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 The worst story of Police Corruption I have ever heard. Cop haters will LOVE this one.
mgwantob  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:17:16 PM
WASHINGTON, D.C.– Five defendants, including former Jacksonville, Florida, deputy sheriff's officers were sentenced yesterday in connection with a crime spree in which several Jacksonville area citizens were victimized, and involved a home invasion, abductions, robberies, and the murder of a Jacksonville-area businessman, the Justice Department announced today.

The defendants include convicted co-conspirators Aric Sinclair, Jason Pough and Reginald Bones, former Jacksonville sheriff officers. According to trial testimony, the officers, acting under color of law, abused their powers in order to abduct, rob and subsequently murder Jacksonville convenience store owner, Sami Safar. Sinclair was sentenced to 17 years and seven months in prison, 5 years of supervised release and was ordered to pay over $108,000 in restitution to the victims of his crimes. Pough was sentenced to five years imprisonment, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay over $500 in restitution to his victims. Bones was sentenced on bank fraud charges unrelated to the case and given three years of supervised release, 100 hours of community service and ordered to pay back $11,000 in restitution to the bank fraud victims.

Defendants Kenneth McLaughlin, James Swift, Jr., and Darryl Crowden, were participants in various crimes with the Jacksonville sheriff officers. McLaughlin, convicted of participating in the murder and kidnaping of the victim, was sentenced to 19 years and seven months in prison, five years of supervised release and ordered to pay over $108,000 in restitution. Swift will be sentenced on Feb. 4, 2003. Crowden, convicted of robbery and drug offenses, received four years and three months in prison, five years supervised release and was ordered to pay $50,000 in restitution to his victims.

Karl T. Waldon, a 39-year old Jacksonville sheriff's officer, charged in a 1998 indictment, and convicted by a jury in November 2002 for his role in the crime spree that resulted in the murder of Safar awaits sentencing on January 27, 2003.

The murder victim, Safar, owned convenience stores that cashed checks for customers. The indictment charges that Officer Sinclair worked as a security guard at a bank branch where Mr. Safar maintained accounts. Sinclair noted that the victim made large cash withdrawals from the bank on Fridays.

The indictment further states that on July 3, 1998, Karl T. Waldon ordered Swift and McLaughlin to act as lookouts in anticipation of Safar making a withdrawal from his bank. Once Waldon, who was in uniform and driving his marked police car, received the lookout call from his accomplices, he turned on his emergency lights and pulled over Safar. Waldon unlawfully took Safar into custody, handcuffing him and placing him in the back of the police car.

Safar was then driven to an isolated location, where Swift and McLaughlin joined Waldon. Waldon placed a rope around Safar's neck and choked him, rendering him unconscious. Waldon then took the driver's seat and ordered McLaughlin into the back seat to make sure Safar was dead. Waldon and his accomplices dumped Safar's body in a wooded area and stole $51,000 in cash withdrawals from him.

"This heinous crime of conspiracy, greed and police misconduct took the life of a community businessman and undermined the honorable work of law enforcement personnel everywhere," said Ralph F. Boyd, Jr., Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division. "The Department will continue to prosecute the abuse of power by a small minority of law enforcement officers to ensure that the trust between law enforcement and communities remain strong."

The case was jointly prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney's office for the Middle District of Florida and the Civil Rights and Criminal Divisions of the Department of Justice. The case was investigated by a by a task force composed of agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) and detectives from the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office, Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE).


http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2003/January/03_crt_034.htm

I started looking into this case a few years back after I witnessed a JSO officer receive a payoff from a man whose wife was pulled over for a DUI hit and run in front of my house. I knew the woman, and knew she had probably been drinking all night at a country club also in my neighborhood. I watched her husband pay off the officer and then I watched the two of them drive away.

Yes, I reported it. No, nothing ever happened. I know there are good LEOs out there, but this particular department makes me go Go watch "Murder on a Sunday Morning." It was a documentary about how JSO detectives beat a murder confession out of a 15 year old kid in 2000. Yeah, it won an Oscar.

UPDATE: Look them up on the Federal Inmate locator... three have been released from prison, one gets out in 2013, one in 2016, and only one got life
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c0t0d0s0  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:21:03 PM
Who's got the popcorn?
capnrob97  [Life Member]
7/8/2010 5:22:24 PM
Originally Posted By mgwantob:


I started looking into this case a few years back after I witnessed a JSO officer receive a payoff from a man whose wife was pulled over for a DUI hit and run in front of my house. I knew the woman, and knew she had probably been drinking all night at a country club also in my neighborhood.I watched her husband pay off the officer and then I watched the two of them drive away.

