AR15.Com Archives
 Can a parent force a child to take birth control?
HKUSP45C  [Member]
2/7/2011 11:14:00 PM EST
With the advent of "the shot" (once every three months) can a parent, concerned about the choices their daughter is making, force the child to get the shot while they are a minor?

Let's not discuss what got a parent here in the first place, I'm looking for an intellectual exercise in how much you own our child. Moral implications and the like.
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BiteDog  [Team Member]
2/7/2011 11:15:23 PM EST
Just hide it in their cereal.

It works on my dogs.
DOUGHERTY03  [Team Member]
2/7/2011 11:22:14 PM EST
Originally Posted By HKUSP45C:
With the advent of "the shot" (once every three months) can a parent, concerned about the choices their daughter is making, force the child to get the shot while they are a minor?

Let's not discuss what got a parent here in the first place, I'm looking for an intellectual exercise in how much you own our child. Moral implications and the like.


The way shit is now, I think you would be an idiot not to.

Spikes08  [Team Member]
2/7/2011 11:27:56 PM EST

Originally Posted By DOUGHERTY03:
Originally Posted By HKUSP45C:
With the advent of "the shot" (once every three months) can a parent, concerned about the choices their daughter is making, force the child to get the shot while they are a minor?

Let's not discuss what got a parent here in the first place, I'm looking for an intellectual exercise in how much you own our child. Moral implications and the like.


The way shit is now, I think you would be an idiot not to.


Bingo
fadedsun  [Team Member]
2/7/2011 11:31:48 PM EST
If you have to force your child to take bc the maturity level for sexual activity is not there.

LOW2000  [Team Member]
2/7/2011 11:32:50 PM EST
Mature Minor Doctrine

Some states no, some states yes.

http://www.enotes.com/everyday-law-encyclopedia/treatment-minors
HKUSP45C  [Member]
2/7/2011 11:43:44 PM EST
Originally Posted By fadedsun:
If you have to force your child to take bc the maturity level for sexual activity is not there.



Thanks for reading the opening post and forming your reply based upon its, relatrively simple, constraints.
DOUGHERTY03  [Team Member]
2/7/2011 11:46:59 PM EST
Originally Posted By fadedsun:
If you have to force your child to take bc the maturity level for sexual activity is not there.



I disagree, kids as young as 12 are doing stupid sexual things and getting pregnant. Are you telling me 12 year olds have the maturity to make proper choices when it comes to sex? I don't think so but they are doing it anyway.

HKUSP45C  [Member]
2/7/2011 11:52:41 PM EST
Originally Posted By DOUGHERTY03:
Originally Posted By fadedsun:
If you have to force your child to take bc the maturity level for sexual activity is not there.



I disagree, kids as young as 12 are doing stupid sexual things and getting pregnant. Are you telling me 12 year olds have the maturity to make proper choices when it comes to sex? I don't think so but they are doing it anyway.



I think his point was something along the lines of: If you feel the need to dose your child with birth control they aren't mature enough to be having sex. Which, of course, ignores the fact that sexual desire and maturity almost never meet at a cross street.

Which was kind of the point of the thread, if they aren't mature enough to make good decisions about sex are they still the parents responsibility and therefore able to be dosed with a birth control agent.
TechGal26  [Team Member]
2/7/2011 11:53:11 PM EST
I think back to High School, and I would say that most of the girls I knew would have done it willingly if it was given to them(i.e. mom and dad paid for it.)
I doubt it has changed that much..
HKUSP45C  [Member]
2/8/2011 12:06:11 AM EST
Originally Posted By TechGal26:
I think back to High School, and I would say that most of the girls I knew would have done it willingly if it was given to them(i.e. mom and dad paid for it.)
I doubt it has changed that much..


There's probably a tremendous amount of truth to that. When I was in high school, birth control was largely the guys problem but, when I made it beyond the "I live at home" game I noticed that the vast, vast majority of women were taking care of themselves.

Aremed with your perspective at what age would you, as a parent, offer birth control to your children?
44Regular  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 12:18:36 AM EST
Edited-joker581
HKUSP45C  [Member]
2/8/2011 12:26:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By 44Regular:
Edited-joker581


I grew up under sharia law, I don't find your commernts amusing.
Harvster  [Life Member]
2/8/2011 12:36:31 AM EST
Now what could have possibly made you post such a thing.....hmmmmm..maybe....Satan?

