 ton Harrington chain come along FTW.


Cable come alongs are an accident waiting to happen.


Having handled and used many dozens of cable come alongs (many worn/abused to where they had to be finally removed from service) in a severe environment over a 26 year period, I find that untrue. You need to know your tools' limitations though, and how to inspect them.
I'm talking Ingersol-Rand quality, not chinese junk though.




Having used lever hoists, both cable and chain, for 30+ years in industrial maintenance, I find your untrue, to be untrue. I agree you need to know your tools limitations, but a significant number of maintenance programs (that I have worked with) will not even allow cable hoists to be used due to the inherent problems with using them. Releasing them under load, using the standard cable hoist ratchet and pawl system is not safe. Period. The gear reduction system and double pawl used by a quality chain lever hoist is superior. Coffing, Harrington and Yale, though I prefer Harrington because you can get them with a short handle for tight spots.

YMMV



The OP is asking about pulling vehicles out of the mud, not lifting super heavy shit into the sky.

A pawl failure in a cable comealong is pretty undramatic on the trail. Cables snapping with no warning is basically unheard of. Chain failures happen so often, and are so spectacular, that no offroader in his right mind will use one.

ETA: Food for thought. Which of these items use chains vs. which use steel cable?
- Winches
- Cranes
- Elevators
- Suspension bridges

Those applications use cables because they are flexible, compact and light for their strength. But snapping cables is far from unheard of, and when they do snap, they come back at very high speeds, sometimes up to the speed of sound. People can and do get beheaded by them. That is why winch manuals recommend hanging something (blanket, jacket, whatever) on the line when winching; to slow the cable down if it breaks.
Chains don't whip through the air like that because they stretch very little compared to a cable. I have overloaded and broken both cables and chains, and can tell you from experience that chain is far safer.


Sure on the blanket. They also tell you to not use the winch for recovery of vehicles other than your own; that's what recovery straps are for.

However and again, we're talking about a comealong, not a power winch, so you'll be able to hear the cable singing pretty easily before it gives, and good comealongs will have a fail-safes designed to fail before the cable (or comealong) does, as a signal to you. If you're careful, and pay attention, a cable is always the safer, stronger option. Can you tell if any chain link is defective, weak, or fatigued just by looking? It's pretty easy to see when a cable is damaged, squished, fraying, or otherwise unsafe.

People don't get beheaded by cables because cables are inferior, they get beheaded because they are being stupid –– or sitting/standing alongside someone else being stupid.
EviL_inside  [Team Member]
9/23/2011 6:07:14 PM EST
Originally Posted By possumlivingdotcom:

Originally Posted By allenNH:
Originally Posted By pen:
Originally Posted By Powderfinger:
Originally Posted By pen:
1.5 ton Harrington chain come along FTW.


Cable come alongs are an accident waiting to happen.


Having handled and used many dozens of cable come alongs (many worn/abused to where they had to be finally removed from service) in a severe environment over a 26 year period, I find that untrue. You need to know your tools' limitations though, and how to inspect them.
I'm talking Ingersol-Rand quality, not chinese junk though.




Having used lever hoists, both cable and chain, for 30+ years in industrial maintenance, I find your untrue, to be untrue. I agree you need to know your tools limitations, but a significant number of maintenance programs (that I have worked with) will not even allow cable hoists to be used due to the inherent problems with using them. Releasing them under load, using the standard cable hoist ratchet and pawl system is not safe. Period. The gear reduction system and double pawl used by a quality chain lever hoist is superior. Coffing, Harrington and Yale, though I prefer Harrington because you can get them with a short handle for tight spots.

YMMV



The OP is asking about pulling vehicles out of the mud, not lifting super heavy shit into the sky.

A pawl failure in a cable comealong is pretty undramatic on the trail. Cables snapping with no warning is basically unheard of. Chain failures happen so often, and are so spectacular, that no offroader in his right mind will use one.