Yes, I reported it. No, nothing ever happened. I know there are good LEOs out there, but this particular department makes me go Go watch "Murder on a Sunday Morning." It was a documentary about how JSO detectives beat a murder confession out of a 15 year old kid in 2000. Yeah, it won an Oscar.


Deerwood?
cosmos556  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:23:37 PM
Originally Posted By c0t0d0s0:
Who's got the popcorn?


Hope they bring enough to share...
godrilla47  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:24:24 PM
IN..
TLD05  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:25:06 PM
staringback05  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:25:09 PM
LOL i remember this, i know officers that worked with them...and yes....YES what they did was fucked up...
this is 10 years old however to....that is a 2200 man department and to think theres not someone fucked up
individuals in it your crazy...remember affirmative action? well lets just say some officers are products of it
joemama74  [Member]
7/8/2010 5:25:22 PM
No life sentence?

No death penalty?

Bullshit.
mgwantob  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:26:10 PM
Originally Posted By capnrob97:
Originally Posted By mgwantob:


I started looking into this case a few years back after I witnessed a JSO officer receive a payoff from a man whose wife was pulled over for a DUI hit and run in front of my house. I knew the woman, and knew she had probably been drinking all night at a country club also in my neighborhood.I watched her husband pay off the officer and then I watched the two of them drive away.

Yes, I reported it. No, nothing ever happened. I know there are good LEOs out there, but this particular department makes me go Go watch "Murder on a Sunday Morning." It was a documentary about how JSO detectives beat a murder confession out of a 15 year old kid in 2000. Yeah, it won an Oscar.


Deerwood?


Ortega actually.
ColtD1911  [Member]
7/8/2010 5:27:01 PM
Nothing new...
SsevenN  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:27:55 PM
Seems like they got off really really REALLY easy for a premeditated and heinous act.
VictorUnit  [Member]
7/8/2010 5:29:39 PM
Originally Posted By mgwantob:
WASHINGTON, D.C.– Five defendants, including former Jacksonville, Florida, deputy sheriff's officers were sentenced yesterday in connection with a crime spree in which several Jacksonville area citizens were victimized, and involved a home invasion, abductions, robberies, and the murder of a Jacksonville-area businessman, the Justice Department announced today.

The defendants include convicted co-conspirators Aric Sinclair, Jason Pough and Reginald Bones, former Jacksonville sheriff officers. According to trial testimony, the officers, acting under color of law, abused their powers in order to abduct, rob and subsequently murder Jacksonville convenience store owner, Sami Safar. Sinclair was sentenced to 17 years and seven months in prison, 5 years of supervised release and was ordered to pay over $108,000 in restitution to the victims of his crimes. Pough was sentenced to five years imprisonment, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay over $500 in restitution to his victims. Bones was sentenced on bank fraud charges unrelated to the case and given three years of supervised release, 100 hours of community service and ordered to pay back $11,000 in restitution to the bank fraud victims.

Defendants Kenneth McLaughlin, James Swift, Jr., and Darryl Crowden, were participants in various crimes with the Jacksonville sheriff officers. McLaughlin, convicted of participating in the murder and kidnaping of the victim, was sentenced to 19 years and seven months in prison, five years of supervised release and ordered to pay over $108,000 in restitution. Swift will be sentenced on Feb. 4, 2003. Crowden, convicted of robbery and drug offenses, received four years and three months in prison, five years supervised release and was ordered to pay $50,000 in restitution to his victims.

Karl T. Waldon, a 39-year old Jacksonville sheriff's officer, charged in a 1998 indictment, and convicted by a jury in November 2002 for his role in the crime spree that resulted in the murder of Safar awaits sentencing on January 27, 2003.

The murder victim, Safar, owned convenience stores that cashed checks for customers. The indictment charges that Officer Sinclair worked as a security guard at a bank branch where Mr. Safar maintained accounts. Sinclair noted that the victim made large cash withdrawals from the bank on Fridays.

The indictment further states that on July 3, 1998, Karl T. Waldon ordered Swift and McLaughlin to act as lookouts in anticipation of Safar making a withdrawal from his bank. Once Waldon, who was in uniform and driving his marked police car, received the lookout call from his accomplices, he turned on his emergency lights and pulled over Safar. Waldon unlawfully took Safar into custody, handcuffing him and placing him in the back of the police car.

Safar was then driven to an isolated location, where Swift and McLaughlin joined Waldon. Waldon placed a rope around Safar's neck and choked him, rendering him unconscious. Waldon then took the driver's seat and ordered McLaughlin into the back seat to make sure Safar was dead. Waldon and his accomplices dumped Safar's body in a wooded area and stole $51,000 in cash withdrawals from him.

