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 need electric heater for 500 sq ft room
pavlovwolf  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 1:47:44 PM
Has to be electric only.Will be only heat in house.
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DriftPunch  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 1:48:43 PM
Anybody else hear the waha-wahaa-wahaaa music...
RarestRX  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 1:50:09 PM

Check the Delonghi oil filled radiators. They put out some heat.
Umbrellacorp  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 1:52:22 PM
They have pretty cheap sling systems out there for the AR. Just gotta shop around. Whats great about the cheap slings is If you tear um up your not out too much. Try ctd.
callgood  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 2:00:47 PM
Originally Posted By RarestRX:

Check the Delonghi oil filled radiators. They put out some heat.


+1

I picked one up at Lowes last winter to keep the garage from freezing (plants, paint, etc.).

It did a good job but the garage is only around 350 sq ft. Your insulation is probably better so it might be a wash, 500 v 350. Or you could get two, they were only around 40 bucks last year. I have it near some exercise equipment and if I brush up against it I don't get burned.

inthe605  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 2:33:17 PM
What's budget?

I use a sunheat, pretty much same thing as eden pure. But they are on the high side in price.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
inthe605  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 2:34:58 PM
Originally Posted By Umbrellacorp:
They have pretty cheap sling systems out there for the AR. Just gotta shop around. Whats great about the cheap slings is If you tear um up your not out too much. Try ctd.


Good to know, as to why its relevant in this thread is beyond me.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
USMCRONIN  [Member]
10/18/2010 3:56:31 PM
Could be a bad idea...

How do you expect the heat to migrate to the rest of the house? How big is your entire house? one story? two story?
You very likely to have multiple cold spots in the house, and as such could freeze pipes if no heat where the cold water pipes are located.
Why do you feel you can only have one heater?
Trying to heat a medium to large house from one room is likely to cause some major overloading of the electrical circuit you plug it into.
Likely the max heater size that will not roast your wiring/breaker will hot be enough to heat entire house.
The room with the heat will be very warm, the further away colder, how cold of course depends on how cold it is outside.
Is this for emergency use?

If you doing this for typical winter heating on the cheap for something like a rental house, better check with your local codes.
Here in Oregon, EACH room has to be able to be heated to 65-68 degrees F in the center of the room @ 3 feet above the floor.
that can't be done for the whole house with only one heater in one room. And in the long run you'll have possible mold growth issues
nikroft  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 4:03:44 PM
Originally Posted By callgood:
Originally Posted By RarestRX:

Check the Delonghi oil filled radiators. They put out some heat.


+1

I picked one up at Lowes last winter to keep the garage from freezing (plants, paint, etc.).

It did a good job but the garage is only around 350 sq ft. Your insulation is probably better so it might be a wash, 500 v 350. Or you could get two, they were only around 40 bucks last year. I have it near some exercise equipment and if I brush up against it I don't get burned.



+2
gamesniper  [Member]
10/18/2010 4:06:27 PM
I've got a Honeywell oil filled radiator heater and it does a pretty damn good job on it's lowest setting (of 600W/900W/1500W) but a lot of the people around me use the Edenpure type heaters and are quite happy with them.

Of course, the difference is about $50 for the radiator vs $289 for the quartz type (Edenpure)
pavlovwolf  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 4:46:23 PM
The house is just over 5000 sq ft. It's a ranch style built in 1959. It's very well insulated. I only use two rooms other than the bathroom, and I have a small heater that does well there. It has electric central heat, but the unit is very old and inefficient, and I cannot afford to replace it, or to run it as is since the power bills would be over 400 monthly.I have a gas heater in the room I stay in, a kitchen, dining room area with a sofa that is 45x10. I had it cut off last year since the house wasn't being lived in at the time. I have a friend that would give me another unit for the other part of the house that will go in the fireplace, if I could get the gas back on. The problem is, the house is in my fathers name, and they're saying that I have to put the bill in my name because he isn't here, ( he's in a nursing home.), which will cost me a $300.00 deposit. I have complete power of attorney, to act as his agent in all affairs, but it appears I will have to go a little higher up to get results. I'll go ahead and say this, I can't afford much of anything because I'm on disability, hence, no new central heat. Also, no 300.00 deposit, which I feel is unnecessary anyway, since the bill is paid up..My son sleeps in the living room area and that room is 35x20. I don't actually need to heat 500sq ft or so, but if one is capable of that, it should heat what I need well enough and still be fairly efficient and not pushing it's limits. That's why I asked the question that way. Also, since the natural gas company may be difficult to deal with, I decided to approach this as the only heat source for the house. I'm not heating the rest of the house, so everything else will be closed off, unless I need to be in there,and at that point I can move the heater in that room. I jsut need to be able to get two heaters for these two rooms. You guys are always great with your answers.
Oh, I will look into the cheaper slings as well, though I run a Magpul MS2 on mine. My son needs one.
Londo  [Member]
10/18/2010 4:50:41 PM
Aren't all the consumer model electric room heaters pretty much the the same when it comes to maximum allowable output?