44Regular  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 12:39:39 AM EST
Edited-joker581
TechGal26  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 12:41:58 AM EST

Originally Posted By HKUSP45C:
Originally Posted By TechGal26:
I think back to High School, and I would say that most of the girls I knew would have done it willingly if it was given to them(i.e. mom and dad paid for it.)
I doubt it has changed that much..


There's probably a tremendous amount of truth to that. When I was in high school, birth control was largely the guys problem but, when I made it beyond the "I live at home" game I noticed that the vast, vast majority of women were taking care of themselves.

Aremed with your perspective at what age would you, as a parent, offer birth control to your children?
I'm not a parent but, that said my ex's daughter's(14 and 15) and I had an understanding that there would be a box of condoms in with the feminine products should they ever want them.
~Maybe it was wrong of me, but it was better, IMO, than them feeling they had to depend on a teenaged boy...
MarkNH  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 12:47:55 AM EST

Originally Posted By BiteDog:
Just hide it in their cereal.

It works on my dogs.

You feed your dogs cereal for breakfast? cheerios, cocoa puffs. or lucky charms?
HRomberg  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 12:52:20 AM EST
You don't own your kid. You hold their rights in trust. Sometimes the things look the same but they aren't. Anyway, I'd feel fine telling my kid to get the shot. Then again it wouldn't be an isolated order. If you need to order said girl to take BC, you've got bigger problems than just the BC.

Oh yeah. For boys, it's different. If there was a shot you could give a young guy so he wouldn't get a chick pregnant (and it was definitely temporary and not something that would harm him) I'd be inclined to have my hypothetical son get the shot. I wouldn't tell him though, since I'd still want him scared shitless of being a Dad as an incentive to use a condom if he succumbed to the hormones.
PlaneJane  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 12:57:14 AM EST
Originally Posted By HKUSP45C:
Originally Posted By 44Regular:
Edited-joker581


I grew up under sharia law, I don't find your commernts amusing.

Hate that I missed this one. But from the context, I wonder which way he voted in the socialism/sharia poll.

Jane

PlaneJane  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 1:07:27 AM EST
Originally Posted By TechGal26:

Originally Posted By HKUSP45C:
Originally Posted By TechGal26:
I think back to High School, and I would say that most of the girls I knew would have done it willingly if it was given to them(i.e. mom and dad paid for it.)
I doubt it has changed that much..


There's probably a tremendous amount of truth to that. When I was in high school, birth control was largely the guys problem but, when I made it beyond the "I live at home" game I noticed that the vast, vast majority of women were taking care of themselves.

Aremed with your perspective at what age would you, as a parent, offer birth control to your children?
I'm not a parent but, that said my ex's daughter's(14 and 15) and I had an understanding that there would be a box of condoms in with the feminine products should they ever want them.
~Maybe it was wrong of me, but it was better, IMO, than them feeling they had to depend on a teenaged boy...

An eminently sensible approach, in my opinion. I think it increases the chance that a child will decide to enter into a inappropriate sexual relationship by about twenty percent and reduces the potential for life long, adverse consequences by about eighty percent. A no-brainer to my way of thinking.


Jane



ByNameRequest  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 1:14:45 AM EST
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
Originally Posted By TechGal26:

Originally Posted By HKUSP45C:
Originally Posted By TechGal26:
I think back to High School, and I would say that most of the girls I knew would have done it willingly if it was given to them(i.e. mom and dad paid for it.)
I doubt it has changed that much..


There's probably a tremendous amount of truth to that. When I was in high school, birth control was largely the guys problem but, when I made it beyond the "I live at home" game I noticed that the vast, vast majority of women were taking care of themselves.

Aremed with your perspective at what age would you, as a parent, offer birth control to your children?
I'm not a parent but, that said my ex's daughter's(14 and 15) and I had an understanding that there would be a box of condoms in with the feminine products should they ever want them.
~Maybe it was wrong of me, but it was better, IMO, than them feeling they had to depend on a teenaged boy...

An eminently sensible approach, in my opinion. I think it increases the chance that a child will decide to enter into a inappropriate sexual relationship by about twenty percent and reduces the potential for life long, adverse consequences by about eighty percent. A no-brainer to my way of thinking.

Jane



Jane, I don't disagree with your assessment, just curious as to the origin of those statistics...
PlaneJane  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 1:23:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By ByNameRequest:
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
Originally Posted By TechGal26:

Originally Posted By HKUSP45C:
Originally Posted By TechGal26:
I think back to High School, and I would say that most of the girls I knew would have done it willingly if it was given to them(i.e. mom and dad paid for it.)
I doubt it has changed that much..