"This heinous crime of conspiracy, greed and police misconduct took the life of a community businessman and undermined the honorable work of law enforcement personnel everywhere," said Ralph F. Boyd, Jr., Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division. "The Department will continue to prosecute the abuse of power by a small minority of law enforcement officers to ensure that the trust between law enforcement and communities remain strong."

The case was jointly prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney's office for the Middle District of Florida and the Civil Rights and Criminal Divisions of the Department of Justice. The case was investigated by a by a task force composed of agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) and detectives from the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office, Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE).


http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2003/January/03_crt_034.htm

I started looking into this case a few years back after I witnessed a JSO officer receive a payoff from a man whose wife was pulled over for a DUI hit and run in front of my house. I knew the woman, and knew she had probably been drinking all night at a country club also in my neighborhood. I watched her husband pay off the officer and then I watched the two of them drive away.

Yes, I reported it. No, nothing ever happened. I know there are good LEOs out there, but this particular department makes me go Go watch "Murder on a Sunday Morning." It was a documentary about how JSO detectives beat a murder confession out of a 15 year old kid in 2000. Yeah, it won an Oscar.


waiting for full story

good tase

762DM  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:30:09 PM
No pictures?


Just sayin'
RI0T  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:33:03 PM



I'm not LE so I'm not allowed to criticize.










Screechjet1  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:36:46 PM
Originally Posted By SsevenN:
Seems like they got off really really REALLY easy for a premeditated and heinous act.


My feelings...I wonder what the Federal case will look like, or if there will be one.
machinisttx  [Member]
7/8/2010 5:37:32 PM
Should have been executed in the town square.
Bama-Shooter  [Site Staff]
7/8/2010 5:41:40 PM
Everyone of them should be put to death.
WindRiver78  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:42:50 PM
This Aint Good.........
Seastate  [Member]
7/8/2010 5:43:21 PM
Well the cop made it home safe!

WTF. Why no LIFE in prison for the cop. He used his badge to gain access to his victim. Should be life or death penalty based on that alone.

This is the kind of shit that used to only happen in third world countries I guess it's here now!.
m4pointman  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:50:01 PM
Don't know the details but it looks like they got sentences that are way too light for crimes committed.
ecgRN  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 5:58:01 PM
Originally Posted By cosmos556:
Originally Posted By c0t0d0s0:
Who's got the popcorn?


Hope they bring enough to share...


Marty369  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 6:01:21 PM
Everyone of them should have gotten the chair. WTF,.......worst of the worst
tactmaster  [Member]
7/8/2010 6:01:56 PM
Originally Posted By Seastate:
Well the cop made it home safe!

WTF. Why no LIFE in prison for the cop. He used his badge to gain access to his victim. Should be life or death penalty based on that alone.

This is the kind of shit that used to only happen in third world countries I guess it's here now!.


I agree with you on the death penalty. Disagree that this never happened in the US before. Should we talk about the Mobs that paid of police for years and years? And who know how many times the police victimized innocent people. It's always been here, it's the drive by media that was not.
mgwantob  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 6:02:59 PM
I think they should be on death row now, but some of them will be getting out of prison in just a few years.
HAFLINGER  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 6:10:11 PM
Leo never seems ot get the same treatment as civilians, they always seem to be held to a much lower standard than your average Joe.
Thuban  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 6:13:42 PM
Originally Posted By Bama-Shooter:
Everyone of them should be put to death.


Amen.

What they did was truly hideous on so many levels. No only was it premeditated murder of an innocent man for money, crimes like that make the general population fearful of the police force. It’s an outright betrayal of law enforcement as an institution. It’s an attack on the respect for law in society. And, of course it’s the worst kind of murder imaginable.

All of them ought to be hanged.

Screechjet1  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 6:31:45 PM
And, they'll spend all that time in seg, too.
SGB  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 6:43:43 PM
Old news but they all should have gotten the
Bama-Shooter  [Site Staff]
7/8/2010 6:44:46 PM
Originally Posted By Thuban:
Originally Posted By Bama-Shooter:
Everyone of them should be put to death.


Amen.

What they did was truly hideous on so many levels. No only was it premeditated murder of an innocent man for money, crimes like that make the general population fearful of the police force. It’s an outright betrayal of law enforcement as an institution. It’s an attack on the respect for law in society. And, of course it’s the worst kind of murder imaginable.

All of them ought to be hanged.