My understanding is they can't run more than 1400 or 1500 watts without special wiring.
Skibane  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 4:59:02 PM
Aside from the oil-fllled models, the baseboard-style heaters are nice, too - Both types don't have a fan, so there's no noise or moving parts to fail. Both types usually have a high/low wattage switch - running the heater on the low-wattage position allows it to run a lot cooler while still doing an adequate job of heating the room.

I'd avoid the ceramic heaters - The ceramic heating element is temperature-sensitive, and doesn't produce full wattage unless the room is very cold. Also, they have a fan, which makes them noisy and more failure-prone.
jkingrph  [Member]
10/18/2010 6:59:36 PM
I use one of the oil filled electric radiators in my storage shed. Heater has 3 possible heat settings 600, 900, or combined to 1500 watts. The shed is a 12x14, basically a portable building, but built on a slab. Walls are 2x4 insulated with 3/8" reflectivix shiny aluminum foil over plastic bubble, +3 1/2 fiberglass. Ceiling is gambrel roof, and insulated only with reflectivix. I rarely have to go above 600 watt setting, only when temp drops into low 20's which is rare here.
Skibane  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 9:16:40 PM
One other advantage of the big, stupid heaters (oil-filled, baseboard, etc.) is that they tend to run a lot cooler for any given amount of heat output. Getting 1500 watts of heat out of a tiny heater requires it to run at very high temperatures - which increases the chances of burning itself out (or even worse, starting a fire).

I've owned quite a few small heaters over the years, and none of them held up to running full-tilt for days on end. Often, during protracted cold snaps, they either would refuse to run continuously (overheat protection switch periodically opening up), or would die completely.
1shott  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 9:26:27 PM
I hear the Amish make one with a really cool mantel....
pavlovwolf  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 10:34:34 PM
Thanks for the help. I'm looking at one of the Lasko tower heaters that a fiend has that he really likes, and the Delonghi or maybe a different brand of oil filled coolers. Hopefully I can talk sense into the ladies at the gas company and get the gas turned back on for nothing, or a small reconnect fee.
Skibane  [Team Member]
10/18/2010 10:49:48 PM
Originally Posted By pavlovwolf:
I'm looking at one of the Lasko tower heaters that a fiend has that he really likes


Some tower heaters use a quartz heating element that is fragile - Tip the heater over once, and the element is toast.

pavlovwolf  [Team Member]
10/19/2010 4:54:07 PM
I took the POA in to the gas company and let them know that I would contimue to go higher until I got the answer I was looking for. My poa clearly states that I am able to act as my fathers agent iin all matters, it is a complete P.O.A.. I was able to keep the gas bill in his name, waiving the 300 dollar deposit. I will still have to pay 60 dollars to reconnect. Now I just need one heater for the otherr room. Still looking for suggestions. Thanks guys.
pavlovwolf  [Team Member]
10/19/2010 4:54:37 PM
I took the POA in to the gas company and let them know that I would contimue to go higher until I got the answer I was looking for. My poa clearly states that I am able to act as my fathers agent iin all matters, it is a complete P.O.A.. I was able to keep the gas bill in his name, waiving the 300 dollar deposit. I will still have to pay 60 dollars to reconnect. Now I just need one heater for the otherr room. Still looking for suggestions. Thanks guys.
NoHarmNoFAL  [Team Member]
10/19/2010 5:04:02 PM
Originally Posted By Londo:
Aren't all the consumer model electric room heaters pretty much the the same when it comes to maximum allowable output?

My understanding is they can't run more than 1400 or 1500 watts without special wiring.


This is true.

All store bought 110V heaters will be a MAX of 1500 Watts.

Will one of those heat a room to 90F, no. Will it keep it livable with a sweater on, most likely depending on how well insulated it is.
mike103  [Team Member]
10/19/2010 5:06:18 PM
Five watts per square foot is the formula used when sizing electric heat.
mike103  [Team Member]
10/19/2010 5:17:43 PM
And I forgot to add that most baseboard heat gives 200 watts per foot so you will need about 12 feet of baseboard for that room.

Do not use a fan forced heater. The noise will drive you crazy.

You don't have to use one 12 foot piece of baseboard you can use say two six footers.

Use 240V only and don't use in thermostats that are in the baseboard. Use the wall mounted if possible.
ORIGINAL-Waterdog  [Member]
10/19/2010 6:23:59 PM
Originally Posted By pavlovwolf:
Has to be electric only.Will be only heat in house.


A 300 lb woman

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