ETA: Food for thought. Which of these items use chains vs. which use steel cable?
- Winches
- Cranes
- Elevators
- Suspension bridges

Those applications use cables because they are flexible, compact and light for their strength. But snapping cables is far from unheard of, and when they do snap, they come back at very high speeds, sometimes up to the speed of sound. People can and do get beheaded by them. That is why winch manuals recommend hanging something (blanket, jacket, whatever) on the line when winching; to slow the cable down if it breaks.
Chains don't whip through the air like that because they stretch very little compared to a cable. I have overloaded and broken both cables and chains, and can tell you from experience that chain is far safer.


Truth. I always use chain, when I have the space to store and carry it.
ske714  [Team Member]
9/24/2011 5:05:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By allenNH:
Originally Posted By possumlivingdotcom:

Originally Posted By allenNH:
Originally Posted By pen:
Originally Posted By Powderfinger:
Originally Posted By pen:
1.5 ton Harrington chain come along FTW.


Cable come alongs are an accident waiting to happen.


Having handled and used many dozens of cable come alongs (many worn/abused to where they had to be finally removed from service) in a severe environment over a 26 year period, I find that untrue. You need to know your tools' limitations though, and how to inspect them.
I'm talking Ingersol-Rand quality, not chinese junk though.




Having used lever hoists, both cable and chain, for 30+ years in industrial maintenance, I find your untrue, to be untrue. I agree you need to know your tools limitations, but a significant number of maintenance programs (that I have worked with) will not even allow cable hoists to be used due to the inherent problems with using them. Releasing them under load, using the standard cable hoist ratchet and pawl system is not safe. Period. The gear reduction system and double pawl used by a quality chain lever hoist is superior. Coffing, Harrington and Yale, though I prefer Harrington because you can get them with a short handle for tight spots.

YMMV



The OP is asking about pulling vehicles out of the mud, not lifting super heavy shit into the sky.

A pawl failure in a cable comealong is pretty undramatic on the trail. Cables snapping with no warning is basically unheard of. Chain failures happen so often, and are so spectacular, that no offroader in his right mind will use one.

ETA: Food for thought. Which of these items use chains vs. which use steel cable?
- Winches
- Cranes
- Elevators
- Suspension bridges

Those applications use cables because they are flexible, compact and light for their strength. But snapping cables is far from unheard of, and when they do snap, they come back at very high speeds, sometimes up to the speed of sound. People can and do get beheaded by them. That is why winch manuals recommend hanging something (blanket, jacket, whatever) on the line when winching; to slow the cable down if it breaks.
Chains don't whip through the air like that because they stretch very little compared to a cable. I have overloaded and broken both cables and chains, and can tell you from experience that chain is far safer.


Sure on the blanket. They also tell you to not use the winch for recovery of vehicles other than your own; that's what recovery straps are for.

However and again, we're talking about a comealong, not a power winch, so you'll be able to hear the cable singing pretty easily before it gives, and good comealongs will have a fail-safes designed to fail before the cable (or comealong) does, as a signal to you. If you're careful, and pay attention, a cable is always the safer, stronger option. Can you tell if any chain link is defective, weak, or fatigued just by looking? It's pretty easy to see when a cable is damaged, squished, fraying, or otherwise unsafe.

People don't get beheaded by cables because cables are inferior, they get beheaded because they are being stupid –– or sitting/standing alongside someone else being stupid.