Agree.
Bama-Shooter  [Site Staff]
7/8/2010 6:45:41 PM


Seems to easy to me for what they did.

Pulbic hanging in the town square on a bright Saturday afternoon.
Iggyort  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 6:48:12 PM
tag for later
vanilla_gorilla  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 6:50:43 PM

Originally Posted By Bama-Shooter:
Everyone of them should be put to death.


This.
Another_Dude  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 6:50:44 PM
You weren't therrrrrre man! Unless you worked the cold, hard streets with these guys you can't possibly understand. If you weren't there when it went down you have no business talking about it. I have inside info and you're wrong, but I can't say why and won't come back to this thread.





wunbadweel  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 6:55:39 PM
Originally Posted By Bama-Shooter:
Everyone of them should be put to death.


Concur. I'm really curious how these sentences were decided upon.
Master_Blaster  [Member]
7/8/2010 6:57:29 PM

...The indictment further states that on July 3, 1998, Karl T. Waldon ordered Swift and McLaughlin to act as lookouts in anticipation of Safar making a withdrawal from his bank. Once Waldon, who was in uniform and driving his marked police car, received the lookout call from his accomplices, he turned on his emergency lights and pulled over Safar. Waldon unlawfully took Safar into custody, handcuffing him and placing him in the back of the police car.

Safar was then driven to an isolated location, where Swift and McLaughlin joined Waldon. Waldon placed a rope around Safar's neck and choked him, rendering him unconscious. Waldon then took the driver's seat and ordered McLaughlin into the back seat to make sure Safar was dead. Waldon and his accomplices dumped Safar's body in a wooded area and stole $51,000 in cash withdrawals from him.

"This heinous crime of conspiracy, greed and police misconduct took the life of a community businessman and undermined the honorable work of law enforcement personnel everywhere," said Ralph F. Boyd, Jr., Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division. "The Department will continue to prosecute the abuse of power by a small minority of law enforcement officers to ensure that the trust between law enforcement and communities remain strong."


1st-deg murder = "misconduct".

Seems to me they got off.
Venkman  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 6:59:25 PM
Isolated incident.
FLAL1A  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 7:04:24 PM
I knew each of those officers personally. I worked with some of them. I represented one in a disciplinary matter. They were each and all crooked, stinking, lying bastards unfit to be in the same room as a real policeman, and everybody knew it.

They were hired during a numbers push. Somebody promised "X hundred officers in the next 2 years," or something like that. This happens every time police are hired under pressure to produce numbers of officers. It happened in DC, NO, and LA that I know of, besides Jacksonville.

So how did they manage to stay on despite notorious bad character and constant incompetence and wickedness? Did somebody ask for pics?

BTW, the case described is a federal case.
SoCalJBT  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 7:19:03 PM
Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
I knew each of those officers personally. I worked with some of them. I represented one in a disciplinary matter. They were each and all crooked, stinking, lying bastards unfit to be in the same room as a real policeman, and everybody knew it.

.


But did you help the officer beat his case? If so, how did it make you feel?
FLAL1A  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 7:52:45 PM
Originally Posted By SoCalJBT:
Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
I knew each of those officers personally. I worked with some of them. I represented one in a disciplinary matter. They were each and all crooked, stinking, lying bastards unfit to be in the same room as a real policeman, and everybody knew it.

.


But did you help the officer beat his case? If so, how did it make you feel?


Yes, I did. It was my job. It made me feel like I needed a shower, but so did shaking hands with him.
mgwantob  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 7:54:49 PM
Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
I knew each of those officers personally. I worked with some of them. I represented one in a disciplinary matter. They were each and all crooked, stinking, lying bastards unfit to be in the same room as a real policeman, and everybody knew it.

They were hired during a numbers push. Somebody promised "X hundred officers in the next 2 years," or something like that. This happens every time police are hired under pressure to produce numbers of officers. It happened in DC, NO, and LA that I know of, besides Jacksonville.

So how did they manage to stay on despite notorious bad character and constant incompetence and wickedness? Did somebody ask for pics?

BTW, the case described is a federal case.


Pics PLEASE
SoCalJBT  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 8:10:19 PM
Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
Originally Posted By SoCalJBT:
Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
I knew each of those officers personally. I worked with some of them. I represented one in a disciplinary matter. They were each and all crooked, stinking, lying bastards unfit to be in the same room as a real policeman, and everybody knew it.

.


But did you help the officer beat his case? If so, how did it make you feel?


Yes, I did. It was my job. It made me feel like I needed a shower, but so did shaking hands with him.