There's probably a tremendous amount of truth to that. When I was in high school, birth control was largely the guys problem but, when I made it beyond the "I live at home" game I noticed that the vast, vast majority of women were taking care of themselves.

Aremed with your perspective at what age would you, as a parent, offer birth control to your children?
I'm not a parent but, that said my ex's daughter's(14 and 15) and I had an understanding that there would be a box of condoms in with the feminine products should they ever want them.
~Maybe it was wrong of me, but it was better, IMO, than them feeling they had to depend on a teenaged boy...

An eminently sensible approach, in my opinion. I think it increases the chance that a child will decide to enter into a inappropriate sexual relationship by about twenty percent and reduces the potential for life long, adverse consequences by about eighty percent. A no-brainer to my way of thinking.

Jane



Jane, I don't disagree with your assessment, just curious as to the origin of those statistics...

Oh, I just made them up for the purpose of illustration, that's why I prefaced them with "I think" rather than "A study by so-and-so reveals". My point was that it is my opinion that the availability of birth control does increase sexual activity slightly, while reducing adverse effects significantly. My post was poorly worded; my apologies for the confusion.

Jane



ByNameRequest  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 1:30:16 AM EST
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
Originally Posted By ByNameRequest:
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
Originally Posted By TechGal26:

Originally Posted By HKUSP45C:
Originally Posted By TechGal26:
I think back to High School, and I would say that most of the girls I knew would have done it willingly if it was given to them(i.e. mom and dad paid for it.)
I doubt it has changed that much..


There's probably a tremendous amount of truth to that. When I was in high school, birth control was largely the guys problem but, when I made it beyond the "I live at home" game I noticed that the vast, vast majority of women were taking care of themselves.

Aremed with your perspective at what age would you, as a parent, offer birth control to your children?
I'm not a parent but, that said my ex's daughter's(14 and 15) and I had an understanding that there would be a box of condoms in with the feminine products should they ever want them.
~Maybe it was wrong of me, but it was better, IMO, than them feeling they had to depend on a teenaged boy...

An eminently sensible approach, in my opinion. I think it increases the chance that a child will decide to enter into a inappropriate sexual relationship by about twenty percent and reduces the potential for life long, adverse consequences by about eighty percent. A no-brainer to my way of thinking.

Jane



Jane, I don't disagree with your assessment, just curious as to the origin of those statistics...

Oh, I just made them up for the purpose of illustration, that's why I prefaced them with "I think" rather than "A study by so-and-so reveals". My point was that it is my opinion that the availability of birth control does increase sexual activity slightly, while reducing adverse effects significantly. My post was poorly worded; my apologies for the confusion.

Jane



Fair enough–– a subtle distinction that I missed....
scott917  [Member]
2/8/2011 2:24:41 AM EST
you tell them the pills are to help regulate their cycles.... this is why i am told that girls are on it.

S
gary1976  [Member]
2/8/2011 3:04:16 AM EST
i think so
xLucidx  [Member]
2/8/2011 3:15:51 AM EST
as far as a shot goes im going to say no

i work in a hospital and regardless of age you can refuse ANY injection

you may have better luck getting her put on the pill, or taking her to the doctor to have a serious discussion about BC
MR_GOAT  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 3:25:47 AM EST
Probably


But I've never heard of anyone being forced to take it
BigeasySnow  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 4:05:21 AM EST
The pill made me wish I were dead when I was a newly wed 21 year old. If I'd been put on it when I was a teenager, there's a good chance I wouldn't be here. Not only that, but I would have been less likely to use condoms.

Fucking with another person's hormones is serious shit. Especially if that person is already in a kinda crazy point in their life where hormones are already fucked up. Medicating someone against their will, regardless of their age and dependency will always be a difficult issue.
hilljb  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 4:13:59 AM EST
Originally Posted By HKUSP45C:
Originally Posted By DOUGHERTY03:
Originally Posted By fadedsun:
If you have to force your child to take bc the maturity level for sexual activity is not there.



I disagree, kids as young as 12 are doing stupid sexual things and getting pregnant. Are you telling me 12 year olds have the maturity to make proper choices when it comes to sex? I don't think so but they are doing it anyway.



I think his point was something along the lines of: If you feel the need to dose your child with birth control they aren't mature enough to be having sex. Which, of course, ignores the fact that sexual desire and maturity almost never meet at a cross street.