FIFY

Myth Busted

"A 5/8" cable at 30,000 lbs of tension was unable to cut a pig in two (or even cut into it), but did cause potentially lethal injuries. The MythBusters took the test even further by adding a smaller cable at the end of larger one to create a "whip" effect, and even pre-looped a cable around the pig itself. None of these methods could cut the pig by the pre-tensed cable’s inertia alone. The pig was cut in half only when Adam tied a cable around it and then tightened the cable. Also, after making inquiries with almost every safety organization imaginable, the MythBusters were unable to find any concrete evidence of a person being cut in half by a snapped cable."
WilliamGray  [Team Member]
9/24/2011 5:26:25 AM EST
My brother was on the deck of the USS Comstock about 7 years ago when a cable removed both legs of a sailor above the knee. I have no doubt it could have taken the guys head off had it been higher.
scottedward58  [Team Member]
9/24/2011 5:51:43 AM EST
I find one by it's self isn't as capable as you would think it would be for it's given rating but two will seem to do wonders. Buy two identical ones and you can pull some amazing loads. Basically you hook them up in parallel and right next to each other. You then crank on one until it gets too hard to pull then crank on the other. The one you're not cranking on takes up part of the load allowing the other to do more work. Then there are all the other uses for two winches and you will find they are worth their weight in gold. Also get some chain rated for the loads the hoists are rated for because decent anchor points never seem to be within reach.

ETA: also don't bother with the 2 ton models, get the 4 ton you will be much happier with them.
ske714  [Team Member]
9/24/2011 5:53:36 AM EST
Originally Posted By WilliamGray:
My brother was on the deck of the USS Comstock about 7 years ago when a cable removed both legs of a sailor above the knee. I have no doubt it could have taken the guys head off had it been higher.


Okay. But I'm guessing that the forces involved were slightly higher than those generated with a come-along. I would be willing to bet that it tore them off, rather than cut them off. No doubt, cables, chains, or straps under tension are to be feared, and respected. They will put a hurtin on you. I had a strap break once, and it sounded like a rifle shot. There is a pickup truck I see on my way to work sometimes that had a long, winding impression of a chain on the tailgate.

biere  [Team Member]
9/24/2011 6:32:46 AM EST
The mention of using 2 at once is something I do with ratchet straps loading cars on trailers if the car is dead and the trailer has no winch.

Use one ratchet strap to pull the load up as far as you can and then attach the next strap and remove the load from the first strap. Undo the first strap and use in repeat fashion to load the vehicle.

You could do this with 2 come alongs but I hate my cheap come along and have never spent the money on a good one.

I would buy a heck of a good one if you plan to use it for vehicle recovery, vehicles are heavy and if you consider what many people feel they need for a winch on their vehicle then I would expect needing a similar rating on a come along. The more power puller or some of the other expensive ones are what I would consider buying but I admit to not having one.

I also don't have a winch for my vehicle. Only winch around here right now is a broken one for a quad.

I do have a hi lift jack and have used it before, it is a heck of a thing as well.
wilNva  [Member]
9/24/2011 6:36:44 AM EST
I've been using a cheap $19.99 harbor freight one for years to pull cars up onto trailers and other various crap. I imagine a good one would pull a car out of mud/ditch with no problem.
2tom2  [Member]
9/24/2011 6:37:29 AM EST
Kinda like a flat head and Phillips head screwdriver....every one needs at least 1
LePew  [Member]
9/24/2011 6:40:17 AM EST
Originally Posted By allenNH:
Originally Posted By LePew:
Two questions:

1. How to tell the cheap come-alongs from the good ones. (not "don't buy it from these guys" but 'what construction features to look for')

2. Where to shop for the good come-alongs.



http://www.lug-all.com/


Thanks, those look very nice.
WilliamGray  [Team Member]
9/24/2011 7:23:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By wilNva:
I've been using a cheap $19.99 harbor freight one for years to pull cars up onto trailers and other various crap. I imagine a good one would pull a car out of mud/ditch with no problem.


Usually if you are stuck to the point you need a winch, you are buried to the axles. The number I have always heard is 1.5 times vehicle weight for winch capacity.
Mud adds a lot of weight.
EviL_inside  [Team Member]
9/24/2011 10:53:51 AM EST
Originally Posted By ske714:
Originally Posted By WilliamGray:
My brother was on the deck of the USS Comstock about 7 years ago when a cable removed both legs of a sailor above the knee. I have no doubt it could have taken the guys head off had it been higher.