Good answer, counselor. You should have been a prosecutor.
FLAL1A  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 8:13:21 PM
Originally Posted By SoCalJBT:
Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
Originally Posted By SoCalJBT:
Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
I knew each of those officers personally. I worked with some of them. I represented one in a disciplinary matter. They were each and all crooked, stinking, lying bastards unfit to be in the same room as a real policeman, and everybody knew it.

.


But did you help the officer beat his case? If so, how did it make you feel?


Yes, I did. It was my job. It made me feel like I needed a shower, but so did shaking hands with him.


Good answer, counselor. You should have been a prosecutor.


I was, for years. That's how I was able to kick in doors & fight with BGs despite my degree!
FLAL1A  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 8:13:51 PM
Originally Posted By mgwantob:
Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
I knew each of those officers personally. I worked with some of them. I represented one in a disciplinary matter. They were each and all crooked, stinking, lying bastards unfit to be in the same room as a real policeman, and everybody knew it.

They were hired during a numbers push. Somebody promised "X hundred officers in the next 2 years," or something like that. This happens every time police are hired under pressure to produce numbers of officers. It happened in DC, NO, and LA that I know of, besides Jacksonville.

So how did they manage to stay on despite notorious bad character and constant incompetence and wickedness? Did somebody ask for pics?

BTW, the case described is a federal case.


Pics PLEASE


Not necessary, and I don't have any.
thermocafe  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 8:19:59 PM
Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
I knew each of those officers personally. I worked with some of them. I represented one in a disciplinary matter. They were each and all crooked, stinking, lying bastards unfit to be in the same room as a real policeman, and everybody knew it.

They were hired during a numbers push. Somebody promised "X hundred officers in the next 2 years," or something like that. This happens every time police are hired under pressure to produce numbers of officers. It happened in DC, NO, and LA that I know of, besides Jacksonville.

So how did they manage to stay on despite notorious bad character and constant incompetence and wickedness? Did somebody ask for pics?

BTW, the case described is a federal case.


Good post.

I respectfully disagree with OP that wanting honest, honorable Peace Officers to dominate the show constitutes a "cop-hater". Most cops are damned fine people, and these trash give them a bad name.
Enigma102083  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 8:23:54 PM
Originally Posted By wunbadweel:
Originally Posted By Bama-Shooter:
Everyone of them should be put to death.


Concur. I'm really curious how these sentences were decided upon.


Probably from the sentencing guidelines on the books for those crimes. They got off way too light.
berto187  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 8:29:39 PM
Wow.

Tekka  [Member]
7/8/2010 8:39:06 PM
Even though I generally like the police here in Jacksonville. I've never been comfortable with the amount of people who've openly talked about seeing police paid to over look things. I don't think it's always been true, but I wouldn't doubt most of it was.
bonnevillain  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 8:39:45 PM
phurba  [Life Member]
7/8/2010 8:42:18 PM
Originally Posted By mgwantob:
Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
I knew each of those officers personally. I worked with some of them. I represented one in a disciplinary matter. They were each and all crooked, stinking, lying bastards unfit to be in the same room as a real policeman, and everybody knew it.

They were hired during a numbers push. Somebody promised "X hundred officers in the next 2 years," or something like that. This happens every time police are hired under pressure to produce numbers of officers. It happened in DC, NO, and LA that I know of, besides Jacksonville.

So how did they manage to stay on despite notorious bad character and constant incompetence and wickedness? Did somebody ask for pics?

BTW, the case described is a federal case.


Pics PLEASE


Er, why?
Tekka  [Member]
7/8/2010 8:46:30 PM

Originally Posted By mgwantob:
Originally Posted By capnrob97:
Originally Posted By mgwantob:


I started looking into this case a few years back after I witnessed a JSO officer receive a payoff from a man whose wife was pulled over for a DUI hit and run in front of my house. I knew the woman, and knew she had probably been drinking all night at a country club also in my neighborhood.I watched her husband pay off the officer and then I watched the two of them drive away.

Yes, I reported it. No, nothing ever happened. I know there are good LEOs out there, but this particular department makes me go Go watch "Murder on a Sunday Morning." It was a documentary about how JSO detectives beat a murder confession out of a 15 year old kid in 2000. Yeah, it won an Oscar.


Deerwood?


Ortega actually.

Was this at the Yacht Club in Ortega?
FLAL1A  [Team Member]
7/8/2010 8:48:17 PM
Originally Posted By Tekka:
Even though I generally like the police here in Jacksonville. I've never been comfortable with the amount of people who've openly talked about seeing police paid to over look things. I don't think it's always been true, but I wouldn't doubt most of it was.


It is bullshit, by and large.
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