Which was kind of the point of the thread, if they aren't mature enough to make good decisions about sex are they still the parents responsibility and therefore able to be dosed with a birth control agent.



Herein lies the rub.... I believe that at one point in our distant past, they DID meet at a crossroads. You have 30 year old children these days; adults who are childishly impulsive, with no sense of personal responsibility or regard for the effects of their actions on others or themselves. 150 years ago, a 12 year old was plowing the field, hunting the game, etc etc. and COULD HAVE (had it come to that) been a providing and nurturing father figure were he to get a young lady pregnant. I wouldn't trust a 12 year old these days with being responsible enough to take out the garbage.

brokenyapper  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 4:16:27 AM EST
Originally Posted By hilljb:
Originally Posted By HKUSP45C:
Originally Posted By DOUGHERTY03:
Originally Posted By fadedsun:
If you have to force your child to take bc the maturity level for sexual activity is not there.



I disagree, kids as young as 12 are doing stupid sexual things and getting pregnant. Are you telling me 12 year olds have the maturity to make proper choices when it comes to sex? I don't think so but they are doing it anyway.



I think his point was something along the lines of: If you feel the need to dose your child with birth control they aren't mature enough to be having sex. Which, of course, ignores the fact that sexual desire and maturity almost never meet at a cross street.

Which was kind of the point of the thread, if they aren't mature enough to make good decisions about sex are they still the parents responsibility and therefore able to be dosed with a birth control agent.



Herein lies the rub.... I believe that at one point in our distant past, they DID meet at a crossroads. You have 30 year old children these days; adults who are childishly impulsive, with no sense of personal responsibility or regard for the effects of their actions on others or themselves. 150 years ago, a 12 year old was plowing the field, hunting the game, etc etc. and COULD HAVE (had it come to that) been a providing and nurturing father figure were he to get a young lady pregnant. I wouldn't trust a 12 year old these days with being responsible enough to take out the garbage.



HKUSP45C  [Member]
2/8/2011 4:18:56 AM EST
Originally Posted By BigeasySnow:
The pill made me wish I were dead when I was a newly wed 21 year old. If I'd been put on it when I was a teenager, there's a good chance I wouldn't be here. Not only that, but I would have been less likely to use condoms.

Fucking with another person's hormones is serious shit. Especially if that person is already in a kinda crazy point in their life where hormones are already fucked up. Medicating someone against their will, regardless of their age and dependency will always be a difficult issue.


That's a really good point.
ADaughen  [Member]
2/8/2011 4:25:08 AM EST
Get the IUD inserted. Minor can't get it removed without a parent's permission... Lasts ~5 years.



Granted, this doesn't fix the original problem and may magnify the whoring.



And in Ohio, yes, a parent can get an IUD "installed" in their child that doesn't care about the consequences of their actions.
EagleWeasel  [Member]
2/8/2011 4:27:01 AM EST
Originally Posted By hilljb:
Originally Posted By HKUSP45C:
Originally Posted By DOUGHERTY03:
Originally Posted By fadedsun:
If you have to force your child to take bc the maturity level for sexual activity is not there.



I disagree, kids as young as 12 are doing stupid sexual things and getting pregnant. Are you telling me 12 year olds have the maturity to make proper choices when it comes to sex? I don't think so but they are doing it anyway.



I think his point was something along the lines of: If you feel the need to dose your child with birth control they aren't mature enough to be having sex. Which, of course, ignores the fact that sexual desire and maturity almost never meet at a cross street.

Which was kind of the point of the thread, if they aren't mature enough to make good decisions about sex are they still the parents responsibility and therefore able to be dosed with a birth control agent.



Herein lies the rub.... I believe that at one point in our distant past, they DID meet at a crossroads. You have 30 year old children these days; adults who are childishly impulsive, with no sense of personal responsibility or regard for the effects of their actions on others or themselves. 150 years ago, a 12 year old was plowing the field, hunting the game, etc etc. and COULD HAVE (had it come to that) been a providing and nurturing father figure were he to get a young lady pregnant. I wouldn't trust a 12 year old these days with being responsible enough to take out the garbage.



The derp is strong with this one.
mousehunter  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 6:20:20 AM EST
I don't see a major source of conflict here. Most people who do not have moral issues with premarital sex do not have issues with birth control either.
BigeasySnow  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 6:27:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By ADaughen:
Get the IUD inserted. Minor can't get it removed without a parent's permission... Lasts ~5 years.