Okay. But I'm guessing that the forces involved were slightly higher than those generated with a come-along. I would be willing to bet that it tore them off, rather than cut them off. No doubt, cables, chains, or straps under tension are to be feared, and respected. They will put a hurtin on you. I had a strap break once, and it sounded like a rifle shot. There is a pickup truck I see on my way to work sometimes that had a long, winding impression of a chain on the tailgate.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EX19sAudmic


Hahaha, the ONLY way a chain could have snapped back like that is if he had it on the end of a strap or cable. Chains don't stretch and build up spring tension to make them fly anywhere. If a chain breaks, it DROPS right where it is.
AlvinYork  [Team Member]
9/24/2011 1:10:38 PM EST
Originally Posted By ske714:
Originally Posted By WilliamGray:
My brother was on the deck of the USS Comstock about 7 years ago when a cable removed both legs of a sailor above the knee. I have no doubt it could have taken the guys head off had it been higher.


Okay. But I'm guessing that the forces involved were slightly higher than those generated with a come-along. I would be willing to bet that it tore them off, rather than cut them off. No doubt, cables, chains, or straps under tension are to be feared, and respected. They will put a hurtin on you. I had a strap break once, and it sounded like a rifle shot. There is a pickup truck I see on my way to work sometimes that had a long, winding impression of a chain on the tailgate.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EX19sAudmic


The second jump the yellow shirt made was phenomenal.
ske714  [Team Member]
9/24/2011 3:45:11 PM EST
Originally Posted By EviL_inside:
Originally Posted By ske714:
Originally Posted By WilliamGray:
My brother was on the deck of the USS Comstock about 7 years ago when a cable removed both legs of a sailor above the knee. I have no doubt it could have taken the guys head off had it been higher.


Okay. But I'm guessing that the forces involved were slightly higher than those generated with a come-along. I would be willing to bet that it tore them off, rather than cut them off. No doubt, cables, chains, or straps under tension are to be feared, and respected. They will put a hurtin on you. I had a strap break once, and it sounded like a rifle shot. There is a pickup truck I see on my way to work sometimes that had a long, winding impression of a chain on the tailgate.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EX19sAudmic


Hahaha, the ONLY way a chain could have snapped back like that is if he had it on the end of a strap or cable. Chains don't stretch and build up spring tension to make them fly anywhere. If a chain breaks, it DROPS right where it is.


I always thought the same thing. It may depend on the chain? I know straps and wire rope stretch, and chains, not so much. Anyway, there is no doubt about what hit his tailgate. I laugh every time I see it.
ske714  [Team Member]
9/24/2011 3:52:28 PM EST
Originally Posted By AlvinYork:
Originally Posted By ske714:
Originally Posted By WilliamGray:
My brother was on the deck of the USS Comstock about 7 years ago when a cable removed both legs of a sailor above the knee. I have no doubt it could have taken the guys head off had it been higher.


Okay. But I'm guessing that the forces involved were slightly higher than those generated with a come-along. I would be willing to bet that it tore them off, rather than cut them off. No doubt, cables, chains, or straps under tension are to be feared, and respected. They will put a hurtin on you. I had a strap break once, and it sounded like a rifle shot. There is a pickup truck I see on my way to work sometimes that had a long, winding impression of a chain on the tailgate.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EX19sAudmic


The second jump the yellow shirt made was phenomenal.


Saved himself a smackdown. Greenshirt never saw it coming.
inop  [Team Member]
9/24/2011 4:09:15 PM EST
I have broken a few of the standard type(won't buy another regular one)
I am thinking if I buy a new one it will be
a more power puller one
or
a feed through like this

http://www.4x4groupbuy.com/store/black-tuff-pull-recovery-winch-7700lb-p-6493.html
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