Granted, this doesn't fix the original problem and may magnify the whoring.



And in Ohio, yes, a parent can get an IUD "installed" in their child that doesn't care about the consequences of their actions.


I'd have gotten it out, one way or another. Just like women find ways to abort when when it's illegal.
Jolkm  [Member]
2/8/2011 5:34:43 PM EST
If it's legal for a parent to force their kid to take BC, it shouldn't be. Shit like that is F***ed up beyond words.
ProPatriaVeritas  [Member]
2/8/2011 5:37:31 PM EST
Birth control should be in the water supply with only highly qualified and financially able individuals given access to the antidote
Jolkm  [Member]
2/8/2011 5:39:32 PM EST
Originally Posted By BigeasySnow:
The pill made me wish I were dead when I was a newly wed 21 year old. If I'd been put on it when I was a teenager, there's a good chance I wouldn't be here. Not only that, but I would have been less likely to use condoms.

Fucking with another person's hormones is serious shit. Especially if that person is already in a kinda crazy point in their life where hormones are already fucked up. Medicating someone against their will, regardless of their age and dependency will always be a difficult issue.


Well said.
uafgrad  [Life Member]
2/8/2011 5:41:25 PM EST
Originally Posted By fadedsun:
If you have to force your child to take bc the maturity level for sexual activity is not there.



Kids are having sex sometimes as young as grade school
Even in high school, the vast majority of them are no where near the maturity level needed to make potential life altering decisions

If you need a reality check, simply watch an episode of 16 and pregnant and you'll see what I mean
uafgrad  [Life Member]
2/8/2011 5:42:49 PM EST
Originally Posted By TechGal26:

Originally Posted By HKUSP45C:
Originally Posted By TechGal26:
I think back to High School, and I would say that most of the girls I knew would have done it willingly if it was given to them(i.e. mom and dad paid for it.)
I doubt it has changed that much..


There's probably a tremendous amount of truth to that. When I was in high school, birth control was largely the guys problem but, when I made it beyond the "I live at home" game I noticed that the vast, vast majority of women were taking care of themselves.

Aremed with your perspective at what age would you, as a parent, offer birth control to your children?
I'm not a parent but, that said my ex's daughter's(14 and 15) and I had an understanding that there would be a box of condoms in with the feminine products should they ever want them.
~Maybe it was wrong of me, but it was better, IMO, than them feeling they had to depend on a teenaged boy...


At least you talked to them about sex, make proper choices and potential ramifications about those choices
fadedsun  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 6:22:16 PM EST
Originally Posted By DOUGHERTY03:
Originally Posted By fadedsun:
If you have to force your child to take bc the maturity level for sexual activity is not there.



I disagree, kids as young as 12 are doing stupid sexual things and getting pregnant. Are you telling me 12 year olds have the maturity to make proper choices when it comes to sex? I don't think so but they are doing it anyway.



That says a lot about the parenting and the environment.

Don't let the public schools get to your kids before you do.


anesvick  [Member]
2/8/2011 6:48:14 PM EST
Don't people watch their kids anymore?

I mean hell, I got a 14 year old boy on his first girlfriend, and I told him that if I found out he was sexually irresponsible (read active with anyone but himself) at all, he could forget getting his permit at 15, and forget getting his license or a job at 16. He's a pretty good kid, and they have just barely gotten to the point where they can look at one another. I don't worry about him.

My 12 year old daughter, I do worry about, she is an attention seeker, and just found HER first boyfriend. I took him aside, and told him about my,"shoot, shovel, and shut up" policy if my daughter happens to end up as being a non-virgin before her marriage and I introduced him to the sharp pointy things collection, and offered to take him shooting if he behaves himself.

See, no need for birth control, just monitoring and prevention.

TechGal26  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 9:48:03 PM EST

Originally Posted By uafgrad:
Originally Posted By TechGal26:


At least you talked to them about sex, make proper choices and potential ramifications about those choices
Their parents seemed to have the ignore it and pretend teenagers don't think of sex part down pat.
That attitude can cause alot of problems as well.
Handsome_Rob  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 10:01:03 PM EST
My gut instinct to your question is instinctively "yes, until they're 18".

I will say that as a father of a 2 year old daughter this has provoked some unwelcome thoughts. Necessary thoughts though. So, thanks.

ETA: "unwelcome thoughts" is not the right definition for my original response without this edit. This is a very slippery slope scenario and a topic I have not considered at all, but I'm grateful your thread has got me thinking. In fact, I'm going to leave my unedited instinct response but also add that "it also depends on how well I've raised my child, which directly reflects on my character as a parent".

I suppose only history will judge the parenting aspect, which also scares every parent (i hope). I assure you - there aren't many parents that have children and claim "I sure hope I screw up while raising my child". Sure, there are a lot of screwed up people in this world... but I'll say as a relatively new parent (ages 4 and almost 2) - I don't really know if I'm doing this entirely right or not. There are a lot of books, which I have read, that "teach" child-rearing but seriously - with every human being different all you can really hope to do is set a good example. (granted, some do not set good examples)

Like I said, your comment got me thinking.... If you need to force your daughter into birth control, something may not have gone right in other aspects of the environment.

I think my stance is changed from my original response. I will force my child to take a birth control form - if it's medically related to keeping her physically healthy and alive. Otherwise, if I happen to get to the point where we have some unusual teen pregnancy, I can say I will most likely be a supportive and proud Grandfather.

Hopefully I've just shown a detailed thought process that goes into "GD replies" - my instant gut after reading was "A". After some thought I've talked myself out of it to "B"... Mostly because of the comments I've read before hand. AND - it wasn't a flipflop because I admitted that I hadn't given it much thought before.

polarbare  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 10:34:04 PM EST


Originally Posted By xLucidx:
as far as a shot goes im going to say no

i work in a hospital and regardless of age you can refuse ANY injection

you may have better luck getting her put on the pill, or taking her to the doctor to have a serious discussion about BC


Can a child refuse a vaccination? Just curious...
Silverbulletz06  [Team Member]
2/8/2011 11:54:55 PM EST
Keep your daughter off the pole.

Keep the pole off your daughter.



Legally, I don't think that there really has been a reuling as far as that. Until 18, unless they are pregnant, they are bound to their parents, so one would assume that yes you could force them to have Depo shots. I think it would be a little harder to find a doc that would do it against her will though.

Lucid, a kid cannot refuse. 5 year olds would never get an IV.
Hoppy  [Team Member]
2/9/2011 12:27:14 AM EST
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
An eminently sensible approach, in my opinion. I think it increases the chance that a child will decide to enter into a inappropriate sexual relationship by about twenty percent and reduces the potential for life long, adverse consequences by about eighty percent. A no-brainer to my way of thinking.


Jane


Both of my daughters went on the pill at an early age because I remember what it was like to be a teenager.

"Better to have it and not need it..."


Hoppy  [Team Member]
2/9/2011 12:30:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By anesvick:
Don't people watch their kids anymore?

I mean hell, I got a 14 year old boy on his first girlfriend, and I told him that if I found out he was sexually irresponsible (read active with anyone but himself) at all, he could forget getting his permit at 15, and forget getting his license or a job at 16. He's a pretty good kid, and they have just barely gotten to the point where they can look at one another. I don't worry about him.

My 12 year old daughter, I do worry about, she is an attention seeker, and just found HER first boyfriend. I took him aside, and told him about my,"shoot, shovel, and shut up" policy if my daughter happens to end up as being a non-virgin before her marriage and I introduced him to the sharp pointy things collection, and offered to take him shooting if he behaves himself.

See, no need for birth control, just monitoring and prevention.






HKUSP45C  [Team Member]
2/9/2011 12:45:36 AM EST
Originally Posted By Hoppy:
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
An eminently sensible approach, in my opinion. I think it increases the chance that a child will decide to enter into a inappropriate sexual relationship by about twenty percent and reduces the potential for life long, adverse consequences by about eighty percent. A no-brainer to my way of thinking.


Jane


Both of my daughters went on the pill at an early age because I remember what it was like to be a teenager.

"Better to have it and not need it..."




Jane and yourself have given me a lot to think about. I'll find out the sex of my child at the end of the week. I fully intend to be the kind of father who is involved with their child's reproductive life while they live at home. I hope to never face this decision, I assume my morals and decision making will rub off on my kid. I was just curious to see what the concensus was on "forced birth control" on their own children, in case, just, incase, I wholly fuck up the child rearing process.

I'll say this for Jane, If you do provide them the means to get laid without the awful consequences, you DO allow a small moral pitfall without the consequences of the HUGE lifelong pitfall of a child at 14 or younger.It does seem like a no-brainer.

I don't mean to sound odd with these questions, I just have a lot going on right now with the anticipation of my child.
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